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Recent Submissions

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of James Coates:

FOOTNOTE: James Coates was a collier and miner from Newcastle. He had brown hair and grey eyes (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON23-1-1; image C743-771).

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of James Coates:

1827, 23 August: James Coates was executed by hanging at Hobart Gaol.

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1827, 24 August: The Colonial Times (p4) reported on the men’s executions:

“Yesterday morning, the following nine unfortunate men, being the late gang of runaways, who attempted to take the cutter Emma Kemp, and afterwards took to the bush, committed several robberies, and then fired upon the Military, were executed pursuant to their sentence:- George Braithwaite (one of Lieut. Steele’s Government servants, the other having died of the wounds received while engaged with the Military), James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis (Mr. Bisdee’s servant), George Metcalfe, John Lee, (bricklayer), James Coates, John Brown (mariner) and John Brown (bricklayer.)

All the prisoners from the Barracks, perhaps five or six hundred in number, were paraded under a Military escort to the front of the Gaol, for the purpose of witnessing the awful and exemplary spectacle. One or two of the unhappy culprits addressed the body of prisoners from the scaffold, warning them (especially those in Green’s Chain Gang) not to attempt to abscond into the bush, that being not only a most miserable state of existence, but sure to lead to an untimely end.

William Birmingham, Mr. Dean’s man, Thomas Griffiths, who was wounded in the breast, and John Robertson, Mr. Young’s servant, were reprieved on Friday night last, and had their sentence commuted to transportation for life to Macquarie Harbour.”

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1827, 24 August: James Coates was buried in Hobart Town (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD34-1-1p063j2k).

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of James Coates:

1827, 30 July: James Coates was tried at the Supreme Court, Hobart Town, on a charge of stealing in the dwelling house of Daniel Stanfield property belonging to Stanfield including two coats, one waistcoat, six pairs of trousers, eleven shirts, three hats, two pairs of boots, ten pairs of stockings, one gun and nine bags.

This trial was reported by the Colonial Times, on 3 August 1827, p3:

“Supreme Court.

On Monday this Court re-opened, agreeably to the notice issued by the Chief Justice. The whole of the day was occupied in the trial of the late bushrangers, who attempted to take the Emma Kemp; namely, George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown (mariner), John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson. They were tried for the robbery at Mr. Stanfield’s, and all found —Guilty.”

Note: The charge listed on court documents is “stealing in a dwelling house” (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/SC32-1-1$init=SC32-1-1p259jpg).

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1827, 17 August: The convicted men’s sentencing was reported by the Colonial Times, p3:

“The following prisoners were then placed at the Bar, and sentenced as follows: DEATH. - George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown, (mariner) John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson. The whole of these men, it will be recollected, were the runaways, who, after attempting to seize the Emma Kemp, and failing, took to the bush, and committed several robberies while armed, in which state they were apprehended by the Military. In passing sentence, His Honor held out not the slightest hope of mercy; but strenuously recommended them, one and all, to prepare for another world.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of James Coates:

1826: On arrival in VDL, James Coates, 24, was described as 5’6” tall, with a large scar on the left side of his chin.

1827, 12 March: James Coates – “absent from the Barracks in the Paddock after 9 o’clock last night and being drunk” – was sentenced to 1 month on the chain gang.

1827, 30 June: James Coates was one of eight men who escaped from the prisoners’ barracks at Hobart Town. He is named in this report from Hobart Town Gazette, pp5-6:

“POLICE.

Several depositions have been taken during the week respecting the depredations committed by the prisoners who escaped from the barracks last week. After robbing Mr. Cartwright’s farm at Sandy bay, it appears they crossed to the back of South arm, opposite Betsy Island, and robbed Mr. Barney’s farm of provisions and other articles.

