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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 28,106 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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Recent Submissions

Iain Frazier on 26th January, 2020 wrote of William Frazer:

Interestingly, an Elizabeth (McCrath sic) is recorded as being employed by J (Frasier?) in 1822 in the 1822muster.

Iain Frazier on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Jess Fraser:

A Jessie is recorded as deceased in 1831, the wife of Peter (Gallaghan) with 2cildren enrolled at Queens Orphanage Hobart. The children were Mary (Gallaghan age7) & Jessie (Gallaghan age6)

D Wong on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Winifred Roach:

Winifred Roach was listed as 21 years old on arrival.

Place of Birth: Ireland.

Transported for ‘Stealing £12 and clothes.

Winifred was single, 5’0” tall, pale complexion, brown hair, dark blue eyes.

4/11/1845: TOL

31/3/1844: Permission to marry David Bantick (Gilmore 1831).

1/6/1844: Married at the Pontville church, David was 35, a butcher, Winifred was 26, a free woman and a spinster.
Children:
15/10/1846: Henry Bantick, Brighton.
16/2/1849: John Bantick, Brighton.
David was a Farmer.
25/12/1854: Ellen Bantick, Brighton.

4/12/1866: David died :
BANTICK- On the 4th inst., at Bagdad, Mr. David Bantick, after a long and painful illness, aged 62.

D Wong on 26th January, 2020 wrote of John Chave:

ld Bailey:
JOHN CHAVE.
Deception: forgery.
7th April 1813
Verdict Guilty > pleaded guilty
Sentence Transportation
JOHN CHAVE was indicted, for that he, on the 16th of February, had in his custody and possession, divers forged bank notes, he knowing them to be forged.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.
Transported for Fourteen Years.

John was born at Tiverton, Devonshire.

10/5/1827: COF

C1827: Had a relationship with Margaret Kelsey (Mary Anne 1822) - no marriage found on the NSW BDM.

1828 Census: John was 52, free by servitude, shoemaker, Windsor.
Mary/Margaret Kelsey, 40, free by servitude.

2/8/1830: aged 56, married Ann Williams.
Children:
1831-1898 Frederick
1833-1833 George

March 1838: John Chave died at Windsor, NSW, aged 64.

Tim Groves on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Mary King:

Married Richard Groves in 1843.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of William Pearce:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 25 January 2020), January 1829, trial of WILLIAM PEARCE (t18290115-85).
WILLIAM PEARCE, Theft > simple larceny, 15th January 1829.

351. WILLIAM PEARCE was indicted for stealing on the 18th of December , 1 stove-grate, value 10s. , the goods of Robert Rayner .

THOMAS RAYNER . I am the son of Robert Rayner , an ironmonger , of Crawford-street . On the 18th of December a little boy came and told me a stove-grate was taken; I had seen it five minutes before - I went out and saw the prisoner with it on the other side of the way; he was quite a stranger: I went to him - he put it down, and ran away; I kept him in sight, and called Stop thief! he was stopped in York-street - I am certain he is the person.

PHILIP WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was in York-street, and heard the cry of Stop thief! I looked towards the sound, and met the prisoner - I took him.

Prisoner. Q. Did you ever see me before? A. Yes, I have.

Prisoner’s Defence. I was walking up Crawford-street, at half-past six o’clock, or a quarter before seven - this stove stood off the edge of the pavement; I stood by it for about five minutes - I was distressed, and took it across the road; they cried Stop thief! and I sat it down; I have had neither father nor mother since I was nine years old.

THOMAS RAYNER re-examined. The stove stood inside a railing; it was four feet six inches from the place he took it - a person must have got over the railing, or hooked it towards him; it was about half-past six o’clock.

GUILTY. Aged 21. Transported for Seven Years .

