Hi Guest!

Community Contributions

ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 5,000 10,000 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 6,689 new convicts added in total!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 29,423 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

67%

Goal: 1,000 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 50,000 contributions. We currently have 28,284 contributions.

57%

Recent Submissions

Iris Dunne on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Rose Smith:

Burial: Rookwood Cemetery, NSW, Section C, Row 12, Catholic Mortuary 2 & 3, Inscription: mother of Esther O’Byrne

Iris Dunne on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Rose Smith:

Tried: 5 January 1835

Convict Indents: Age 19, can read, Protestant, Single, Native Place: Middlesex, Trade: Kitchen Maid, Offence: Maid Robbery, no former convictions

Ticket of Leave No.40/2798

Gaol Description & Entrance Books, Newcastle, 1832-1833, Year of Birth: 1819

Iris Dunne on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of John Edmonds:

Convict Indents: Age 16, Estimated Birth Year: abt 1813, can read and write, Protestant, Single, Trade: Errand Boy, Offence: Street Robbery, Carter Barrack, Moreton Bay 26 May 1835 3years, Larceny Bathurst 2years and 21 days

Certificate of Freedom No.47/92 dated 22 January 1847, Prisoner’s No.30/1708, John Edmonds, Native Place: London, Trade: Laborer, Place of Trial: Middlesex G D, Date of Trial: 10 September 1829, Sentence: 14 years, Year of Birth: 1814, Held a TOLeave No.40/6 dated 4 January 1840

Iris Dunne on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Sarah Hopwood:

Tried: 2 February 1835

Convict Indents: Age 20, Protestant, Single, Trade: Housemaid parlour Maid, Offence: Stealing Books from Master, Genteel looking, Hight: 4 foot 11 3/4, Complexion: fair Ruddy, Hair: Light Sandy, Eyes: Hazel Grey

Certificate of Freedom No.42/158 dated 3 February 1842, Prisoner No.35/43, Year of Birth: 1815,Native Place: Shropshire, Trade: House Maid, Offence: Stealing from Master, General Remarks: Slight scar right side of lower lip….......Genteel appearance.

Iris Dunne on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of William Daniel Galliott:

Tried: 4 March 1816

Ticket of Leave: Protestant, Labourer

Certificate of Freedom: 30/90 dated 4 March 1830, Trade: Staymaker, Year of Birth 1786

Death: 3 March 1862, Newtown, NSW, Trove: SMH, Tue, 4 March 1862, “On the 3rd instant, at his residence, Newtown, Mr. William Galliott, in the 87th year of his age. Deceased was father of Mrs. Moffitt, Pitt-street, Sydney.”
https://australianroyalty.net.au/individual.php?pid=I26727&ged=purnellmccord.ged

Phil Hands on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of John Butler Hewson:

In 1827, at the pleasure of his Excellency, the Governor, John Butler Hewson, a ‘Ticket-of-Leave’ man, was appointed to replace Thomas Bishop, as Police Constable in Newcastle. The latter being dismissed for drunkenness.

From 1832-35,John was Gaoler, in Newcastle. Elizabeth was appointed as ‘Matron of the Gaol’, on 28th January, 1833.

Hewson resigned and then took over the lease on the ‘Union Inn’, which was situated on the corner, of what is now known, as Hunter and Bolton Sts, Newcastle. He remained there for another five, or so, years, until 22nd June, 1840, when he transferred the lease and Licence, to Robert Tighe.

In May, 1841, Hewson was granted the Licence for the ‘Rose and Crown’ hotel, in York St, Sydney, but the licence had to be transferred to a person named Cooper, as Hewson was likely to become insolvent. This happened, unfortunately, the following year, and, as reported in ‘The Australian’, on 30th June, 1842, Hewson surrendered his estate to Bankruptcy.

The ‘licence’ for the ‘old’ Union Inn was transferred from Sarah Tighe, Robert’s widow, to one William Latham. He, too, met with insolvency, in 1846.
John tried again, in 1846, when he was granted the Licence for the ‘‘Wool Pack Inn’. He also purchased some land in Lane St, Newcastle, and after somehow re-gaining the licence for the ‘old’ Union Inn, built the new ‘Union Inn’, in 1853. It is thought that James Hannell , Hewson’s stepson-in-law, a very successful Publican in his own right, was associated with this venture. In 1855, the lease was advertised on the ‘Union Inn’, as John and Elizabeth planned to retire.

