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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Denis Pember on 28th April, 2017 wrote of Philip Roberts:

Philip Roberts was tried at the old Bailey:
PHILIP ROBERTS
Old Bailey Trial: 8th December 1790 (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org)
Reference Number: t17901208-35
Offence: Violent Theft > highway robbery
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Death

The trial transcript is very very large, well over 15 pages!  Well worth a read…
Briefly, GEORGE PLATT and PHILIP ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously assaulting enry Sharpe , on the 2d of November last, on the King’s highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, one guinea, and ten shillings and sixpence, in monies numbered, his monies…..

After numerous witness statements and a very long trial… the decision was GEORGE PLATT , PHILIP ROBERTS ,
GUILTY , Death .
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.
One of the witnesses for the accused was also found guilty of perjury in the matter.

D Wong on 28th April, 2017 wrote of James Cotton:

James Caton per ‘Camden’ was assigned to William Cromarty on release from Newcastle gaol on 28/11/1836 - Port Stephens. He seems to be the convict who drowned along with William Cromarty and his son, also William. William Cromarty was Harbour Master and pilot at Newcastle.
NSW BDM: Deaths: CATTON JAMES 3419/1838 V18383419

Old Bailey:
JAMES COTTON, Theft > pocketpicking, 10th September 1823.
Offence: Theft > pocketpicking
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Transportation

JAMES COTTON was indicted for stealing, on the 3d of July, a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Edward Brown, from his person.

Prisoner’s Defence. I happened to be passing the corner of Bleeding Heart-yard, when a gentleman said he wanted me, and detained me till the prosecutor came up - and at the office he said he could not swear to my picking his pocket.
GUILTY. Aged 18.
Transported for Life.

1823/24/25 Musters of NSW: Assigned to E. G. Cory, Newcastle.

23/11/1824: Newcastle, Convict servant of A. B. Sparke.  To be victualled from the Stores at Newcastle for 6 months.

22/2/1826: Aged 20, Absconded from the service of E. Cory. James was then described as: 20 years old, 5’2 1/2” tall, dark hazel eyes, brown hair, pale complexion.  From Edw. Cory, Hunter’s River.  Still with E. G. Cory at Patersons Plains in Nov. 1828.

7/12/1830: Port Stephens - Indoor servant - Assigned to the A.A. Company and arrived on the cutter ‘Lambton’ 4th December.

1836: TOL for Port Stephens, altered to Port Macquarie February 1837 then altered to Maitland.

1842: Working for John Eales at Liverpool Plains.
4/3/1842: TOL Passport on recommendation of the Maitland Bench.

Oct. 1843: TOL altered to Moreton Bay.
30/7/1847: COF

No marriage or death listed on the NSW BDM or the QLD BDM.

Nell Murphy on 28th April, 2017 wrote of Catherine Stack:

Catherine STACK was convicted at Tipperary, Ireland on 27 June 1851 for stealing a cow. Previous offences. 7yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Martin Luther’ arriving 1 Sept 1852.

Aged 20yrs; single woman; child’s maid; can read; Roman Catholic; fresh complexion; black hair; blue eyes; 4’9 3/4”.
Native place of Birth: Tipperary.
Stated she had no relations to list on her personal Indent of information.
Assigned to work services in the Hobart district.

25 April 1853: Application for permission to marry - to John ROBERTS (recorded as a free person which may be free or free by servitude) (ref. 52/1/6)

1 Aug 1853: Married John ROBERTS. (ref. noted on her Conduct record & reg. 37/1/12 766)at Hobart, Church of St. Joseph. Catherine 24yrs, servant. John aged 40yrs, a miner.

15 Aug 1854: Ticket of Leave granted.

14 Aug 1855: Conditional Pardon approved.

Nell Murphy on 28th April, 2017 wrote of Edward Abbott:

Edward ABBOTT was convicted at Liverpool, Lancaster, England on 5 Jan 1831 for stealing money. Previous conviction and bad connections. 14 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Larkins’ arriving 19 Oct 1831.

Single man; labourer; aged 31yrs; 5’5 3/4”.
Native place of birth: Blackburn, Lancaster, England.

Assigned to work service.
Had obtained his Ticket of Leave by 1837.
April 1837: charged with stealing. 12mths Probation and deprived of Ticket of Leave.
Original term of transportation extended by 3 yrs.
Further records of misconduct and punishments.
5 Jan 1848: Free Certificate issued.