They then proceeded to Mr. Mortimer’s, the gun-smith, from whom they look several stand of arms, some of them fowling-pieces of great value, and also clothes and jewellery. On Sunday, they robbed Mrs. Watson’s house in the same neighbourhood. They had the audacity on Monday to return a second time to Mrs. Watson’s demanding adzes, saws and other carpenters’ tools for the purpose of repairing their boat, very narrowly escaping some of the parties who were in quest of them. On Tuesday morning they were descried by a boy on a small mount surrounded by bushes. They were standing in a circle apparently loading each other with their booty before setting off. As soon as the circumstance was known, the place was searched, and the spot was discovered where they had hauled up their boat, repaired, and subsequently launched her, so that they are again at sea.
Every possible precaution and exertion are taken by the Government to apprehend them, which must inevitably be the case if they do not escape to Bass’s strait. They are young men from about 20 to 25 years of age.
Besides the 8 who have absconded from the barracks, 2 others are missing and supposed to have joined them, viz: Thomas Davis who was known to have made an attempt to escape with Stirling, in the sloop Ellen, some time ago. He has since been employed as a servant in the gaol. The other named William Birmingham is an Irishman, and was in the employ of Mr. Dean of Liverpool-street.
The names of the others are as follows:-

John Brown, 5 feet 3 inches, a mariner, has a scar on the right side of his nose and also on the under lip and on his forehead.

John Brown, 5 feet 6 inches, a bricklayer, is also marked by a scar on the right side of the nose.

James Coates, 5 feet 6 inches, has a large scar on the left side of his chin, arrived by the Chapman last voyage.

Thomas Griffiths, 5 feet 6 inches, a stout made man, a Welshman and a weaver, has a small scar in the centre of his forehead.

James Horsefield, a canal digger, has high temples, and has the forefinger of his right hand enlarged and crippled.

Matthew MacCullum, 5 feet 10 inches, pockpitted, R S on his left arm and W N on his right, a native of Kilmarnock.

George Metcalf, a miller, has a scar between his eyebrows, and a mole on the left side of the neck.

John Robinson, an Irish labourer.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of James Coates:

1825, 3 August: James Coates was convicted at Northumberland’s Summer Assizes for highway robbery and sentenced to death, commuted to transportation for life (see England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England; Northumberland 1825).

1825, 20 October: James Coates, 23, was received aboard the prison hulk Justitia at Woolwich, and was sent from there for transportation on 4 April 1826 (see UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849).

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of George Metcalfe:

1827, 23 August: George Metcalfe was executed by hanging at Hobart Gaol.

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1827, 24 August: The Colonial Times (p4) reported on the men’s executions, as follows:

“Yesterday morning, the following nine unfortunate men, being the late gang of runaways, who attempted to take the cutter Emma Kemp, and afterwards took to the bush, committed several robberies, and then fired upon the Military, were executed pursuant to their sentence :- George Braithwaite (one of Lieut. Steele’s Government servants, the other having died of the wounds received while engaged with the Military), James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis (Mr. Bisdee’s servant), George Metcalfe, John Lee, (bricklayer), James Coates, John Brown (mariner) and John Brown (bricklayer.) All the prisoners from the Barracks, perhaps five or six hundred in number, were paraded under a Military escort to the front of the Gaol, for the purpose of witnessing the awful and exemplary spectacle. One or two of the unhappy culprits addressed the body of prisoners from the scaffold, warning them (especially those in Green’s Chain Gang) not to attempt to abscond into the bush, that being not only a most miserable state of existence, but sure to lead to an untimely end.

William Birmingham, Mr. Dean’s man, Thomas Griffiths, who was wounded in the breast, and John Robertson, Mr. Young’s servant, were reprieved on Friday night last, and had their sentence commuted to transportation for life to Macquarie Harbour.”

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1827, 24 August: George Metcalfe was buried in Hobart Town (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD34-1-1p063j2k).

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of George Metcalfe:

1827, 30 July: George Metcalfe was tried at the Supreme Court, Hobart Town, on a charge of stealing in the dwelling house of Daniel Stanfield property belonging to Stanfield including two coats, one waistcoat, six pairs of trousers, eleven shirts, three hats, two pairs of boots, ten pairs of stockings, one gun and nine bags.

