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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Shackleton:

John SHACKLETON was convicted at Lancaster, England on 11 April 1842 for Larceny - stealing cotton cloth. Previous convictions. 10yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Marquis of Hastings’ arriving 8 Nov 1842.

Aged 40 yrs; married man; drover & waggoner; Protestant; can read’ 5’9 1/4”; fresh complexion; brown hair; Hazel eyes; stout; lost part of a finger.
Native place of Birth:Yorkshire, England.
VDL:
2 and half years Probation Period.
Assigned to work service.

23 May 1848: Ticket of Leave granted.
15 Oct 1850: Conditional Pardon approved.
4 June 1852: Free Certificate issued.

Application for Permission to Marry:
16 Apr 1850: Margaret BUTLER (per ‘Tasmania’) to John SHACKLETON (per ‘Marquis of Hastings’). Approved. (ref. 52/1/3 pg 411)

Marriage:
24 May 1850 Margaret BUTLER, aged 35yrs, servant to John SHACKLETON, aged 42yrs, labourer at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Hobart, Tas. (ref. 37/1/9 no. 499)

5 Dec 1852: John SHACKLETON left VDL per ship ‘Clarence’ from Launceston to Melbourne, Victoria. (Ship to Colony - Marquis of Hastings). ref. 220/1/2 pg 261)  Date of return not noted.

Margaret BUTLER died on 4 Nov 1855, aged 31yrs. Cause of death - fractures & contusions. Her husband John SHACKLETON was gaoled for her manslaughter.

7 Nov 1855: Inquest into the death of Margaret SHACKLETON (Butler). (ref. SC195/1/37 no. 3649)

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

Application for Permission to Marry:
16 Apr 1850: Margaret BUTLER (per ‘Tasmania’) to John SHACKLETON (per ‘Marquis of Hastings’). Approved. (ref. 52/1/3 pg 411)

Marriage:
24 May 1850 Margaret BUTLER, aged 35yrs, servant to John SHACKLETON, aged 42yrs, labourer at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Hobart, Tas. (ref. 37/1/9 no. 499)

Margaret BUTLER died on 4 Nov 1855, aged 31yrs. Cause of death - fractures & contusions. Her husband John SHACKLETON was gaoled for her manslaughter.

7 Nov 1855: Inquest into the death of Margaret SHACKLETON (Butler). (ref. SC195/1/37 no. 3649)

Children:
William BUTLER admitted to Queens Orphan School on 9 Dec 1845 aged 10yrs.  Discharged on 17 Jan 1847 to Rev. Richard Walsh, Geelong, Victoria.

Mary Ann BUTLER admitted to Queens Orphan School on 14 May 1846 aged 2 yrs. Discharged 10 June 1851 to her mother.  Readmitted on 7 Dec 1855 following the death of her mother.  Discharged on 7 Jan 1859 to Mrs. Mary O’Boyle of Hobart. (Ref. SWD7, 28, CSD 1/71/1818)

Terry M Walsh on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Catherine Condon:

Arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on 24 Feb 1853 and was later assigned to Charles Wilcock, Clarence Plains.

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

Aged 22 yrs; single woman; farm servant; 5’1”; brown complexion; black hair; dk brown eyes;Roman Catholic.
Native place: Carlow, Ireland.
Brothers: Richard & James
Sisters: Biddy & Mary

VDL:
6mths Probation Period. Station Gang: ‘Anson’ Hulk.

23 Dec 1852: Free Certificate issued.

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Tucker:

John Tucker was tried in London in 1789, aged about 30, for ‘stealing various items including 490 yards of linen’. He was on board the ship ‘Active’.  His step-mother, Mary Tucker was transported on the Neptune in 1790, for ‘receiving some of the stolen property’.
Soon after arrival he was assigned to the Sydney Commissariat as an assistant storekeeper.

In 1794 he married Ann Viles/Vales, the widow of Nicholas Viles/Vales who died in 1792. Ann was transported along with Nicholas on the Royal Admiral 1792.  Their 2 children, Ann and Sarah were with them, Ann died in 1792 and Sarah in 1793.
John and Ann had two children while in Sydney, John jnr born in 1795 and Charlotte in 1797.