Further charges in 1849 & 1851 at Hobart.
1849: Sent to Tunbridge and then Port Arthur Penal settlement. 15 Aug 1850 Free.

19 Sept 1866: Died, at the general hospital Hobart. Cause - pneumonia. Born Lancashire. Age given as 69yrs.

Leslie Kilmartin on 28th April, 2017 wrote of James Cotton:

Could this be the James Cotton who drowned at Port Stephens, NSW, in September 1838?  He was a labourer assigned to William Cromarty, free settler of Pt Stephens.  Both drowned off One Mile Beach attempting to recover a life boat.

Iris Dunne on 28th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Morton:

Convicted 23 February 1785
Ship Lady Penrhyn
Crime: Felony on HO 10/7 or Stealing 17 Handkerchiefs, value 23 shillings (or 18 shillings) on the 15th January, about 4 or 5 in the afternoon, property of Joseph Capps
aged 25 on arrival on one document or 20 on departure
Possibly gave birth to child 16 November 1789 (d.14 February 1790) whose father was a seaman

ADELE WHITMORE on 28th April, 2017 wrote of Peter Kelly:

Died at the age of 85 years at Caragabal NSW
Buried: Caragabal, Morris Payne’s Property, Weddin Shire NSW-Private Burial.
[Western Champion Newspaper (Parks) page 6 under the heading ‘GRENFELL’ mentions the death of Peter Kelly a “an old colonist” and mentions him as being 86 yrs]
Married 26th January 1846 at St John’s Church, Parramatta, NSW Charlotte Gilbert, they had 1 daughter (Mary Ann Kelly, Mrs Hurel) and 4 sons
Peter, John, Patrick & James)

Sue Davies on 28th April, 2017 wrote of John Hughes:

Before being sentenced, the jury found John Hughes guilty but recommended him to mercy because of his unblemished character. Compassion had no meaning for the aged judge who sentenced John to twenty years transportation. Petitions for mercy were immediately put in place and the three prisoners in Cardiff gaol appealed to their friends to show restraint and keep the peace so that the Rebeccaites might have a reduction of sentence. I have a copy of the letter printed in a book as a poster and signed John Hughes, David Jones and John Hugh (the latter just made a mark).
The National Library of Wales have a copy. On Van Diemen’s Land, John Hughes was admonished twice for misconduct but won a commendation for capturing a fellow convict who absconded. He was given 14 days solitary confinement for feigning illness. He became a timber cutter once released in 1857 and hired me to work for him. He had forgotten most of his Welsh and wrote in English.

Jan Gardner on 28th April, 2017 wrote of William Folder:

SOURCE: LINC
Tasmanian Government

Name:
Folder, William
Record Type:
Marriage Permissions
Ship/free:
Mary
Marriage to:
Allender, Sarah
Ship/free:
Free
Permission date:
11 Nov 1835
Index number:
24135
Record ID:
NAME_INDEXES:1250721
Resource
CON52/1/1 Page 55
RGD36/2 : 1835/3069

DEATH
Name:
Folder, William
Record Type:
Deaths
Gender:
Male
Age:
41
Date of death:
03 Mar 1853
Registered:
Clarence
Registration year:
1853
Record ID:
NAME_INDEXES:1195234
Resource
RGD35/1/22 no 71

On this death registration Henry ALLENDER, brother-in-law, is the informant.
Therefore William FOLDER’s birthdate would be around 1812

D Wong on 27th April, 2017 wrote of John Scoffle:

National Records of Scotland
Precognition against John Scoffle, Susan Mathies, Thomas McCallum, James Merry, Catherine Meikle, Catherine Barry for the crime of robbery, or theft, habit and repute, and previous conviction
Dates 1839

Accused John Scoffle, alias Schoffield or Coffin, weaver, Address: Ayr
Susan Mathies, alias Matheson, Address: Cross Street, Wallacetown, Ayrshire
Thomas McCallum, collier, Address: Cross Street, Wallacetown, Ayrshire
James Merry, alias Murray, shoemaker, Address: Ayr
Catherine Meikle, alias Michael, wife of John Meikle or Michael, sailor, m.s. Shaw, Address: Cross Street, Wallacetown, St. Quivox, Ayrshire
Catherine Barry, Address: Gordon Street, Newton, Ayr

Catherine Barry, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty - recommendation for leniency, Sentence: Transportation - 10 years. Note: Jury recommended pannel to the leniency of the Court owing to there being no evidence that ‘their crime was the result of any long conceived design’.
(Gilbert Henderson 1840 to VDL).