This trial was reported by the Colonial Times, on 3 August 1827, p3:

“Supreme Court.

On Monday this Court re-opened, agreeably to the notice issued by the Chief Justice. The whole of the day was occupied in the trial of the late bushrangers, who attempted to take the Emma Kemp; namely, George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown (mariner), John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson. They were tried for the robbery at Mr. Stanfield’s, and all found —Guilty.”

Note: The charge listed on court documents is “stealing in a dwelling house” (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/SC32-1-1$init=SC32-1-1p259jpg).
1827, 17 August: The convicted men’s sentencing was reported by the Colonial Times, p3:

“The following prisoners were then placed at the Bar, and sentenced as follows: DEATH. - George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown, (mariner) John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson.

The whole of these men, it will be recollected, were the runaways, who, after attempting to seize the Emma Kemp, and failing, took to the bush, and committed several robberies while armed, in which state they were apprehended by the Military. In passing sentence, His Honor held out not the slightest hope of mercy; but strenuously recommended them, one and all, to prepare for another world.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of George Metcalfe:

1827, 11 July: George Metcalfe was among those captured by soldiers and named in this report from the Colonial Times, p2:

“From this [information received], Serjeant Little judged that they must be on a particular neck of land on the coast, and accordingly the next morning, Wednesday, placed his men in ambuscade, so as to intercept them, should they attempt to leave it — first posting a sentinel on a hill to give notice of their approach. About 12 o’clock, the guard descried a party of bushrangers, seven in number, at a distance of about 300 yards; of which he instantly apprised the Serjeant, who finding that he had not been mistaken in his idea of the position of the gang, drew his men from their retreat, and divided them - directing one portion to flank the bushrangers, while he at the head of the others advanced. They shortly came in sight of the banditti; who, immediately they discovered them to be soldiers, fired, but without effect. Notwithstanding this warm reception, the Military, courageous in a good cause, continued to advance with the greatest intrepidity, without returning the compliment, until within 30 yards, when they fired upon the outlaws, and some further shots were exchanged. At this moment, Serjeant Little gave the word to charge.

This had its desired effect, for it is a fact well known that no men will stand at the point of an English bayonet. The gang retreated, with an intent as it was supposed to rally, and repel the charge; but here they were most miserably disappointed; for they were attacked in the rear by the other sub-division, who, hearing the firing, had made rapidly to the spot. Finding themselves thus hemmed in between two parties of Military, and seeing that an attempt to escape must only be paid for by life, they threw down their arms, surrendered, and were made prisoners; and were yesterday morning brought to Hobart Town by Serjeant Little and his party.

Their names are — William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCallam, Thomas Davis, George Metcalf, Thomas Griffiths and John Lee. Griffiths received a ball in his breast, which was extracted yesterday morning, at the Gaol, and he is likely to recover. Lee, who is a bricklayer, is severely wounded in his hand, from the bursting of his piece.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of George Metcalfe:

1825: On arrival in VDL, George Metcalfe was single and a miller. He said he had a previous court appearance on suspicion of burglary, but no conviction. His jail and hulk reports described his behaviour as “very orderly” and “orderly” respectively (see (see http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/ImageViewer/image_viewer.htm?CON31-1-29,366).

1826, 26 December: While in the service of Mr Walker, he left “his master’s premises without leave last night through the window” (see http://search.archives.tas.gov.au/ImageViewer/image_viewer.htm?CON31-1-29,366; image 183).

1827, 30 June: George Metcalfe was one of eight men who escaped from the prisoners’ barracks at Hobart Town. He is named in this report from Hobart Town Gazette, pp5-6:

“POLICE.

Several depositions have been taken during the week respecting the depredations committed by the prisoners who escaped from the barracks last week. After robbing Mr. Cartwright’s farm at Sandy bay, it appears they crossed to the back of South arm, opposite Betsy Island, and robbed Mr. Barney’s farm of provisions and other articles.