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 15-16: William Pierce, aged 23, convict; case number 9; disease or hurt, dysentary. Previously had been three months in the hospital hulk at Portsmouth before embarkation. Put on sick list, 27 October 1829 at sea. Discharged 28 November 1829 at Hobart Town.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Charles Hoare:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 13-15: Charles Hoare, aged 17, convict; case number 8; disease or hurt, dysentary. Previously had been three months in the hospital hulk at Portsmouth before embarkation. Put on sick list, 27 October 1829 at sea. Died 4 November 1829.
Folios 22-24: Surgeon’s general remarks.
… The two prisoners who died on the voyage, ...Charles Hoare aged 17 was of a very delicate habit of body having been in the hospital of the hulks three months previous to embarking. The slightest change of weather produced in him an attack of diarrhoea. He like wise suffered dreadfully from seasickness. On the 29th October he complained of being attacked with frequent pinging and griping and severe pain over the abdomen, sickness of stomach great thirst, tongue coated, a clammy moisture on the skin. From his indolent habits and sullen disposition I was frequently necessitated to force the medicine down. He also complained of pain in the right side, to which were applied 24 leeches to the part affected.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Thomas Eyres:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 11-13: Thomas Eyres, aged 46, convict; case number 7; disease or hurt, dysentary. Put on sick list, 20 October 1829 at sea. Died 28 November 1829.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of William Curtis:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 8-11: William Curtis, aged 29, convict; case number 6; disease or hurt, dysentary. Put on sick list, 20 October 1829 at sea. Died 27 October 1829.
Folios 22-24: Surgeon’s general remarks.
… The two prisoners who died on the voyage, the first William Curtis aged 25 was of a very low and desponding state of mind owing principally to his having left a wife and two young children behind him. He suffered this circumstance to operate so powerfully on his mind that it was with the greatest difficulty he could be prevailed upon to take any exercise and I was necessitated to use force to get him on deck when he would observe to me there was nothing the matter. ...

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of William Thornton:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 6-8: William Thornton, aged 27, convict; case number 5; disease or hurt, fever. Put on sick list, 14 October 1829 at sea. Discharged 27 October 1829.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Thomas Perkins:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 3-4: Thomas Perkins, aged 23, convict; case number 3; disease or hurt, fever. Put on sick list, 15 September 1829 at sea. Discharged 7 October 1829.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of William Harman:

National Archives. Reference: ADM 101/71/3 . Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s convict ship Thames for 17 June to 23 November 1829 by Thomas Bell, surgeon and superintendent, during which time the said ship was employed on a voyage to Van Dieman’s Land.

Folios 2-3: William Harman, aged 46, convict; case number 2; disease or hurt, pnemonia. Put on sick list, 9 September 1829 at sea. Discharged 30 September 1829.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Robert Henry Dye:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 25 January 2020), May 1816, trial of ROBERT HENRY DYE (t18160529-22).

ROBERT HENRY DYE, Deception > forgery, 29th May 1816.
497. ROBERT HENRY DYE was indicted for feloniously having in his custody and possession, a forged promissory note, made to the likeness and similitude of the notes issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, he well knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited.
To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY, aged 22.
Transported for Fourteen Years .
First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Henry Dye, aged 33 was also sentenced to 14 years at the Old Bailey on the same date.

https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON13-1-1$init=CON13-1-1p68
Convicts per Elizabeth Henrietta. To Settlement on the Derwent and Port Dalrymple.
Robert Henry Dye, Middx G.D. 29 May 1816, 14 years.
Henry Dye, Middx G.D. 29 May 1816, 14 years.

https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON13-1-1$init=CON13-1-1p71
List of 30 Prisoners. Port Dalrymple.
R.H. Dye, arrived by Sir William Bensley, tried at London, 1816, 14 years.
Date of document: 22 Nov 1817.

Between Thursday evening and Friday morning some daring predators stole the wheels off two carts from the premises of Mr. Peters in Elizabeth-street. Early yesterday morning, owing to a vigilant search by Sergt. Cameron, of the 46th, who resides on the spot, the iron of the wheels was found under the drain communicating with the flour mill, the robbers having burned the timber work in order to elude discovery. Two men have been apprehended on suspicion.
Hobart Town Gazette, 6 Dec 1817.

BENCH OF MAGISTRATES’ PROCEEDINGS.
On Wednesday ... Same day Robert Dye and John Briggs, prisoners, the two men whom we mentioned last week as having been apprehended for stealing the iron-work from Mr. Peter’s carts, were convicted thereof, and sentenced 12 months in the gaol gang.
Hobart Town Gazette, 13 Dec 1817.