Despite his convict background, John Butler Hewson was, by all accounts, a loving, gentle and earnest man. He accepted his lot, and in some cases, that of others, without problem. He raised some of Elizabeth’s children, mainly Mary Ann, and was much loved by her.

John died on the 3rd January 1874 age 73, closely followed by Elizabeth, on the 1st May 1874 age 82. They are both buried at the Christ Church cemetery, in Newcastle.

Barbara on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of John Edmonds:

John Edmunds (sometimes Edmonds) was convicted of running a parcel scam in London, probably as part of a gang, and found guilty of two offences.
He also did time at Moreton Bay on another larceny offence.
John married Rose/Rosina Smith (also a convict) in Maitland in 1841 and they had 10 children.
John ran a saddlery business with his sons in West Maitland for many years.
He died suddenly at his daughter’s property at Wagga Wagga.

Barbara on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Rose Smith:

Married convict John Edmunds in Maitland in 1841. He ran a saddlery business in the town for many years. Together they had 10 children. Rose was also known as Rosina.

Barbara on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Rose Smith:

Married convict John Edmunds 23/4/1841 in Maitland.

Phil Hands on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of John Butler Hewson:

Tried and convicted at the Old Bailey on 27th October 1819 for possession forged and counterfeit Bank notes, knowing them to be forged, sentenced to transportation for 14 years.
Left England on 11th April 1820.
Ship:- the ‘Mangles’ sailed with 190 male convicts on board of which 1 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 7th August 1820.

Married convict Elizabeth Hannell (‘Minstrel’ 1812) in 1828 at Newcastle, at the time, John was District Constable, and a ticket of leave man, he became the foster father of her children.

Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t18191027-37

1415. WILLIAM TURNBULL , EDWARD MOORE , GEORGE WILLIAMSON , JOHN BUTLER HEWSON , HANNAH GREEN , WILLIAM JONES , JOHN GREEN , THOMAS DOBBINS , DANIEL PRING , ISAAC TITTERTON , JOHN WEBSTER , BENJAMIN JOHNSON , WILLIAM JACKSON , JOHN BAILEY , and MARY ANN CROFT were severally and separately indicted for having in their possession forged and counterfeit Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .
To which indictment they severally and separately pleaded
GUILTY.
Transported for Fourteen Years .
Before Mr. Baron Wood and Mr. Justice Park.

L.S.Lamb on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of Charles Lovely:

Charles may have been married in Suffolk to Sarah Pike before he left England.
The children of Charles & Ellen (who died aged 36 in 1854) were:
Abner 1848-1914
Mary Ellen 1851-1914 (not 1859)
Children of Charles & Margaret as listed. Except that the first Mary (b.1858 and d. 1859) and it was the second Mary b.1859 who married William Whitfield.

Keith Riley on 22nd April, 2018 wrote of George Croucher:

Son of James and Elizabeth Croucher (née Newport).
Husband of Eliza Croucher (née Childs). Father of Louisa Croucher.

Father James and brother Charles were also convicted of sheep stealing. Father sentenced to 10 years. He stayed aboard a prison ship in Woolwich, London, England. Brother Charles was found not guilty.

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at York, England on 28 March 1835 for Burglary. Gaol Report: “idle, drunken, bad character, thief”. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Elphinstone’ arriving 24 May 1836. Ship Surgeon’s report: “good and diligent”.

Single man; aged 31 yrs; weaver & labourer; 5’3 1/2” height; dark complexion; dk brown hair; grey eyes.
Native place of birth: Barnsley, England.

VDL:
Assigned to work services.
14 June 1844: Ticket of Leave granted.
5 Oct 1847: Conditional Pardon approved.

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at Jamaica Court Martial on 27 May 1834 for desertion. Previously for desertion - branded and pardoned & 200 lashes. 14 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Mangles’ arriving 1 Aug 1835. Ship surgeon’s report: “quiet and useful”.

Aged 32 yrs; ploughman; 5’7 1/4 height; sallow complexion; red/brown hair; blue eyes.
Native place of birth: Royston, England.