They then proceeded to Mr. Mortimer’s, the gun-smith, from whom they look several stand of arms, some of them fowling-pieces of great value, and also clothes and jewellery. On Sunday, they robbed Mrs. Watson’s house in the same neighbourhood. They had the audacity on Monday to return a second time to Mrs. Watson’s demanding adzes, saws and other carpenters’ tools for the purpose of repairing their boat, very narrowly escaping some of the parties who were in quest of them. On Tuesday morning they were descried by a boy on a small mount surrounded by bushes. They were standing in a circle apparently loading each other with their booty before setting off. As soon as the circumstance was known, the place was searched, and the spot was discovered where they had hauled up their boat, repaired, and subsequently launched her, so that they are again at sea. Every possible precaution and exertion are taken by the Government to apprehend them, which must inevitably be the case if they do not escape to Bass’s strait. They are young men from about 20 to 25 years of age.
Besides the 8 who have absconded from the barracks, 2 others are missing and supposed to have joined them, viz: Thomas Davis who was known to have made an attempt to escape with Stirling, in the sloop Ellen, some time ago. He has since been employed as a servant in the gaol. The other named William Birmingham is an Irishman, and was in the employ of Mr. Dean of Liverpool-street.
The names of the others are as follows:-

John Brown, 5 feet 3 inches, a mariner, has a scar on the right side of his nose and also on the under lip and on his forehead.

John Brown, 5 feet 6 inches, a bricklayer, is also marked by a scar on the right side of the nose.

James Coates, 5 feet 6 inches, has a large scar on the left side of his chin, arrived by the Chapman last voyage.

Thomas Griffiths, 5 feet 6 inches, a stout made man, a Welshman and a weaver, has a small scar in the centre of his forehead.

James Horsefield, a canal digger, has high temples, and has the forefinger of his right hand enlarged and crippled.

Matthew MacCullum, 5 feet 10 inches, pockpitted, R S on his left arm and W N on his right, a native of Kilmarnock.

George Metcalf, a miller, has a scar between his eyebrows, and a mole on the left side of the neck.

John Robinson, an Irish labourer.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of George Metcalfe:

1825, 1 March: George Metcalfe, 20, was convicted at the Durham Lent Assizes for burglary and sentenced to death, commuted to transportation for life (see England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892).

1825, 8 April: He was received aboard the prison hulk Justitia at Woolwich, and sent from there for transportation on 16 July (see UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849).

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1827, 23 August: Thomas Davies was executed by hanging at Hobart Gaol.

1827, 24 August: The Colonial Times (p4) reported on the men’s executions:

“Yesterday morning, the following nine unfortunate men, being the late gang of runaways, who attempted to take the cutter Emma Kemp, and afterwards took to the bush, committed several robberies, and then fired upon the Military, were executed pursuant to their sentence :- George Braithwaite (one of Lieut. Steele’s Government servants, the other having died of the wounds received while engaged with the Military), James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis (Mr. Bisdee’s servant), George Metcalfe, John Lee, (bricklayer), James Coates, John Brown (mariner) and John Brown (bricklayer.) All the prisoners from the Barracks, perhaps five or six hundred in number, were paraded under a Military escort to the front of the Gaol, for the purpose of witnessing the awful and exemplary spectacle. One or two of the unhappy culprits addressed the body of prisoners from the scaffold, warning them (especially those in Green’s Chain Gang) not to attempt to abscond into the bush, that being not only a most miserable state of existence, but sure to lead to an untimely end.

William Birmingham, Mr. Dean’s man, Thomas Griffiths, who was wounded in the breast, and John Robertson, Mr. Young’s servant, were reprieved on Friday night last, and had their sentence commuted to transportation for life to Macquarie Harbour.”

1827, 24 August: Thomas Davies (called Davis) was buried in Hobart Town (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/RGD34-1-1p063j2k).