Hobart Town Gazette, 11 April 1818
POLICE OFFICE, HOBART TOWN, 9th APRIL 1818.
WHEREAS the Six Convicts hereinafter described did on the Night of Wednesday last, the 8th of this Month, feloniously carry away Two Government Boats from their moorings in Sullivan’s Cove, in the River Derwent, and are now supposed to be lurking about some of the Bays in the lower part of the Harbour. All Constables and others are hereby commanded to use every Exertion in their power to apprehend the said Felons, and lodge them in His Majesty’s Goal at Hobart Town; and all Persons are cautioned not to harbour, maintain, conceal, or in any way aid or comfort the said Felons, on pain of Penalties that will thereon ensue.
Robert Dye, about 5 feet 10 inches high, light complexion, light hair, about 28 years of age, was tried here for stealing four cart wheels from Mr. Peters and burning them, and came from England in the Ship Sir William Bentley, and was sent from Port Jackson to Port Dalrymple in the Brig Elizabeth Henrietta.

The whole of the crown Servants who took away the Government launch on the 8th ult. have been brought in, under an escort of the 48th Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant LEROUX, with the exception of Le Gart; who, we are happy to say, is the only absentee now at large, and who is most probably taken ‘ere this.
Hobart Town Gazette, 16 May 1818.

The prisoners who lately carried away the Government launch from her moorings in the harbour, and who we reported in our last Paper to have been conveyed hither under an escort of the 48th Regiment from Port Dalrymple, were on Saturday last brought before a Bench of Magistrates, and severally convicted and sentenced as follows:- John Briggs, 200 lashes, and 5 years to Newcastle; John Richards, George Edwards, Robert Dye, John Smith, and James Jenkins; 100 lashes each, and 3 years to Newcastle; James Flynn, John Johnson, and David Kelly, 50 lashes each, and 12 months in the Gaol Gang.  The lenity shown the above misguided men, whose daring and atrocious crime might have been made a capital felony, and caused the forfeiture of their lives, we sincerely hope will operate as a warning to others, who may be persuaded to attempts of a similar nature.
Hobart Town Gazette, 23 May 1818.

Maureen Withey on 26th January, 2020 wrote of Sarah Hutchings:

NOTICE.— My Wife, Eliza Kelly, who arrived in this Colony in the Ship Providence, in the name of Sarah Hutchings, having left her home, without any just cause; this is to give notice, that I will not be answerable for any Debt or Debts she may contract, after this notice. D. Kelly.
Murray-street, Nov. 13, 1832.
The Colonist, Fri 23 Nov 1832.

This Could be their marriage: https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD36-1-1p166j2k

At Hobart Town, David Kelly, bachelor, marriage to Eliza Hutchinson (convict)  widow, of this parish, 1 Nov 1826 He signed his name. She put her X.
https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD36-1-1p166j2k

93. Sarah Hutchings, Providence (2) 1826, Tried at Southampton 20 Oct 1825, 7 years. Transported for ? Larceny. Gaol report orderly ?? Stated this offence, convicted with a man named Philip Hutchings for stealing ten sovereigns from a man’s person. Widow, 3 children.
Offences, etc.:
Supreme Court Hobart, 24 July 1849, Transported for 7 years. Transported for stealing a Coat 15 months Female house of Correction Cascades, 4/8/49.
19/11/50 T.of L. refused. Not eligible, 5/8/51.
July 15/57, (Hospital) Absent without leave, 2 months hard labor. Appd. 18/7/57.
Not eligible for a TL. 4/11/57. Not eligible for T.L. 23/12/57.