VDL:
Assigned to work services.
Several records of misconduct and punishments.
1838: at Campbell Town
1842: at Picton

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at Stafford, England on 2 Jan 1833 for stealing money. Gaol Report: 4th conviction. Character bad & disposition.  7 yr transportation sentence. Hulk Report: “bad”. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land per the ‘Isabella’ 1833. Ship surgeon’s report: “orderly”.

Single man.

VDL:
Assigned to work services.
1834: Launceston Chain Gang.

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at the London Gaol on 15 April 1830 for breaking into a warehouse. Not known in prison before. Life sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Southworth’ 1830.

Married man, 6 children. Wife Ann with her father & mother at 2 Union St. Whitechapel, London.

VDL:
Assigned to work service.  No record of any misconduct.
19 Oct 1838: Conditional Pardon approved.
5 Feb 1839: Permission given to embark for England. Supt. memo.
6 Feb 1839: Free Certificate issued, no. 404.

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at Chester, England on 25 Aug 1825. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Woodman’ 1826.

Married man, one child.

VDL:
Assignments of work service.
1827: Suspicion of harbouring bushrangers, at “Lovely Banks”.
1831: to be sent to Port Arthur Penal Settlement.

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

Death:
10 Jan 1880 at the Lunatic Asylum, New Norfolk, Tasmania. Disease of heart. Pauper. Aged 62 yrs. (ref. 35/1/49 no. 477)

Nell Murphy on 21st April, 2018 wrote of William Simpson:

William SIMPSON was convicted at Edinburgh, Scotland on 12 May 1845 for housebreaking and theft.  3rd conviction. 7 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Equestrian’ 1845.

Aged 28yrs; single man; trade - a sweep; 5’6 3/4”; Protestant; can read & write; tatoos.
Native place of birth: Leith, Scotland.
Mother: Grace
Brother: Robert

VDL:
15 month Probation Period. Stationed at Lymington, VDL.
12 June 1849: Ticket of Leave granted.
25 May 1852: Free Certificate issued.

1 Aug 1866: Launceston - idle & disorderly. 1 mth’s hard labour.
7 Dec 1867: Launceston - Idle & disorderly. 2 mths hard labour.
Remarks: 1867 “blind”.
25 May 1868:Launceston - Idle & disorderly. 3 mths hard labour.
23 Nov 1868: Launceston - Idle & disorderly. 3 mths hard labour.
18 June 1869: at Port Arthur Penal Settlement.
1 Oct 1874: Lunatic Asylum, Port Arthur.
26 Oct 1875: Tried, at Port Arthur.

Phil Hands on 21st April, 2018 wrote of Mary Campbell:

Tried and convicted at the Lancaster Quarter Sessions in Liverpool on 15th January 1805, sentenced to transportation fopr 7 years.
Left Engloand on 11th January 1807.
Ship:- the ‘Sydney Cove’ sailed with 4 male and 113 female convicts on board of which 3 females died during the voyage.
Arrived on 18th June 1807.

Catherine married convict Thomas Herbert (‘Pitt’ 1792)  at Parramatta on 22nd May 1815 they had 7 children between 1809 and 1826.
From 1806 Thomas worked for the Macarthur’s on their estate at Camden becomming the overseer there.
John Macarthur was absent from New South Wales from 1801 1805. Macarthur was always an argumentative character and had a disagreement with Colonel Paterson his commanding officer, fought a duel, and Paterson was wounded. Governor King had Macarthur arrested and sent for trial in England in 1801.
In John’s absence the family’s pastoral interests were managed by his wife, Elizabeth, from her home at Elizabeth Farm at Parramatta. She called Stock Farm her Seven Hills Farm and was ably assisted by her farm manager, or overseer, initially with Richard Fitzgerald, followed by William Joyce, John Hindle and Thomas Herbert, Thomas was valued so much that Elizabeth Macarthur successfully requested the Governor grant land to him in 1811.

Thomas died on 17th October 1846 at Narellan, Southern Tablelands, NSW age 74 and was buried in St.Johns Anglican Church at Camden.
Catherine died on 21st February 1871 at Upper Picton, Southern Tablelands, NSW age 86.