In 1803 John Tucker was promoted to the position of storekeeper with an annual salary of £50. In 1804 he was appointed as the first storekeeper at Newcastle, sacked in 1805 and reappointed in 1807.
He was allowed to take up land on the Paterson River about 1812.
In 1823 John retired from his position in Newcastle and moved to his land at Paterson’s Plains that he named ‘Albion Farm’.

23/6/1834: John died at Albion Farm - Ann died in 1839.  Both are buried at ‘Albion Farm’.

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Ann Viles:

James Cutler, Nicholas Viles and his wife, Ann, were transported for receiving 5 coats, 56 waistcoats, and a great quantity of other wearing apparel, knowing it to be stolen.
No ship found for James Cutler. Nicholas was sentenced to transportation for life but was repreived to 14 years, the same as Ann.

Nicholas and Ann and their 2 daughters, Ann Vales died 1792, and Sarah Vales died 1793 were all on board the ‘Royal Admiral’.

After Nicholas died in 1792, Ann married John Tucker (Active 1791) in 1794. They had 2 children, John jnr born in 1795 and Charlotte in 1797.

John Tucker had land at Paterson’s Plains which he named ‘Albion Farm’.

John and Ann died at Albion Farm in 1834 and 1839 respectively and are buried there.

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

n.b. There are two persons named Margaret BUTLER on this voyage of the ‘Tasmania’ 1845. This Margaret is Identifier 2.

Margaret BUTLER was convicted at Carlow, Ireland, with other persons, on 2 April 1845 for stealing potatoes. 7yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Tasmania’ arriving 3 Dec 1845.

Widow, 2 children - on board this ship with her.
Aged 40yrs; farm servant; 5’3 3/4”; fresh complexion; brown hair; grey eyes; Roman Catholic; can read.
Native place of birth: Carlow, Ireland.

VDL:
The children, William & Mary Ann BUTLER were both admitted to the Queens Orphanage at New Town near Hobart (as was the requirement by the Govt) in 1845.

Margaret Butler was stationed at the ‘Anson’ Hulk.
Clear Conduct record.
3 July 1849: Ticket of Leave granted.
25 May 1852: Free Certificate issued.

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Thomas Kelly:

Thomas Kelly was listed as 56 years old on arrival - he was born in County Limerick and transported for ‘Rape on my step daughter Catherine Downey, 18 years of age, he denies the offence’.

Thomas was 5’3 1/2” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, dark brown to grey whiskers, grey eyes, reads and writes a little, married with 4 children, protestant, left leg scarred on the shin.

Occupation: Reed maker/weaver.

5/12/1854: TOL
25/11/1856: CP

25/12/1855: Permission to marry Mary Murphy (Anna Maria 1852)

14/1/1856: Married at St Johns Church, Newtown, Hobart. He was listed as 55 a widower and Mary as 50 years old widow.

Deaths listed: 18/7/1858 at Bagdad, aged 70, a labourer, died from natural causes.

15/7/1869: At Hobart, aged 80, Labourer, died of old age and debility.

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

n.b. There are two persons named Margaret BUTLER on the voyage of the ‘Tasmania’ 1845.

Margaret BUTLER was convicted at Carlow, Ireland on 17 Oct 1844 for Larceny - stealing 8yds of cashmere. 7 yr transportation sentence - sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Tasmania’ arriving 3 Dec 1845.

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Murphy:

Mary Murphy was listed as being 50 years old on arrival in VDL, she was born in Selkirk, Scotland.

Prior convictions: 4 times in prison before.

Mary was 5’3” tall, hair turning grey, grey eyes, can read and write, protestant married with 3 children.

13/6/1854: TOL

25/12/1855: Permission to marry Thomas Kelly ‘Ratcliffe 1845’

14/1/1856: Married Thomas Kelly ‘Ratcliffe 1845’ He was listed as 55 a widower and Mary as 50 years old widow at St Johns church, Newtown, Hobart.

27/4/1858: Free Certificate.