Eliza Kelly, and William. McKay, tailor, were then indicted with stealing on the l3th ultimo, from one Jonathan McKatta, residing in Richmond, a great coat valued at 10s., a shirt valued at 1s, and a night cap valued at 6d. The prisoners pleaded Not Guilty, and were defended by C. B. Brewer, Esquire.  From the evidence it was proved that on the evening in question McKatta was at Mr. Bastian’s house in Elizabeth-street drinking in a room adjoining the bar, where the defendants were also present, and that their conversation turning upon a subject which was uninteresting to the prosecutor, he immediately quitted the apartment, and on the cessation of voices, returned to the room when he missed the articles.  Neil Bastian deposed that no other parties had entered the house excepting the defendants at the bar, and upon their going out he remarked McKay had a small bundle, and the female prisoner appeared rather bulky as if something was concealed under her mantilla or shawl. Detective Constable Withers deposed to having apprehended both prisoners at the residence of McKay in Patrick-street, and when accused of the robbery, McKay said “Well you know, we must be roguish occasionally.”  Witness conveyed him to the chief police station, and on the Monday following, which was the 2nd July instant, he (Withers) returned to McKay’s house, and arrested Eliza Kelly as an accomplice. A female named Ann Morgan, being sworn, stated that on the evening of the 30th ultimo her mistress returned home, and instructed her to hang the coat up in the shop with other articles for sale.  Mr. Brewer ably exerted himself in an eloquent appeal, in which he endeavoured to exculpate his clients, but the case appearing clear against them, the jury, after the summing up of His Honor, almost immediately returned a verdict of Guilty against both, when they were remanded for sentence;
Hobarton Guardian, 28 July 1849.

The following prisoners were then placed at the bar, to receive their sentences :
... and Eliza Kelly for stealing a coat, shirt, and a night-cap, the property of Jonathan Mckatta - were each sentenced to be transported for the term of seven years.
Colonial Times, 27 July 1849

Vicki on 25th January, 2020 wrote of James Dent:

James Dent’s descendants DNA has matched descendants of the Dunt family of Essex.
James Dents father was Samuel Dunt and mother Mary Cooper from Halstead Essex.
A document was later found that had confirmed the surname DUNT. The baptismal record of Sarah Dunt who was born on 14 August 1806 in Marylebone, Middlesex, the daughter of Harriott and James

D Wong on 25th January, 2020 wrote of William Lester:

Native Place: Essex.

William was illiterate, protestant, a widower, no children listed, he was 5’2½” tall, dark sallow complexion, brown and thin in front hair, blue eyes, lost a front tooth left side of upper jaw, scar back of forefinger of right hand, two scars back of middle finger of left hand.

Neil Motteram on 25th January, 2020 wrote of William Lester:

Ticket of leave notified in Govt Gazette 6 May 1840. See The Sydney Monitor and Commercial Advertiser (NSW : 1838 - 1841)  Mon 11 May 1840 Page 6 CONTENTS OF THE GOVERNMENT GAZETTE.

Greg Petersen on 25th January, 2020 wrote of John Ray:

born Sussex, England 1792, John Ray, one of 369 convicts transported on the ship ‘Dromedary’, 11 September 1819.
Sentence details: Convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery for a term of life. Married Jane Homewood and had one son Nicholas Homewood Ray, born 10th December 1825 in Hobart, died 2nd August 1880 aged 54. Jane Homewood (Ray) died 19th December 1864.

Maureen Withey on 25th January, 2020 wrote of David Kelly:

Irish Convict Database.
David Kelly, age 18, ship, Chapman (1) 1817, Tried at Dublin City 1816, sentence 7 years. Native of Dublin, trade - Shoemaker apprentice.

Tasmanian Conduct Record: https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON31-1-23$init=CON31-1-23p179
7. David Kelly. Chapsman & Jupiter. Tried Feby. 1816, 7 years.
March 18 1822. T.L. Drunk & Disy. Fied 5/-
July 8 1822. T.L. Absent from muster & church. Repd. Aug 6 1822. T.L. Absent from muster & church. Repd.
Oct 8 1829. Selling rum without a licence- fined £50 with costs.
Oct 10 1833. F.S. Drunk, fined 5/-.

The following letter from David Kelly, in respect to the last charge on his record, appeared in the Hobart Town Courier, 7 Nov 1829.