Iris Dunne on 21st April, 2018 wrote of John Neighbour:

Convicted: 3rd January 1832

Description List: Trade: Brickmaker, Age 28

Conduct Record: Transported for stealing mutton, Single
http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/ImageViewer/image_viewer.htm?CON31-1-33,152,41,L,56

Phil Hands on 21st April, 2018 wrote of Thomas Herbert:

Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number t17910112-30

84. THOMAS HERBERT was indicted for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Macgauran and Dennis Doland , between the hours of twelve and two, at night, on the 17th of September , and feloniously stealing therein one brass candlestick, value 2 s. and five other candlesticks made of Prince’s-metal, value 10 s. their property.

DENNIS DOLAND sworn.
I live in Oxford-street ; I am an ironmonger there; my partner’s name is John Macgauran ; we live in the same house: on the 18th of December, about one in the morning, I was disturbed out of my sleep by knocking and ringing; I saw a parcel of people in the street from the window, and understood my shop was broke open.
In what manner? - I found a pane of glass broke, one shutter down, two hanging, and five or six candlesticks gone off the window.
How was it broke, by wrenching the shutters down of the shop? - One quite down, two more hanging.
It must require a degree of force to do this? - It must be force.
Have you a locking-bar that goes across? - Yes, there is a bar that goes across, and these shutters had no bearing upon that bar, so they slipt it down, and broke the glass, and stripped the shelf as far on each side as they could reach.
Was there more than one pane broke? - No more than one.
What was taken out? - About seven pair of candlesticks; I cannot exactly say; there may be five or six pair of brass candlesticks, and a Prince’s-metal candlestick, which is brass and copper with the metal; I inquired if they had taken any body; they said Mr. Hill, the constable, had taken one.
Had you seen the shutters that night? - I did not go outside, but I had seen that it was safe.
Was a pane of glass broke? - No; the pane of glass was whole.
What hour was it you saw it last? - About ten o’clock.
The window was not broke at ten o’clock, and the shutters to all appearance were up clear and right? - Yes.
Then the shutters could not fall by accident? - They could not.
You did not observe whether there was any mark of a crow, or any thing that had wrenched it? - I did not observe.
Mr. Knowlys, Prisoner’s Counsel. I understand your partner’s name is Macgauran, hath no one got any share in the business besides? - None.
You live in the house? - There are two houses, one lease; the one I live in, and he lives in the other.
Are your houses so circumstanced, that only one house has an opening into the shop? - Both have it; there is a party-wall between both houses, but there is an entrance from each house into the shop.
Do you pay your rent separately? - No, we do not.
Where was Mr. Macgauran at that time? - He sometimes sleeps at a lodging he has in the country; he has not good health.
Who arranged the goods in the window that day? - I do not know that any were put in that day; but they are cleaned once a week, and when there is a pair sold, they are replaced.
Will you take upon yourself to say, that there were candlesticks in the reach of this pane of glass? - There certainly were.
Court. Mr. Macgauran’s servants sleep in that part of the house? - Yes, they do.
He sometimes sleeps in the country, and sometimes in town there? - Yes, he does.

JOHN RUSSELL sworn.
I am porter to Messrs. Doland and Macgauran; I shut up the shutters, and left them all safe, about nine o’clock in the evening.
The windows were all safe, and the glass was not broke? - No, none.
How were they next day? - The shutters were all safe put up again when I came; I do not sleep in the house; my master put them up.