Catherine Meikle, alias Michael, wife of John Meikle or Michael, sailor, m.s. Shaw, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty - recommendation for leniency, Sentence: Transportation - 10 years. Note: Jury recommended pannel to the leniency of the Court owing to there being no evidence that ‘their crime was the result of any long conceived design’.
(Gilbert Henderson 1840 to VDL).

John Scoffle, alias Schoffield or Coffin, Verdict: Guilty, Sentence: Transportation - 14 years

James Merry, alias Murray, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty - recommendation for leniency, Sentence: Transportation - 10 years. Note: Jury recommended pannel to the leniency of the Court owing to there being no evidence that ‘their crime was the result of any long conceived design’.
(Asia 1840 to VDL).

Thomas McCallum, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty - recommendation for leniency, Sentence: Transportation - 10 years. Note: Jury recommended pannel to the leniency of the Court owing to there being no evidence that ‘their crime was the result of any long conceived design’.
(Asia 1840 to VDL).

Susan Mathies, alias Matheson, Verdict: Guilty, Sentence: Transportation - 14 years.
(Gilbert Henderson 1840 to VDL).

John Scoffle is not listed on the NSW Gov. Convict Records.  He was sent to Norfolk Island, left per ‘Duke of Richmond’ on 23/2/1844 and arrived in VDL on 12/3/1844.

John was then described as: 31 years old, 5’3 1/2” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, brown whiskers, light grey eyes, M D and blue mark on left arm, lancet mark on right arm, scar on left eyebrow, can read.

22/1/11850: TOL
16/3/1852: TOL revoked, absent from muster.
17/5/1852: TOL/Misconduct in presenting himself to be free and trying to procure a special clearance - nine months hard labour - TOL revoked. Not to enter service in Hobart or Launceston.

10/11/1853: COF

5/4/1859 The South Australian Advertiser:
John Scoffle tendered for making the ford over the Wakefield, near Kerconda for £25.17.04 - his bid was accepted.

Nothing found on the SA, Vic, or NSW BDM,s.

Suzanne Burns on 27th April, 2017 wrote of Catherine Blakeney:

Exact date of Catherine’s death unknown - grave is no longer visible in Gray Street, Mount Gambier

D Wong on 27th April, 2017 wrote of Joseph Byron:

Convict No. 9104.
Joseph Byron was transported for ‘Insubordination’.

Occupation: Bricklayer/soldier.

Joseph was 33 years old on arrival, he was subgkem 5’6 1/4” tall, light brown hair, hazel eyes, round face, dark complexion, stout, mark of ulcer sores on left arm and throat.

11/10/1869: TOL
1872: Conditional Release. Labourer, cutter wood, teamster.
21/7/1874: COF

No marriage or children found.

30/4/1890: Fremantle Prison database gives this as the date Joseph died as a pauper, on the WA BDM it gives his age as 57.  The following comes from ‘Trove’ so the date of death is not accurate.

5/5/1890: The Daily News, Perth:
Joseph Byron was sentenced to seven days’ imprisonment for having been found lying drunk on the North Fremantle bridge at half-past ten o’clock on Sunday morning.

6/5/1890 The West Australian, Perth:
Joseph Byron, known as ” Rocky Bay Joe,” was sent to prison for seven days, for having been drunk on 1890 Sunday.

Michael Barlow on 27th April, 2017 wrote of William Barlow:

Was a protestant, single no children, could read and write
Complexion - Ruddy, Hair - Brown, Eyes - Grey
Cast outwards in right eye and nearly blind of it
Anchor,WB, and 1813 inside lower left arm.
Scar inside left thumb
5’5” tall
Occupation was a calendrer (
Former conviction 3 months for unknown.