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1827, 30 July: Thomas Davies was tried at the Supreme Court, Hobart Town, on a charge of stealing in the dwelling house of Daniel Stanfield property belonging to Stanfield including two coats, one waistcoat, six pairs of trousers, eleven shirts, three hats, two pairs of boots, ten pairs of stockings, one gun and nine bags.

This trial was reported by the Colonial Times, on 3 August 1827, p3:

“Supreme Court.

On Monday this Court re-opened, agreeably to the notice issued by the Chief Justice. The whole of the day was occupied in the trial of the late bushrangers, who attempted to take the Emma Kemp; namely, George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown (mariner), John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson. They were tried for the robbery at Mr. Stanfield’s, and all found —Guilty.”

Note: The charge listed on court documents is “stealing in a dwelling house” (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/SC32-1-1$init=SC32-1-1p259jpg).

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1827, 17 August: The convicted men’s sentencing was reported by the Colonial Times, p3:

“The following prisoners were then placed at the Bar, and sentenced as follows: DEATH. - George Braithwaite, William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCullum, Thomas Davis, Thomas Griffiths, George Metcalfe, John Lee, James Coates, John Brown, (mariner) John Brown (bricklayer), and John Robinson. The whole of these men, it will be recollected, were the runaways, who, after attempting to seize the Emma Kemp, and failing, took to the bush, and committed several robberies while armed, in which state they were apprehended by the Military. In passing sentence, His Honor held out not the slightest hope of mercy; but strenuously recommended them, one and all, to prepare for another world.”

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1827, 11 July: Thomas Davies was among those captured by soldiers and named in this report from the Colonial Times, p2:

“From this [information received], Serjeant Little judged that they must be on a particular neck of land on the coast, and accordingly the next morning, Wednesday, placed his men in ambuscade, so as to intercept them, should they attempt to leave it — first posting a sentinel on a hill to give notice of their approach. About 12 o’clock, the guard descried a party of bushrangers, seven in number, at a distance of about 300 yards; of which he instantly apprised the Serjeant, who finding that he had not been mistaken in his idea of the position of the gang, drew his men from their retreat, and divided them - directing one portion to flank the bushrangers, while he at the head of the others advanced. They shortly came in sight of the banditti; who, immediately they discovered them to be soldiers, fired, but without effect. Notwithstanding this warm reception, the Military, courageous in a good cause, continued to advance with the greatest intrepidity, without returning the compliment, until within 30 yards, when they fired upon the outlaws, and some further shots were exchanged. At this moment, Serjeant Little gave the word to charge.

This had its desired effect, for it is a fact well known that no men will stand at the point of an English bayonet. The gang retreated, with an intent as it was supposed to rally, and repel the charge; but here they were most miserably disappointed; for they were attacked in the rear by the other sub-division, who, hearing the firing, had made rapidly to the spot. Finding themselves thus hemmed in between two parties of Military, and seeing that an attempt to escape must only be paid for by life, they threw down their arms, surrendered, and were made prisoners; and were yesterday morning brought to Hobart Town by Serjeant Little and his party.

Their names are — William Birmingham, James Horsefield, Matthew McCallam, Thomas Davis, George Metcalf, Thomas Griffiths and John Lee. Griffiths received a ball in his breast, which was extracted yesterday morning, at the Gaol, and he is likely to recover. Lee, who is a bricklayer, is severely wounded in his hand, from the bursting of his piece.”

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1827, 30 June: Thomas Davies was one of 10 men who absconded from Hobart Town. He is named (as Thomas Davis) in this report from Hobart Town Gazette, pp5-6:

“POLICE.

Several depositions have been taken during the week respecting the depredations committed by the prisoners who escaped from the barracks last week. After robbing Mr. Cartwright’s farm at Sandy bay, it appears they crossed to the back of South arm, opposite Betsy Island, and robbed Mr. Barney’s farm of provisions and other articles.

