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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 5,000 10,000 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 7,256 new convicts added in total!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 28,856 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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Goal: 1,000 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 50,000 contributions. We currently have 32,559 contributions.

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Recent Submissions

Wendy Smith on 20th May, 2019 wrote of Charles Dempsey:

A native of Dublin and tried on 10 June 1835.  Convicted for stealing clothes.  He had previous being convicted for another crime and served six months in Ireland.  On arrival in Sydney he was single, Religion Roman Catholic and could not read or write: Height 5 ft and 4 1/2 inches; Complexion Ruddy; Hair Brown and Eyes Grey.  Assigned to Mr James Wright at Lanyon in the late 1830’s.  Lanyon is located now in southern Canberra, ACT.

Wendy Smith on 20th May, 2019 wrote of James Molloy:

Died in General Hospital, Sydney on 10 November 1835.  Prisoner Number 35/2459 and transport number 78.  No other information recorded.

Wendy Smith on 20th May, 2019 wrote of Patrick Brady:

Transport number 62.  No Prisoner number.  Only other information was that he died at sea.

Wendy Smith on 20th May, 2019 wrote of Thomas Feehan:

Died at sea from Nervous fever.  No Prisoner number.  Transport number 204.  No other information provided.

Wendy Smith on 20th May, 2019 wrote of Patrick Monks:

The only information recorded for Patrick Monks that he died in the General Hospital, Sydney on 30 October 1835.  Prisoner Number 35/2653.

D Wong on 19th May, 2019 wrote of William Record:

William Record and Wm. Jones, for stealing from the person of Thomas Watkins.

William Jones was also onboard.

William Record was 21 years old on arrival in VDL.
Place of Birth: Birmingham.

William was 5’5” tall, dark brown hair, brown eyes, scar on centre of forehead, scar right side of chin underneath, one small scar on both thumbs, small scar outside left arm, small scar on right cheek, single.

Mother and brother at birmingham, Sarah Record keeps a School in ### street.
I worked last for Johnson next door to my mother.

1830-32 Musters: Public Works.
1833 Muster: TOL

9/1/1837: Permission to marry Ann Newboll (New Grove 1835).

19/2/1837: Married at St. David’s Hobart.

14/7/1840: CP
23/8/1843: Free Pardon

19/4/1845 The Courier, Hobart:
Sailed on the schooner ‘Mercury’, Mr. William Record, Mrs. Ann Record, for Adelaide.

14/6/1845 Adelaide Observer, SA:
At the Quarterly meeting of the Bench of Magistrates, on Monday last, the following transfers of licences took place, namely,
The “Robert Burns,” Hindley-street, to William Record.

1849: Was a butcher at Gawler, SA.
13/6/1849: Granted a slaughtering licence at Gawler.

1854: Ann Record died in South Australia.

26/9/1855 Bendigo Advertiser, Vic:
SANDHURST COURT OF PETTY SESSIONS.
ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF A HORSE.
William Record was summoned by John Pigott for refusing to give up to him a horse he claimed as his. It appeared that the prosecutor had lost a mare, the brands of which, and certain natural marks, especially a wen under the belly, enabled him to swear to. The defendant produced a pound receipt, which however did not correspond with the brands on the mare.
The Bench ordered the mare to be given lip to the prosecutor.

1856: William Record died - father listed as Anthony, mother - Sarah.
VIC BDM.

D Wong on 19th May, 2019 wrote of William Willmore:

5/9/1827 Leicester Herald Leicestershire, England:
WARWICK ASSIZZES

William Wilmore, for highway robbery.

William Willmore was listed as 19 years old on arrival - he was born in Birmingham.

William was 5’6” tall, light brown hair, grey eyes, small scar over left eyebrow scar flesh moles left side of neck, scar on the right arm near the bend of elbow.

Father: Henry Willmore at native place, a fire iron maker, works for Mr Baynton at Birmingham.  I work when taken for Rd. Cotterell - I was not out of employ, I was with my mother.  Single.

Occupation: Labourer/plater.

1830 Muster: Assigned to T. A. Lascelles Esq.

8/10/1834: Permission to marry Mary Hone (free) - denied.

1833-35 Muster: Assigned to Mr. W. Mansfield.

8/8/1836: Permission to marry Mary Ann Chamberlain (New Grove) - permission not given.