To the Editor of the Courier :
SIR.- I beg to communicate to the Public, through the medium of your Journal, the following particulars of a circumstance which has led to my being convicted of retailing Rum, which charge, I call my Maker to witness my total innocence of. The following is a true and correct account of all the particulars relative to the case.
On the 17th of August last, Samuel May, attached to the Field Police, called at my house, leading a horse, having a girth in his hand which he requested I would repair; I complied, and when finished he seemed inclined to prolong his stay, asserting that he was waiting for a young man, who as well as himself was in quest of a young horse which had left the establishment of his master, Mr. Hobbs, whose overseer he represented himself to be ; during which lime, my dinner being ready, I invited him to partake, which he did. We conversed on many different subjects, and I solemnly declare that spirits of any kind or wine was never mentioned. Before we finished dinner the other person had arrived, who I immediately recognized to be Benjamin Allinson, of the Oatland Police ; having alighted he very abruptly entered the house, and wished to force his way to the fire but perceiving he had no very welcome reception he retired to a seat, apparently much confused ; he was asked to eat, which he refused, he remained in my house the remainder of the dinner time, which was about ten minutes, they then both departed. I here again solemnly declare that during the stay of Benjamin Allinson no conversation door place respecting spirits or wine of any kind. It may be proper to remark that from the time that Samuel May entered my house to the time of his leaving, with Benjamin Allinson, there was no other person in but myself and my wife. I heard no more of them until the 2nd September, when, to my surprise, I received a summons to appear at Campbell town on the 5th September, charged with having retailed one quart of wine on the 17th August last. Knowing my innocence of the charge. I was almost petrified with astonishment and surprise, and tracing back to the date, could remember of no other person having entered my house on that day but Samuel May and Benjamin Allinson, I therefore concluded that they must be the authors of this information. Having no other person in the house during their stay, I was completely at a loss how to act. There was no other resource but to request the attendance of my neighbours, who were all willing to give such evidence, as to character and conduct, that they considered me entitled to. At length the appointed day arrived for my appearance at Campbell town. I accordingly went, accompanied by several respectable persons, to answer to this charge, and was informed that the parties who were against me had not yet arrived, but was requested to wait in attendance a short time. I complied, and the parties not appearing, was told by the Magistrate that should they have to summons me again they would give me timely notice. On the 23rd Sept. I received another summons, similar to the first, to appear on the 8th Oct. I procured a summons for each of my witnesses. I accordingly appeared again at Campbell town, when, to my astonishment, I was furnished by the Police Clerk with a third summons - differing materially from the two former - charged with having retailed half a pint of Rum on the 7th August, the Clerk alleged that it was a mistake-a very singular mistake indeed, a mistake both in quantity and quality but I trust ere long I shall be enabled to ascertain whether or no such mistakes are legal. Observe how the affair began, to shew itself even before the investigation took place. Having appeared before the Magistrate, I found the informer was Dudfield, of the Oatland Police, with Samuel May and Benjamin Allinson. May being sworn, declared upon oath that, on the 17th August last. I sold him half a pint of rum, and Allinson also declared upon oath that he drank part of the said half pint of rum, and saw me receive the money from May for the same. Reader, whoever thou art, picture to yourself the indescribable state of my feelings at hearing two men declare upon oath that they had bought and drank Rum in my house, while I call my God to witness that I have never had any rum in my house since I have occupied it, a period of 13 months. I called upon my witnesses who all spoke much in my favour, the substance of their evidence was, that they considered me a very sober and industrious man and so far from being a grog seller that they never knew or heard of any thing of the kind, in fact it was their general opinion that the information was founded in falsehood. The result of the trial was, that I was fined in the full penalty of £50 by Richard Willis and James Simpson, Esqs, but, however, I have secured an appeal, when, I trust, the affair will wear a very different aspect.
The same two characters, Samuel May and Benjamin Allinson, had given an information against another person, which was tried on the same day as mine, but dismissed, their evidence being contradicted.
DAVID KELLY.
Macquarie River, Oct. 9,1829.