They then proceeded to Mr. Mortimer’s, the gun-smith, from whom they look several stand of arms, some of them fowling-pieces of great value, and also clothes and jewellery. On Sunday, they robbed Mrs. Watson’s house in the same neighbourhood. They had the audacity on Monday to return a second time to Mrs. Watson’s demanding adzes, saws and other carpenters’ tools for the purpose of repairing their boat, very narrowly escaping some of the parties who were in quest of them. On Tuesday morning they were descried by a boy on a small mount surrounded by bushes. They were standing in a circle apparently loading each other with their booty before setting off. As soon as the circumstance was known, the place was searched, and the spot was discovered where they had hauled up their boat, repaired, and subsequently launched her, so that they are again at sea.

Every possible precaution and exertion are taken by the Government to apprehend them, which must inevitably be the case if they do not escape to Bass’s strait. They are young men from about 20 to 25 years of age.

Besides the 8 who have absconded from the barracks, 2 others are missing and supposed to have joined them, viz: Thomas Davis who was known to have made an [unsuccessful] attempt to escape with [Alexander] Stirling, in the sloop Ellen, some time ago [in January]. He has since been employed as a servant in the gaol. The other named William Birmingham is an Irishman, and was in the employ of Mr. Dean of Liverpool-street.
The names of the others are as follows:-

John Brown, 5 feet 3 inches, a mariner, has a scar on the right side of his nose and also on the under lip and on his forehead.

John Brown, 5 feet 6 inches, a bricklayer, is also marked by a scar on the right side of the nose.

James Coates, 5 feet 6 inches, has a large scar on the left side of his chin, arrived by the Chapman last voyage.

Thomas Griffiths, 5 feet 6 inches, a stout made man, a Welshman and a weaver, has a small scar in the centre of his forehead.

James Horsefield, a canal digger, has high temples, and has the forefinger of his right hand enlarged and crippled.

Matthew MacCullum, 5 feet 10 inches, pockpitted, R S on his left arm and W N on his right, a native of Kilmarnock.

George Metcalf, a miller, has a scar between his eyebrows, and a mole on the left side of the neck.

John Robinson, an Irish labourer.”

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1826, 12 August: A Thomas Davis is one of the assigned servants named in this report from the Hobart Town Gazette, p2. Is he “our” Thomas Davies?

“HEROIC ACHIEVEMENTS

Our Readers, will recollect the six ruffians who escaped from Maria Island, and were advertised in our Journal on the 10th of June last. Soon after, we had the pleasure to record the brave conduct of Mr. Gatenby, and the death of one of the most desperate of them named McGillivray. Adams, another, surrendered himself to his former employer Mr. Burcher, at the Coal River. The remaining four, Brown, Birt, Ellis and Howe committed a robbery, being strongly armed, at Mr. James Robertson’s hut the South Esk, on Sunday the 30th ultimo.

About 2 o’clock of the same day, Mr. W N. Gray rode up and was also secured by the villains, who stripped him of his watch, and Howe mounted his horse. These two gentlemen, with four prisoners, assigned servants, William Farrell, Thomas Davis, Philip Davies, and John Haines, were marched with their hands tied, while the ruffians guarded them with loaded guns, pistols, and drawn knives. Farrell’s hands however were left at liberty, he having a sore leg. Howe had crossed the river on horseback to fetch the ferry boat. With Philip Davies and John Haines walking behind by the side of Ellis and Birt, Mr. Gray looked round to shew them he was ready, and they immediately seized Birt and Ellis; and Mr. Gray with his right arm, which was untied, clasped Brown so close that he could not move either of his arms. Farrell instantly seized Brown, and Mr. Gray disengaged his other arm, which was tied to T. Davis, and Mr. Robertson also released himself, and wrested the guns from Brown.

Several shots were fired at Howe, who was in the boat on the river at the time, but he escaped in the dusk. On the following Tuesday, Howe made his appearance at the hut of Mr. John
Earl on the same river, and was fortunately secured, after first falling on his knees, and afterwards making some dastardly attempt to stab with a large knife.