27/1/1840: CP

Rowena Anne Curtin on 19th May, 2019 wrote of John Paton:

Marriage: On 22nd June, 1832 John Paton and Mary Frances Jones were married by Rev John Dunmore Lang at Scots Prebyterian Church, Sydney. John was 37 years old and Mary was 19. The witnesses were Cornelius Sheehan and Sarah Chamberlain. They had been granted permission to marry on the 14th March, 1832 by Rev Dr John Dunmore Lang.

Wendy Simes on 19th May, 2019 wrote of Robert Garrard:

Married 1 Elizabeth Mayes 9/2/1807 at Gislingham, Suffolk.  Two children John 1807, Maria 1808. Married 2 Sarah Taylor 1826 at Liverpool, Sydney. Ten children.  Farmer Milton, NSW.

Elizabeth Jack on 19th May, 2019 wrote of David Poultney:

Poultney’s crime involved a poaching incident committed on 20 Dec 1828 at the Earl of Denbigh’s residence, Newnham Paddox, near Coventry. A group of 28 poachers set out from Foleshill (just adjacent to Bell Green, and a short distance outside Coventry). They encountered the gamekeeper and his men at the Earl of Denbigh’s residence, where one of the poachers shot and wounded the gamekeeper, John Slinn, who was left for dead. Seventeen of the poachers were found guilty of “shooting with intent to kill” and with aiding and abetting. Two turned crown witness (See article from Warwick Advertiser, 1829).
His original sentence of death was commuted to 14 years.

Iris Dunne on 19th May, 2019 wrote of George Preddy:

Convict Indents: aged 19, Convicted 25 March 1826, can read & write, single, Trade: Tallow chandler (candlemaker), How disposed of & Remarks: Mineral Surveyor, C 33/322

No. 1793 on Prison Hulk ship Ganymede, moored at Chatham, aged 17, Received 22 April 1826, Named Geo Preddy, Tried 25 March 1826 in Taunton for Housebreaking, Transferred 2 June 1829 for NSW

Certificate of Freedom No.33/322 dated 15 April 1833
https://www.records.nsw.gov.au/searchhits_nocopy?id=65&Surname=Preddy&Firstname=George&Alias=&Vessel=&Year=&RecordType=&Citation=&Remarks=

D Wong on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Joseph Billing:

15/3/1823 Windsor and Eton Express Berkshire, England:
BEDFORDSHIRE LENT ASSIZES.
Joseph Billing, for stealing a bay horse, the property of the Rev. J. Gould, at Newton-Blossomville.

Native Place: Beddingham.

Joseph was 5’1½” tall, brown hair, hazel eyes, pugilists P&C right arm, J&AB C&CB 1822 left arm, scar across right arm just above wrist joint.

Listed as 19 years old on arrival - but also listed as married with 2 children.
Wife, Ann at Newton Bedfordshire.

Father and mother at Biddenham, Bedfordshire.

1830 Muster: Assigned to J. Archer Esq.
1832 Muster: Assigned to Joseph Archer Esq.
1835 Muster: TOL

30/11/1839: CP No. 2232
7/1/1840: CP approved.

14/2/1865: There is a death listed for a Joseph Billings, aged 84** - died at Brickfields Depot - death registered at Hobart—-given that the above Joseph was married with 2 children at 19 years old, perhaps they got his age and birth date wrong???

D Wong on 18th May, 2019 wrote of William Hester:

William Hester was 33 years old on arrival.

Father and Mother, 1 brother and 2 sisters at Native Place, Wooburn Green Bucks.

Conduct Record: Drunk mostly.

Had TOL by 7/8/1832.

1830 Muster: Public Works
1832 Muster: Assigned to Mr. A Reid
1833 Muster: PW
1835 Muster: TOL

D Wong on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Mustell Chapman:

Mustell Chapman was listed as 42 years old on arrival in VDL.

Place of Birth: Barrington.

Stated this offence: Housebreaking, Mrs Norris at Willingham, once before for Housebreaking at Hertford - 5 years ago, sentence life, broke out of Gaol and remained absent 4 years.

Mustell was 5’4” tall, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, mole inside right arm.
Single - 5 children at Buntingford, Hertfordshire on the Parish.

Father: John

Worked last in Lincolnshire, near Boston for ### Pepper.

1830 Muster: Public Works
1832-35 Musters: Assigned to Mr. J. G. Parker.

20/2/1830 Hobart Town Courier, Tas:
Mustel Chapman was also sentenced to 7 years’ banishment for robbing his master Mr. Francis Barnes, at his farm at Muddy Plains of a quantity of rod iron.

June 1838: CP
24/5/1842: Free Pardon.

No records found after 1843.