Iris Dunne on 27th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Horn:

Trial 16 February 1824
Crime - Murder, she pleaded not guilty

Phil Hands on 27th April, 2017 wrote of Uriah Moses:

On the 8th December, 1797, Uriah was arrested for cutting the glass in a window of a draper’s shop in Whitechapel and stealing a quantity of the merchandise on display in the window. On the convict records his occupation was listed as glass cutter and he would certainly have had the skills to cut the glass in the shop window. Unfortunately he cut his hand and was arrested at Guy’s hospital where he was receiving medical attention for the wounded hand. He was taken to Newgate Gaol where he awaited his trial which was held at the Old Bailey a month later on 10 January 1798, At the trial Uriah was accused of stealing seven silk handkerchiefs, thirty yards of lace, and fifty-eight yards of calimanco, from William Holmes, a linen-draper and mercer. Apparently a piece of diamond was found near the window and there were traces of blood on some of the remaining items. After removing the items from the shop he had taken them to the house of Ann Benjamin who was also accused of receiving stolen goods. Ann gave him an old shawl to wrap around his cut hand and told him to go to the hospital. Uriah appears to have kept one card of lace which was found under the mattress of the hospital bed. When questioned about the cut hand Uriah said that he was carrying a teapot when crossing London Bridge and ‘tumbled down and cut his hand with the pieces’. Uriah was found guilty and received the death sentence which was later commuted to transportation for life. By this time Uriah was probably 18 years old.
He was taken back to Newgate where he remained for a year before being taken, on 14th February 1799, to Portsmouth where he spent the next 14 months on the Prison Hulk ‘Lion’, moored in the harbour. The hulks were old, rotten ships, used to house convicts while they waited for a ship to take them to Australia. Eventually Uriah was taken aboard his transportation vessel.
Left England on 23rd May 1800.
Ship:- the ‘Royal Admiral’ sailed with 300 male convicts on board of which 43 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 20th November 1800.

In the 1806 he is recorded as working as an assigned convict to George Smith on land in the Hawkesbury area near Windsor.
In February 1809 a record in the Colonial Secretary’s papers mentions that Uriah had delivered produce to the Hawkesbury government stores. Uriah therefore may have acquired a holding of land in the Windsor area and started growing enough grain to sell some of it. 
In 1812 Uriah received his ticket of leave which allowed him to work for himself, provided that he stayed in a specified area and reported regularly to authorities.
By 1818 Uriah had three acres of land on which he grew wheat, seven acres for growing maize and he owned 14 hogs. By 1819 his land holdings had increased to 12 acres.
On 25th October 1821 he received his conditional pardon, when he then set up shop in Windsor, baking bread, a business that stayed in the family for almost 150 years, he continued to supply wheat to the Government Stores.
From his humble beginnings Uriah had become a wealthy man. As well as the properties used for growing grain.he appears to have owned a number of properties in Windsor including properties in George Street and Macquarie Street. One of the properties, 68 George Street, still exists today.
He was also a money lender of some consequence

He was 50 when on 9th March 1830 he married Ann Daley (daughter of convicts Charles Daley, ‘Boddingtons’ 1793 & Hannah Alderson, ‘Speke I’ 1808) at Windsor, she was aged 20. Both made a mark in the register. They had 9 children between 1830-1846, 4 of whom died in infancy.

Uriah died on 5th December 1847, he had converted from his Jewish faith eleven days before and was buried with other family members at St Matthew’s Church of England, Windsor on 7th December.
Bell’s Life in Sydney and Sporting Reviewer, Saturday 11th December 1847:

Also, on Sunday, the 5th instant, at his residence, George-street, Windsor, after a protracted illness of some months, which he bore with Christian fortitude, Mr. Uriah Moses, aged 70, leaving a wife and six children to lament their loss. Mr. Moses was one of the oldest hands in the Colony, and universally esteemed by all who knew him. His remains were followed to their last resting place, St. Mathew’s cemetery, on Tuesday evening last, by a numerous and highly respectable body of friends.

On 4th March 1869, Uriah’s widow, Ann, married James Powell who was described as a gentleman of Randwick, he was the son of Edward Powell who first came as a seaman on the ‘Lady Juliana’. Edward then returned on the ‘Belonia’ as one of the first free settlers in 1793 and founded the Powell family, informally with Sarah Dorset and formally with Elizabeth Fish. 