When he surrendered himself, he wished he had been shot dead, as he was sure, he said, to be hanged. He received one gunshot wound in the arm, and besides a pistol, which he had left in the boat, he had with him a double-barrelled gun, a large knife, a bag of bullets, two of gunpowder, and one of buck shot.”

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1825, December: On arrival in VDL, Thomas Davies was single. He said he had been convicted for street robbery. He had no previous convictions (see https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON31-1-9$init=CON31-1-9p137).

1826, 6 June: While assigned to Mr McArthur, he was charged with aiding and abetting Samuel Higgins to rob Higgins’s master [Captain Wilson] on 5 February 1826. Thomas Davies was sentenced “to be transported to such place as the Governor may direct for 3 years”.

1826, 10 June: From the Hobart Town Gazette, p2: “On Thursday, before a Court of General Sessions, Samuel Higgins, Thomas Davis, and Alexander Sterling, were sentenced to transportation for three years, for the robbery at Captain Wilson’s, in February last.”

Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1824, 6 December: Thomas Davies successfully petitioned against the death sentence. It was commuted to transportation for life. Below is the summary record from the National Archives (see https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C14461895):

“Reference: HO 17/7/44 …Prisoner name(s): Thomas Davies, alias Roberts, alias Eccles.
Court and date of trial: Glasgow Assizes, 1824.
Crime: Street robbery of Robert Murphy, Bookseller.
Initial sentence: Death.

Gaoler’s report: None, but the petitioner Reverend William Routledge says he has been informed that the prisoner conducted himself well while in jail.

Annotated (Outcome): Sentence commuted to transportation for life. Request from Reverend W. Routledge dated 2nd April 1825 that the prisoner be released annotated ‘Refused’.

A letter from the Lord Justice Clerk, D. Boyle, dated 7th November 1823, bears the annotation: ‘Pardon prepared November 1824’.

Petitioner(s): Thomas Davies, the prisoner.

Rev. William Routledge, Minister of the Episcopal Chapel, Glasgow and prison visitor. Patrick McFarlan, Minister of St. John’s, Glasgow and spiritual advisor to persons under sentence of death.
John Kerr, Solicitor in Glasgow.

Grounds for clemency (Petition Details): The prisoner, a man previously unknown to any prosecuting authorities, was innocent of the robbery charge on which he was convicted. The prisoner, an Englishman, had arrived in Glasgow on the day the offence occurred en route to Greenock in search of a berth on board a vessel, having previous experience at sea. At the trial he was convicted as a consequence of perjured evidence by a prostitute well known to the police who, in seeking to protect the men who had actually carried out the robbery, gave sworn evidence that this prisoner had taken a catalogue stolen from the victim. The policeman who had searched this prisoner subsequently made a statement that no such catalogue was found on him when he was searched immediately following his arrest, nor was any of the other property taken from the victim.
Members of the Jury have made statements on behalf of this prisoner subsequent to his trial and conviction.

Other papers: Printed indictment.

Declarations by various persons involved in the case.

Notes of evidence and comments on the case by the trial Judge.

Date: 1824 Nov 3 - 1825 Apr 2.”

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Dianne Jones on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Thomas Davies:

1824: Precognition … against Daniel McNicoll, Thomas Cumming, William Caldwell, Thomas Davies, William Taylor for the crime of robbery.

Accused: Daniel McNicoll, alias McColl, Age: 16, cloth lapper, Address: Gorbals, Glasgow; Thomas Cumming, Address: Glasgow; William Caldwell, Age: 21, baker, Address: Trongate, Glasgow; Thomas Davies, alias Roberts; alias Eccles; alias Uckles, Age: 25, tailor and deserter from 92nd Regiment, Origin: Native of Monmouthshire; and William Taylor, Age: 16, weaver, Address: Bridgeton, Glasgow.

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1824:  Trial… Trial papers relating to William Caldwell, William Taylor, Thomas Davies, Thomas Cumming for the crime of robbery. Tried at High Court, Glasgow.