Phil Hands on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Thomas Mortlock:

Tried and convicted on the 1st December 1832 at the Essex Assizes, Thomas and another, John Hardy, were tried and convicted of breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Smith, at Ridgewell, and stealing 10 watches, value 20 pounds, a large quantity of jewellery and other property, and 15 pounds in money. John Hardy was acquitted but Thomas was found guilty and sentenced to death. This sentence was later commuted to 14 years transportation.
Left England on 5th May 1833.
Ship:- the ‘Captain Cook’ sailed with 230 male convicts on board of which 4 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 26th August 1833.
His shipping indent papers give the following information:-
Age: 18 years, Native place: Essex, Trade or calling: Farm labourer, Religion: Protestant, Height: 5’ 4 1/2 “.
Complexion: Ruddy, Hair: Brown, Eyes: Hazel, Marks: Small mole right side of upper lip, Could read and write.
On his arrival in the colony, Thomas was assigned to Patrick Dyce, a farmer, at “Tillygrieg”, Gundaroo NSW.

Trial of Thomas Mortlock
from the Essex Standard December 1832:
House Breaking
Thomas Mortlock, 17, and John Hardy, 18, were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Smith, at Ridgewell, and stealing ten watches, value 20 pounds, a large quantity of jewellery and other property, and 15 pounds in money. The Prosecutor was so very deaf that a person was obliged to be sworn to interpret by means of writing the questions and answers. He stated that on the 22nd of October he left his house about 10 o’clock having fastened up the doors and windows. On his return at six, he found the back window broken, and the back door standing open. A box in which he had put 27 watches, was broken open, and 10 of them taken away nine of them being silver and 1 gilt. A bureau was also broken open and 7 sovereigns and 3 half sovereigns and 7 pounds 10 shillings in silver stolen, 3 brooches, an earring and about 14 shillings in halfpence were likewise taken away. Witness knew the prisoners, but had never seen either of them in the neighborhood of his house.
Isaac Ward lived opposite the prosecutor’s house; on the 22nd of October he saw the prisoner Mortlock, whom he had previously known, coming away from the premises adjoining Smith’s, his boots were unlaced, and his hat over his eyes, which induced witness to remark at that time that he thought he had been committing a robbery Robert Allen, an accomplice, said, that about two o’clock in the afternoon of the 22nd of October, he saw Mortlock at Toppesfield; Mortlock treated with a pint of beer; whilst they were drinking it, Mortlock invited witness and Hardy to go with him to Hedingham.
They started, and on the road. Mortlock showed him a watch, saying it was his brother’s and he wished to sell it. Neither of them would buy it; they then went to five or six public-houses, and when witness had spent all his money, Mortlock agreed to lend him a sovereign, to be repaid in a month, Mortlock got so drunk that witness was obliged to lead him home, and by the way he told witness that he had broken into Smith’s house, at Ridgewell, and stolen watches and money. Witness observed, he would tell of him. To which Mortlock made no reply.
He afterwards asked Hardy and witness to take the things he had stolen, but they both declined. Hardy and witness afterwards followed him into a wood belonging to Mr. Hill, and saw Mortlock take the watches and money out of the bank, and go into a field some distance off, and hide them in another bank near an ash tree. Two days afterwards witness was taken up on the charge of committing the robbery and he then told where Mortlock had hidden the property.
Charles Bradley, son-in-law of the prosecutor, went in consequence of information received from Allen, to the field mentioned by him; Allen there pointed out a place near an ash tree, where he found nine watches, two sovereigns, two half sovereigns, and some silver. They were tied up in three separate pocket-handkerchiefs, and covered over with dry grass. (The property was produced, and witness identified one of the watches as belonging to the prosecutor.) The prosecutor identified the whole of the watches as belonging to his customers, who had sent them to be repaired.
Mortlock said that Allen’s story was a fabrication. Hardy called Allen, who said that he was with him all day, and that he took no part in the robbery. – Hardy was acquitted. Mortlock guilty. - Death recorded.

Thomas was granted a Ticket of Leave, No. 1651/40, dated 1st August 1840 and further to that he was granted a Ticket of Leave Passport, No. 528/1843, dated 20th April 1843.