JOHN HILL sworn.
I live just by Mr. Doland, in the same street: as I was at the watch-house, and being fine, I walked down the street, a little below Mr. Doland’s house, to my own house, and came back again: when I walked down first, every thing was safe; I returned again in about a quarter of an hour; the first time I came out about half past twelve; in returning back, just before I came to Mr. Doland’s shop, I met a man; I had a suspicion of him, that he was a thief, and thought he had got something more than he should; I looked him hard in the face, and let him pass; when I came up to Mr. Doland’s house, there was a man stood at the shutters, facing the window; I saw one of the shutters taken out, and set on the ground; the bar goes about the bottom of the shutters, and by one shutter being taken out, two others were bent back; I was just going to say to myself, what was the matter, when I saw the man put his hand into the window, and pull out the candlestick; the man is the prisoner at the bar; as he pulled it out, I took hold of his collar, and he dropped the candlestick; and I took him into custody, and called the watch; when the watchman came, I picked up the candlestick, and knocked at the door.
Did you observe whether the shutters were forced by a crow or chissel? - I did not examine the shutters after I had got him.
Mr. Knowlys. Did you search this lad? - Yes, at the watch-house.
You found no crow, or any thing of that sort? - No.
You said you saw the shutter taken out, and put on the ground; you did not see this man do it? - I did not.
There was some person gone by that excited your suspicion? - There was.
You did not see the window broke? - I did not.
This man was taking the opportunity of that circumstance, of the window being down, and the glass being broke? - He was, certainly.
You did not find any instrument about him that would enable him to do this? - I did not.
(The candlestick produced, and deposed to.)
Court to Prosecutor. Was that candlestick in your shop the preceding day? - I cannot say that.
(The prisoner called William Parker , who lived in Brewer-street, Golden-square, with whom the prisoner and his father had lodged a year and a half, who gave both a very good character: the prisoner is a postillion, and lived with the Duke of Chandos till his death: he never knew him to be out a night in his life.)

JOHN ALLEN sworn.
I live in James-street, Grosvenor-square; I am a cordwainer; I have known the prisoner three or four years; he always bore a very good character for honesty; he got his living working among the horses.

THOMAS GOLDING sworn.
I live in James-street, Grosvenor-square, No. 28; I have known the prisoner four years; he always bore a very good character; I never heard any fault since the time I knew him.

GUILTY , Death . (Aged 18.)
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. COMMON SERJEANT.

Phil Hands on 21st April, 2018 wrote of Thomas Herbert:

Thomas was a Postilion (rider of carriage horse) and lived in the household of the Duke of Chandos in London until the duke’s death in 1789.
On 12th January 1791 he was tried and convicted at the Old Bailey for breaking and entering a shop / dwelling-house in Oxford Street and stealing 6 candlesticks, he was sentenced to death, this was later commuted to transportation for life.
Left England on 17th July 1791.
Ship:- the ‘Pitt’ sailed with 352 male and 58 female convicts on board of which 20 males and 9 females died during the voyage, 5 males were also reported to have escaped.
Arrived on 14th February 1792.

From 1806 he worked for the Macarthur’s on their estate at Camden becomming the overseer there.
John Macarthur was absent from New South Wales from 1801 1805. Macarthur was always an argumentative character and had a disagreement with Colonel Paterson his commanding officer, fought a duel, and Paterson was wounded. Governor King had Macarthur arrested and sent for trial in England in 1801.
In John’s absence the family’s pastoral interests were managed by his wife, Elizabeth, from her home at Elizabeth Farm at Parramatta. She called Stock Farm her Seven Hills Farm and was ably assisted by her farm manager, or overseer, initially with Richard Fitzgerald, followed by William Joyce, John Hindle and Thomas Herbert, Thomas was valued so much that Elizabeth Macarthur successfully requested the Governor grant land to him in 1811.

Thomas married convict Catherine (Mary) Campbell (‘Sydney Cove’ 1807)  at Parramatta on 22nd May 1815 they had 7 children between 1809 and 1826.

Thomas died on 17th October 1846 at Narellan, Southern Tablelands, NSW age 74 and was buried in St.Johns Anglican Church at Camden.
Catherine died on 21st February 1871 at Upper Picton, Southern Tablelands, NSW age 86.

Kaye Griffiths on 21st April, 2018 wrote of George Nankerville:

Married Abigail Roche (another convict from Cork, Ireland) 22 Sept 1829 in Sydney.

Nell Murphy on 20th April, 2018 wrote of Terence Rooney:

Terence and his brother Owen ROONEY were transported to New South Wales, Australia per the ship ‘Borodino’ 1828.

Terence died in an incident at Sydney just one month after his arrival - report from the press: “We stop the Press to report that, yesterday evening, between 7 and 8 several persons were wounded by bayonets, whilst quietly walking the streets between King St. and George Sts. In the bowels of one unfortunate man - a newly arrived prisoner by the Borodino (Terence Rooney)- a bayonet was deposited! The poor man was taken to the General Hospital, and in ten minutes after was dead” Gazette 18 August 1828.

One hundred pounds reward was later offered for information as to the identity of the soldier who had caused the death of Rooney.

 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 >  Last ›