Dates: 29 Sep 1824

Accused: William Caldwell [not stated].

William Taylor, Verdict: Guilty, Sentence: Transportation - Life. Note: No indictment.

Thomas Davies, alias Roberts, alias Eccles, alias Uckles, Verdict: Guilty, Sentence: Death - hanging by public executioner, Petition: Remission of sentence, 6 December 1824, (see JC4/15, f.125v) entry in Book of Adjournal was not completed, so outcome is unclear.

Thomas Cumming, Verdict: Not proven, Sentence: Assoilzied and dismissed (see http://catalogue.nrscotland.gov.uk/, JC26/1824/126).
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D Wong on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Joseph Bartholomew:

Morning Post London, England
4 Aug 1818
ASSIZE INTELLIGENCE
Joseph Bartholomew, aged 28, and John Bartholomew, aged 26, for stealing two horses, the property of Edward Shepherd.

Joseph Bartholomew was listed as 30 years old on arrival in NSW.

Brother, John Bartholomew was left behind in VDL being ill, he died on 15/6/1819.

Joseph was a labourer/gardener, 5’7” tall, dark sallow complexion, black hair, dark eyes.

Native Place: Berkshire.

17/7/1823: (newspaper date) TOL Airds.

8/9/1825: COF

D Wong on 16th May, 2021 wrote of John Bartholomew:

Newgate Calendar of Prisoners:
John Bartholomew, 26, 5’5½” born at Reading, labourer, committed by R. Birnie, Esq. for stealing in the County of Kent two horses price £10, of Edward Shepherd.

D Wong on 16th May, 2021 wrote of John Bartholomew:

Morning Post London, England
4 Aug 1818
ASSIZE INTELLIGENCE
Joseph Bartholomew, aged 28, and John Bartholomew, aged 26, for stealing two horses, the property of Edward Shepherd.

Brother, Joseph, disembarked NSW.

Penny-Lyn Beale on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Henry Payne:

1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy)
No; 101738
Name; Henry Payne
Age; 20
Ship; England [1826]
Sentence; 7 years
Religion; Protestant
Assigned; No; 14 Road Gang. Kissing Point
Noted; Against name; DEAD: 1830

Australia, Death Index,
Name: Henry Payne
Date: 1830 - New South Wales
Volume Number: V1830306 14

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, Death Register,
Name: Henry Payne. Ship; England.
Date: 1830
Volume Number: 4/4549

Penny-Lyn Beale on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Henry Payne:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents. England - 18 Sept 1826
Indent No; 55
Age; 19 [1805]
Native Place; London. reads and writes, single. Protestant.
Trade or calling; Errand Boy
Offence; Stealing Linen
Trial; London - 3 Jun 1824. 7 years
Height; 5 ft. 5 1/2 in
Eyes; Grey
Hair; Dk Brown
Completion; Ruddy freckled

Penny-Lyn Beale on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Charles Paine:

1823 - New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents. Henry - 26 Aug 1823
Name; Charles Paine Age; 48 [1774]
Trade or calling; Baker &
Trial; Warwick - 30 Mar 1822
Height; 5 ft. 5 in
Eyes; Grey
Hair; Fair
Completion; Sallow

1824 - 14 Sep. Drunk and challenging his master to fight. Sentence; Tread Mill for 2 days

1825 - General Muster. Convict. Assigned; G. S. - S L Dickens, Windsor

1828 New South Wales, Australia Census (TNA Copy)
No; 10175
Name; Charles Payne [Paine]
Age; 55
Ship; Henry - 1823
Sentence; 7 years
Religion; Protestant
Assigned; Alex. McLeod

Penny-Lyn Beale on 16th May, 2021 wrote of Charles Paine:

1833 - New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, Convicts Deaths
Name: Chas Paine. Ship; Henry. Age; 60.
District; Newcastle - George Brooks
Date: 6 Oct 1833
Volume Number: 4/4549

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