In 1843 he was listed as a laborer employed by Henry Clarke, tenant at “Fairfield” between Gundaroo and Bellmount Forest. On his Ticket of Leave Passport No 528 dated 20th April 1843 and on the recommendation of Queanbeyan Bench dated 8th March 1843 states, in the service of John Pethick (Pethwick) of ‘Maneroo’ for 12 months.
Thomas was granted his Provisional Pardon; this freed him from all obligation of the remainder of his sentence. Thomas worked as a farm laborer and a shepherd, when he met and married free settler Catherine Herbert at Majors Creek on the 28th September 1852, they had 9 children between 1853-1875.

He received a land grant on the 23rd January 1873 at a cost of 320 pounds. He later sold this acreage two and a half years later to a William Cosgrove who owned all the land surrounding property.

Thomas died on 28th January 1879 at Murrumbucca, NSW

The Manaro Mercury, and Cooma and Bombala Advertiser (NSW ), Saturday 1 February 1879
Obituary:-
The late Thomas Mortlock.
We regret to record the death of a genial, well respected, and old resident of Manaro, Mr. Thomas Mortlock, a native of Essex, England, after reaching a good age, 63 years. He departed this life at Murrumbucca on Tuesday last, to the sorrow of his widow and a family of nine (three daughters and six sons), and a large circle of friends. Thirty-nine years ago, the late Mr. Thomas Mortlock came to the district of Cooma, where he had resided almost continuously ever since. Many of his intimate friends attended the funeral on Thursday. Deaceased’s remains were interred in the Church of England burial-ground at Christchurch. Over the grave, the impressive and solemn ritual of the Church of England was read by the Rev. Canon Druitt.

Phil Hands on 26th April, 2017 wrote of George Mealmaker:

George Mealmaker was political transportee, he was born on 10th February 1768 at Dundee, Scotland, the son of John Mealmaker, weaver, and his wife Alison, (née Auchinleck). He came from a humble background but won modest affluence as a hand-loom weaver. He was a pioneer, active and extreme member of the ‘Friends of Liberty’ in Dundee early in 1791, a group formed to uphold the principles of the French revolution. In mid-1793 he wrote a broadsheet, inveighing against the ‘despotism and tyranny’ of the British government, and it was for publishing this that Thomas Palmer was transported. George attended the convention at Edinburgh late in 1793, after which Maurice Margarot,  Joseph Gerrald and William Skirving also met this fate. In the next months George was secretary of the Dundee friends, who spread propaganda urging the militia not to fight against France. For this he was brought before the magistrates but no charge was laid against him.
Radical activity quietened in the next two years, although he himself remained outspoken, he was quick to join the ‘United Scotsmen’, who in 1796 began to organize in imitation of their Irish namesakes. Indeed George wrote the group’s constitution, which asserted its ‘whole aim’ to be ‘to secure Annual Parliaments and Universal Suffrage’; he also published ‘The Moral and Political Catechism of Man’ (Edinburgh, 1797), which expounded such radicalism at length. Authority reacted, and in January 1798 Mealmaker was tried for sedition and administering unlawful oaths. After a prejudiced hearing in which the two charges were not distinguished he was sentenced to transportation for fourteen years.
George arrived in Sydney in the ‘Royal Admiral’ on 20th November 1800. He may at first have upheld his political interests, and in March 1802 rumours of convict rebellion involved him; but he denied the allegation and went unpunished. It was his craft, not his beliefs, which shaped his life in New South Wales.
After becoming governor in 1800,  Philip Gidley King had tried to establish a weaving industry but found no suitable manager. In August 1803 he appointed George for four years. Supervising the work at the Female Factory, Parramatta, (where he may have met convict Mary Thomas (‘Glatton’ 1803) forming a defacto relationship that was to produced 2 children), he put four looms to work, and King’s accounts of the industry tell a thorough success story.
George received a conditional pardon and generous emoluments. However, his life ended unhappily. Governor William Bligh   cared less about weaving than did King. In December 1807 fire partly destroyed the factory. On 30th March 1808 George, destitute and apparently a drunkard, died from alcoholic suffocation and was buried at St John’s, Parramatta. There his son by Mary Thomas had been baptized in 1805. Colonial life had ruined this forceful, self-assertive, interesting man.