Maureen Withey on 25th January, 2020 wrote of David Kelly:

Tasmanian Conduct Record: https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON31-1-23$init=CON31-1-23p181
13. David Kelly. Fanny and Emu. Tried 1815. 7 years.
Sept 3 1817. Neglect of Duty. To work for Govt. in his own time one week.Sept 19 1817. Neglect of Duty- to keep stock for Govt. in his own time one week.
May 16 1818. Felony. Taking away a boat called a Launch together with all her sails &c, & a smaller boat, both the propy. Of the Crown. - 50 Lashes & 12 months G.Gang.
May 16 1821. Absent from muster for Church. Repd.

The taking of the government launch was reported as follows in the newspapers:
Hobart Town Gazette, 11 April 1818
POLICE OFFICE, HOBART TOWN, 9th APRIL 1818.
WHEREAS the Six Convicts hereinafter described did on the Night of Wednesday last, the 8th of this Month, feloniously carry away Two Government Boats from their moorings in Sullivan’s Cove, in the River Derwent, and are now supposed to be lurking about some of the Bays in the lower part of the Harbour. All Constables and others are hereby commanded to use every Exertion in their power to apprehend the said Felons, and lodge them in His Majesty’s Goal at Hobart Town; and all Persons are cautioned not to harbour, maintain, conceal, or in any way aid or comfort the said Felons, on pain of Penalties that will thereon ensue.

The men were recaptured and punished.:
The whole of the crown Servants who took away the Government launch on the 8th ult. have been brought in, under an escort of the 48th Regiment, commanded by Lieutenant LEROUX, with the exception of Le Gart; who, we are happy to say, is the only absentee now at large, and who is most probably taken ‘ere this.
Hobart Town Gazette, 16 May 1818.

The prisoners who lately carried away the Government launch from her moorings in the harbour, and who we reported in our last Paper to have been conveyed hither under an escort of the 48th Regiment from Port Dalrymple, were on Saturday last brought before a Bench of Magistrates, and severally convicted and sentenced as follows:- John Briggs, 200 lashes, and 5 years to Newcastle; John Richards, George Edwards, Robert Dye, John Smith, and James Jenkins; 100 lashes each, and 3 years to Newcastle; James Flynn, John Johnson, and David Kelly, 50 lashes each, and 12 months in the Gaol Gang.  The lenity shown the above misguided men, whose daring and atrocious crime might have been made a capital felony, and caused the forfeiture of their lives, we sincerely hope will operate as a warning to others, who may be persuaded to attempts of a similar nature.
Hobart Town Gazette, 23 May 1818.

However, the report of 11 April 1818, lists six men involved, including:
David Kelly, 5 feet 1 inch high, dark complexion, brown hair, brown eyes, 17 years of age, by trade a Shoemaker, tried in Dublin in February 1816, transported for 7 years, came from England in the Chapman and here in the Jupiter, and was born in Dublin.

This David Kelly, who was transported on Chapman, has no mention of the incident on his record, so it appears that a mistake was made by the police in advertising for the wrong David Kelly.

D Wong on 25th January, 2020 wrote of Isaac Heywood:

3/11/1818 Manchester Mercury Lancashire, England:
Isaac Heywood, for stealing wearing apparel from M. Corwall.

Ancestry Convict Indents:
Per ‘Canada’ 1819.

Occupation: Cotton Dyer.

Isaac was listed as 17 years old, 5’2½” tall, dark ruddy complexion, dark brown hair, dark eyes.

8/11/1825: COF
13/7/1826: COF renewed
1/6/1835: COF renewed.

Isaac was then convicted in South Australia in 1841 - arrived back in NSW per ‘Emma’ from South Australia, then sent to Norfolk Island and then sent to VDL per ‘Duke of Richmond’ in 1844.

5/11/1841 Southern Australian, Adelaide, SA:

Isaac Clough was next put to the bar for stealing a fowl, the property of Thomas Higgins, and pleaded not guilty.
The prisoner was undefended by counsel. Several witnesses were examined, and the jury returned a verdict of guilty.
Sentence—transportation for seven years.

Ancestry Convict Indents:
Isaac Clough alias Wm. Hayward was listed as 42 years old on arrival in NSW - he arrived from Adelaide, SA. per ‘Emma’.