D Wong on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Hugh Tunney:

Hugh Tunny was 26 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Mayo.

Hugh was 5’4½” tall, dark ruddy complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes.

1819: TOL
4/1/1827: COF

30/5/1833 Sydney Gazette:
NOTICE.

HENRY SMITH gives notice to
HUGH TUNNY, who rented a Piece of Land from him of 8 Acres, that unless the said Tunny comes forward before the 5th of June and pays his rent, the Wheat,and all other Articles in Henry Smith’s possession belonging to him, will be sold.
Near Campbell Town,
25th May, 1833.

27/3/1837: Permission to marry Ellen Maher (Roslin Castle 1836)Hugh was aged 44 and free - Ellen was 25 and on bond.

14/5/1837: Married Ellen Maher at St. John the Evagelist Church, Campbelltown.
No children listed on NSW BDM - following were listed on Ancestry websites:
1837: Mary Ann Tunney
1840-1906: Catherine Tunney
1843-1895: Bridget Tunney.

22/9/1857: Hugh Tunney died at Tumut, NSW, of old age and decay of nature.
Buried on the 24/9/1857 at the Catholic Burial Ground, Tumut, NSW.

15/9/1886: Ellen died of TB, at Gladesville, NSW.

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Mustell Chapman:

Master CHAPMAN aged 40, convict, Catarrh.
Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Snowden Dunhill:

Snowdon DANHILL aged 59, convict, Catarrh accompanied with Pleuritic Stitch.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Samuel Hopkins:

Samuel HOPKINS aged 17, Convict, 22nd December at Sea, was assisting the Butcher in killing a sheep. The deck being very slippery when the Vessel gave a sudden roll and in endeavouring to save himself from falling accidentally received an incised wound across the Metacarpal Bones of the left hand from the Butcher’s knife. The Exterior Tendons of the Ring and little fingers were completely divided and the other Exteriors were exposed to view- The lips of the wound were immediately brought together by strips of adhesive plaster and a soft Pledget and Bandage. On the 29th the dressings were removed and adhesion had taken place the whole line of the wound except on the little finger. It was now daily dressed till the 7th of January when it was completely cicatrized and on the 9th he was discharged from the Sick List, cured.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of William Hester:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
William Hester, convict, aged 33, Scorbutic Dysentry, also subject to Epileptic fits and general debility.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of James Winfield:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
James Wifield, convict, aged 21, Scorbutic dysentry.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Joseph Billing:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
Joseph Billins, convict, aged 26, Scorbutic dysentry.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of William Parker:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
William Parker, convict, aged 54, Scurvy.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of William Jones:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
William Jones, convict, aged 24, Scurvy.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Thomas Adams:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
Thomas Adams, convict, aged 22, Scurvy.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

Maureen Withey on 18th May, 2019 wrote of Thomas Sillwood:

From 36 degrees of South Latitude to the Cape we experienced boisterous weather which left the Prison room damp in spite of our unremitted attention to have it thoroughly ventilated and kept as dry as possible by lighting fires in the Airing and Swing stoves between decks-Notwithstanding our attention thirteen cases of Scurvy now manifested themselves which became daily more unequivocal. I may be allowed to remark that the experience of past voyages (this being the fourth) convince me that Prisoners received on board at Woolwich are generally in more precarious state of health and consequently more prone to manifest symptoms of Scurvy, Fluxes and Fevers than those received on board at the out ports and Ireland- having gone three former Voyages without loosing one and not even sent to the Hospital on my arrival at Sydney. In consequence of the Scorbutic cases and our proximity to the Cape of Good Hope I recommended the Master to put in being well convinced that nothing but a mixed diet of wholesome animal and vegetables would be efficient to remove the Scorbutic diathesis now but too general on board. We reached the Cape on the 21st November 1823 and stood till the 30th when the obstinate cases of Scurvy and Scorbutic Dysentry were rapidly receding and general health improving-Three days fresh Beef and Vegetables were carried to sea for Guard and convicts so that they were thirteen days on fresh provisions during this period. The Beef was indifferent, the Vegetables consisted of Carrots, Turnips, Leeks and greens…the cases were as follows, viz.
Thomas Silwood, convict, aged 20, Scurvy.

Journal of Surgeon William Evans, Medical and Surgical Journal of the Asia Convict Ship, between the 28th. June 1823 and the 18th. January 1824 during which time the said Vessel has been employed in conveying one hundred and fifty male convicts from Woolwich to Hobart Town, Van Diemen’s Land, N. S. Wales

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