On 23rd November 1795 at Dundee, George had married Marjory, daughter of John Thoms. She never left Dundee and died there on 16th November 1843, aged 68.

Iris Dunne on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Thomas Denning:

There are also references in the Macarthur Files, which I believe are locked up in the National Library private archives and access can only be obtained with permission from a Macarthur Ancestor. There are also references in the JOHNS Family Tree. From Larene O’Neill

Baldwin Hamey on 26th April, 2017 wrote of William Vyse:

The William who died in New York on 29 December 1843 was the son of Thomas Vyse and only 33 years old, so not the William who was convicted of receiving stolen property (obit in The Times 16/01/1844)

Laurence Macintyre on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Murphy:

The following article appears in the Glasgow Herald on 25 April 1851:-

“AYR CIRCUIT COURT

Mary Murphy or Currie, charged with the theft of three hens, from the farm of Dykesmains, near Ardrossan, in January, previously convicted, pleaded guilty; and was sentenced to be transported for seven years.”

Ardrossan is a coastal town in the County of Ayr. Dykesmains Farm today (25/4/2017) would be considered to be in the town of Saltcoats but still in the Parish of Ardrossan.

Larene O'Neill on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Thomas Denning:

This person is MY Ancestor.
The first Denning in my Denning Family tree, to arrive in Australia.
Thomas Denning b. Circa 1791, d. 1.10.1862,
buried. 3.10.1862 at Wesleyan Cemetery, now Parramtta North Methodist Cemetery, Walter Lawry Park.
Thomas married Mary Johns, 10.6.1816, and they had 11 Children.
Their Children (in order): Edward, Thomas, Mary, John, Benjamin, Elizabeth ‘Eliza’, Mary Anne, Jane, and Twins William and James, last child was Stephen.
The Children were named after John Macarthurs family names and Births were kept in a Register on the Macarthur property.
Of the 11 children : 3 died young - Mary a.3, Jane a. 11, Stephen a. 2.
Both Mary and Thomas worked for John Macarthur. Mary for Mrs Macarthur in the house Parramatta and Thomas for John Macarthur as his Principal Overseer of Camden properties.

My connection is :
(Gt Gt Gt Grandfather) Thomas Denning, Three Bees.
(Gt Gt Grandfather) Edward Denning, Son of Thomas Denning
(Gt Grandfather) George Denning, Son of Edward Denning
(Grandfather) Garnet Denning, Son of George Denning
(Mother) Gwen Denning, Daughter of Garnet Denning
Larene O’Neill = Me ! Daughter of Gwen Denning

I have spent many years working on my Family Tree and have only just returned to it this year now retired.

D Wong on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Nicholas Viles:

James Cutler, Nicholas Viles and his wife, Ann, were transported for receiving 5 coats, 56 waistcoats, and a great quantity of other wearing apparel, knowing it to be stolen.
No ship found for James Cutler. Nicholas was sentenced to transportation for life but was repreived to 14 years, the same as Ann.

Nicholas and Ann and their 2 daughters, Ann Vales died 1792, and Sarah Vales died 1793 were all on board the ‘Royal Admiral’.

After Nicholas died in 1792, Ann married John Tucker (Active 1791) in 1794. They had 2 children, John jnr. born in 1795 and Charlotte in 1797.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Maria Lawler:

8 Jan 1850: Application for Permission to Marry:
Maria LAWLER (per Flying Fish ship) to Thomas BETTANY (per William Miles ship). (ref. 52/1/3 pg 24). Approved.

28 Jan 1850: Marriage - Maria LAWLER, aged 32, widow, work woman to Thomas BATTENY (BETTANY), aged 37, shepherd, bachelor. At St. Lukes Church, Campbell Town, Tasmania. (ref. 37/1/9 no. 15)
 
Husband Thomas BETTENY was transported in 1828 for housebreaking and a known thief. He received his Ticket of Leave and lived in the Campbell Town district. He died aged 90 yrs. (ref. 35/1/68 no. 92)

No record located yet for Maria’s death or what happened with her family.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Maria Lawler:

Maria LAWLER arrived free as an immigrant to Port Phillip, Victoria per the ship ‘Gilmore’ in 1840 - with her husband Sylvester LAWLER.