Isaac was illiterate, protestant, single, 5’3” tall, dark sallow complexion, brown hair, dark hazel eyes, nose broad, man, woman, sprig, M.I +DAS and anchor, inside lower right arm, mermaid, blue streak inside lower left arm, two scars inside left wrist, large scar on back of left thumb. 
Was originally transported by the ‘Canada’ (5) in 1819, for 7 years, in the name of Isaac Heywood.

5/4/1851 Launceston Examiner, Tas:
Isaac Clough indicted for stealing on the 17th March, two blankets of the value of 10s., and one rug of the value of 2s., the property of W. Booth.
Verdict guilty. Sentenced to seven years transportation.

30/9/1854: (Newspaper date) TOL

11/6/1856 The Cornwall Chronicle, Launceston:
STABBING.___A man named Isaac Clough was apprehended in Brisbane-street, on Monday, for being drunk.  On taking him to the watch-house the constables noticed that he had been stabbed in the back, through his waistcoat and shirt;  he had no coat on.  He refused to state who he had been quarrelling with.  The landlord of the “Robin Hood and Little John,” where he had been drinking, said he believed that the only way he could have got the wound was by falling on some broken bottles in the yard.  Yesterday morning Clough was fined for drunkenness;  he still stated that he could remember nothing about any one stabbing or assaulting him.

17/2/1859: Fined for being drunk and disorderly.

17/12/1860: Fined 10s., for being drunk, Launceston.

No date of death found.

Charmaine Hardy on 25th January, 2020 wrote of John Chave:

Married Ann Smith (nee Williams aka Fishburn)  2 Aug 1830, Windsor, New South Wales.

D Wong on 25th January, 2020 wrote of George Southam:

6/2/1841 Yorkshire Gazette Yorkshire, England:
Suspicious Character.—On Saturday night, a man who gave his name George Southam, about 21 years of age, was received into custody at Leeds gaol under suspicious circumstances. He was dressed in a woman’s gown, apron, and cloak, with a black beaver bonnet and cap.  It seems that the prisoner had come down by the railway train as far as Oakenshaw, when he got out ad went into the gentlemen’s retiring room instead of the ladies’ room.  On reseating himself he was told that he had got upon the train for York instead of that for Leeds, and in changing his seat he demeaned himself so unseemly that his sex and disguise were suspected, and one of the policemen on eyeing him closely observed his trowsers and heavy boots below the skirts of his gown.
He was accordingly escorted to Leeds and given into custody.  We understand that he has since confessed that he belongs to Killingworth, Warwickshire, and that he had been in custody at Rugby on several charges of horse stealing, and that he had been committed for trial at the Warwickshire assizes, but that before his removal he effected his escape and ran home, where he arrived even before his father and mother, who had been attending his final examination, and immediately put on his mother’s apparel, and set off to see a relative near Hunslet;  but on his way was apprehended.  He stands remanded until his identity be established.
9/4/1841 Coventry Herald Warwickshire, England:
LAW INTELLIGENCE
George Southam, for horse stealing, at King’s Newnham, ten years’ transportation.

http://foundersandsurvivors.org/pubsearch/convict/chain/ai66634
George Southam was listed as 21 years old on arrival.

Place of Birth: Near Rugby.

Transported for ‘Having stolen horses in his possession’.

George was literate, single, protestant, 5’4½” tall, fresh complexion, sandy hair, dark brown whiskers, dark blue eyes.

Father: Basil
Mother: Ann
Brothers: Basil, Edward, Mark, Thomas, John.
Sisters: Betsey, Mary, Ann, Rebecca and 1 other.

https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON33-1-11$init=CON33-1-11p174
17/11/1846: TOL
30/1/1849: CP

Iris Dunne on 25th January, 2020 wrote of George Minns:

Bound Indenture No. 192, Convict No. 34/1398aged 22, convicted 21 Oct. 1833, No previous convictions, Est. birth year abt. 1811, can read & write, Protestant, Single, Trade: Waterman & Porter, Crime House Breaking

Kevin Simpson on 25th January, 2020 wrote of George Minns:

UK, Register of Duties Paid for Apprentices’ Indentures, 1710-1811

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