Maria was convicted at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia on 9 Sept 1845 for stealing wearing apparel. 7 yr transportation sentence and sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Flying Fish’ arriving 29 Dec 1845.

Married woman.  Husband Sylvester LAWLER.
3 children - 2 at Kilkenny, Ireland and 1 with husband at Geelong, Vctoria.
Aged 25yrs; Roman Catholic; 4’11”; servant.
Place of Birth: Co. Kilkenny, Ireland.
Mother: Kathryn
Sisters: Kath & Margaret
Brothers: James Kelly

Colony of VDL:
6 mth Probation Period.
3 July 1849: Ticket of Leave granted.
30 Aug 1855: Certificate of Freedom issued, at Campbell Town, Tasmania.

Averil Douglas on 25th April, 2017 wrote of John Jacobs:

He was the fourth child (second son) of eight children born to Isaac Jacobs and his wife Mary (nee MacCreath).  Isaac Jacobs (1759-1835) was the only son of Lazarus Jacobs and his wife Mary Hiscock.  Lazarus Jacobs was a glassmaker and he and Isaac developed the process of manufacturing the famous Bristol Blue Glass. John Jacobs often accompanied shipments of glass around the world as the firm made glassware for all the royal houses of Europe.  His occupation is listed as ‘Supercargo’ a term used to describe a person overseeing shipments on board ship.  He looked after the glassware shipment on board ship and through to its ultimate destination.  It was on three of those trips that he married three separate women.  Firstly in Cork, Ireland 6 April 1813, then in Bath, England 23 January 1817 and finally in Paris, France where he married another;  1824 imprisoned King’s Bench Prison, Southwark, London on charge of bigamy;  Trial and indicted for bigamy, 14 March 1826 before Mr Baron Graham; On board prison hulk “Leviathan” at Portsmouth, Hampshire; Between 21 March 1827 and 2 August 1827 onboard “Governor Ready” between London and Hobart;  Free Certificate granted 24 September 1833.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Henry Andrews:

Henry ANDREWS was convicted at Oxford, England on 1 March 1834 for stealing a horse and rig. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘John Barry’ arriving 11 Aug 1834.

Single man. Aged 23 yrs.
Place of birth: Romford
Gaol Report: “imprisoned before”.
Hulk Report: “good”

Assigned to service in the Colony of VDL.

11 Nov 1835: Died, in hospital, Launceston, VDL.
18 Nov 1835: Buried.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of John Avery:

John AVERY was convicted at Kent, England on 6 April 1832 for stealing 3 sheep skins. Convicted before. 7yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Moffatt’ arriving 9 May 1834.

Single man.  Stated he had lived by buying and selling rabbit skins and travelling around Kent for the last 20 yrs.Prior to that had been at sea. Had lived as a child by pilfering.

Ship Surgeon’s report: “well behaved”.

VDL:
Clear Conduct Record.

12 June 1834: Died in the H.M. Colonial Hospital, Hobart.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Robert Angus:

Robert ANGUS is recorded as coming to Australia per the ship ‘Arab’. He is not located as a convict, so perhaps crew or free.  He was convicted in Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on 5 May 1831 for sexual assault on a child. 3yr prison sentence.

Single man.

Assigned to Public Works.

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Jonathan Adams:

Jonathan ADAMS was convicted at Suffolk, England on 14 July 1830 for receiving stolen goods. Previously convicted. 14 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘John’ arriving Jan 1831.

Married man. Wife Sarah ADAMS of the Parish How.

VDL:
Died in the Colonial Hospital, Hobart on 26 May 1832. (ref: Convict Conduct record)

Nell Murphy on 25th April, 2017 wrote of Christopher Angier:

Christopher ANGIER was convicted at Middlesex, London on 8 July 1830 for Larceny - stealing a handkerchief from a shop. Previous conviction. 7 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘John’ arriving Jan 1831.

Single man.

Assigned to services.

Died, suddenly, on the street, Hobart 1832.

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