Ann died on 12th June 1880 and was buried at St Matthew’s cemetery in Windsor with other members of the Moses family including Uriah

Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t17980110-8

73. URIAH MOSES , and ANN BENJAMIN , were indicted, the first, for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Holmes , about the hour of six in the night of the 8th of December , and stealing seven silk handkerchiefs, value 30s. thirty yards of lace, value 30s. and fifty-eight yards of calimanco, value 40s. the property of the said William ; and Ann Benjamin, for feloniously receiving seven silk handkerchiefs, fifteen yards of lace, and fifty-eight yards of calimanco, part of the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .
WILLIAM HOLMES sworn. - I am a linen-draper and mercer , in Whitechapel : On Friday the 8th of December, the glass of my shop-window was cut, and several articles missing, four or five cards of black lace, some is what is called British lace, two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, and two pieces of calimanco, one was brown, the other drab colour; the whole of them were worth, I suppose, seven or eight pounds, the calimancos are worth about thirty shillings each, the silk handkerchiefs are worth about thirty-five shillings, the lace I cannot exactly say what quantity there was of them, they had been cut, and therefore I cannot say.
Q. What time did you discover that these things had been taken away? - A. About six in the evening; I discovered it by seeing the window broke, and missing the things; I did not hear the window break; next morning, the officers belonging to the Whitechapel office produced part of my property; a number of the things in the window were tinged with blood, the edges of the papers were as if somebody had cut their hand, and drawn it down.
Q.Did it appear to be cut with a diamond? - A. Yes, there was a piece left by the frame; some of the glass remained in the inside of the window, and some out.
Q. Who was it produced them to you? - A.Thomas Griffiths.
SARAH HENLEY sworn. - I am a night nurse at Guy’s-hospital: The prisoner, Moses, came to the hospital on Wednesday, and came out on Friday the 8th of December; he was taken out by some men that came after him, the constables.
Q. Do you remember if he was in the hospital on Friday the 8th of December? - A. I saw him coming down stairs with two men as I went up stairs, about eight o’clock in the evening; I always go to bed in the afternoon, and come to the hospital about eight, he never returned to the hospital again; I went up to the ward where he had slept, about ten o’clock, and in examining his bed I found a card of lace. (Produces it.)
Holmes. This lace has my private mark upon it; I had put it in the window on the 8th of December, in the morning.
Mr. Agar. Q.Have you any partners? - A. No.
JOHN NOWLAN sworn. - I am a constable: On the 8th of December, I took the prisoner into custody in Guy’s-hospital; the back part of his hand was cut in several places, here is a part of a shawl which I found in the bed where he was, very bloody, (produces it); I asked him how he cut his hand; he told me he was at his father’s, in Petticoat-lane, and as he was going over London-bridge, he had a tea-pot in his hand, he tumbled down and cut his hand with the pieces.
Cross-examined by Mr. Agar. Q.There were a great number of people in the room where he slept? - A. Yes, a great number.
Q. You found nothing upon him when you took him? - A. Only two knives.
Q. No diamond? - A. No.
Q. At that time he was in bed? - A. Yes; he said he had been in bed about half an hour, it was then a quarter after seven o’clock.
THOMAS GRIFFITHS sworn. - I am a peace officer; I went to Mrs. Benjamin’s house on the 8th of December, between six and seven in the evening, in consequence of an information, I went in company with John Griffiths and Edward Smith, two other officers; when we came there, I found Mrs. Benjamin, and two or three women, sitting in the room on the right hand side as we went in; I then asked her what was become of the property that was brought in by three or four boys a little before; she said, be quiet a bit, you will spoil me; says she, if you will stop a little I shall have a good thing for you by and by; I then insisted upon her going with me up stairs, to see where this property was; she, in company with Edward Smith and myself, went into the one pair of stairs back room, and between the bed and the sacking, I found this property. (Produces them).
Q.How came you to look there? - A. I turned up the clothes, and found it upon the sacking; when I counted over the things, I found three pieces of lace, two pieces of silk handkerchiefs, containing seven handkerchiefs, and these two pieces of calimanco, one piece with a good deal of blood on the paper; I then asked Mrs. Benjamin what was become of the boys that brought it into the house; she said, she believed one boy was gone to Guy’s-hospital, that he had cut his hand, that it bled very much, and she had lent him an old shawl to wrap round his hand to dry up the blood; I then came down stairs and took the property to the office, leaving her in custody with Griffiths and Smith.
Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. I believe you found that this house was a house let cut to lodgers? - A. The door of the apartment they generally sleep in themselves was locked.
Q. I ask you if you do not know that this house was let out to lodgers? - A. There are other people in the house.
Q. Do you not know that this very room was occupied by another person of the name of Ann Smith? - A. I believe there was a woman that slept in that room.
Q. You had seen the boys immediately before you went to this house? - A. No; I went down immediately upon my getting the information.
Q. Did not Mrs. Benjamin give you information, before you went up stairs, where these things were to be found? - A. I believe she said they were in the one pair of stairs back room.
Q.Did she not tell you, that that room belonged to Ann Smith ? - A. That might have passed; I cannot swear that it did not.
Q. The person whom she represented as having cut his hand, was apprehended? - A. Yes.
Q.Did he appear to have that bloody appearance upon his hand that she represented? - A. Yes.
Q. Then, in short, the account that she gave, turned out to be true? - A. Yes.
Q. And the information that she gave you, led to the discovery of this business? - A. Yes.
Court. Q. Had she told you the things were in the back room, before you insisted upon going up stairs? - A. I believe, when we were going up stairs, she said something about it, but I do not recollect whether she did or not.
Holmes. I lost these things from my window, the handkerchiefs I cannot swear to, my private mark has been rubbed off, it was put on with a red lead pencil; they are the same sort of handkerchiefs, and the number that I had lost, it was a piece; I had divided it that morning into four handkerchiefs, and three handkerchiefs; the calimancos and lace had my private mark upon them.
Jury. (To Griffiths.) Q. Was Smith, who rented this room, below with Mrs. Benjamin, at the time you went in? - A. I believe she was.
Moses’s defence. I know nothing at all of it.
Benjamin’s defence. I am a married woman, I am very innocent of it, I follow no business, but let my house in lodgings, the officer, Smith, came in first, and I told him, when he asked me, that there was somebody went up to Mary with a bundle; he asked me to let him have a candle, and I said, I could not give him the candle, because it was Friday night.
EDWARD SMITH sworn. - I went into the house first, and I asked her where the property was that was just come into the house, it could not have been in the house above five or six minutes; we ran as fast as we could; upon receiving the information, she desired I would make no noise, and desired I would keep out of sight, she expected the boys back in a minute, that she had paid nothing for them, and if I made a noise I should spoil it; I asked her for a candle to go up stairs, and she said she could not touch it, on account of her sabbath, it was past six o’clock; I took the candle, and went up myself, and found nothing; I returned down again, and then she, and I and Griffiths went up together, and she showed us where the property was; she then told us, that the boy, that she supposed had cut the window, had cut his hand; she had lent him a shawl, that he was gone to the hospital, and had taken the best piece of lace with him.
Q. Was any thing said about a woman of the name of Smith? - A. Not that I recollect; she said it was in the girl’s room; she keeps lodgers.
Q. That was after you returned, and could not find it? - A. Yes; her own room door was locked, and her husband was out with the key.
Cross-examined by Mr. Knapp. Q. When you went up first, you could not get into the room? - A. No.
Q. You did search that room afterwards? - A. Yes; she has lodgers in the house that men came to see.
For the prisoners.
ELIZABETH HICKS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Agar. Q. Do you know the character of this boy? - A. No; I know his mother is a very honest hard working woman.
HANNAH SMITH sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. I am servant to Mrs. Benjamin.
Q. Is she a married woman? - A. Yes.
Q. Do you remember this day, when some boys brought something to the house? - A. Yes; a boy brushed up with something in his hand.
Q. Was this house let out in lodgings? - A. Yes.
Q. Was there a woman of the name of Smith lodged in the house, besides you? - A. Yes; in the back room one pair, I was in the parlour when the boy came in.
Q. Where was you mistress at that time? - A. She was gone to a public-house to get change for a guinea.
Q. Does the parlour door open into the passage? - A. Yes.
Q. Was there more than one boy? - A. I saw no more, he ran up stairs as quick as possible.
Q. What is this Ann Smith? - A. I believe she is a lone woman by herself; I cannot say much of her.
Examined by the Court. Q.What became of the boy? - A. I went after him, and he said he wanted to speak to Mr. Benjamin, I told him he was not at home, nor Mrs. Benjamin, and in the mean time she came, and I came away directly, I did not see what passed.
Q. You did not see her give him the shawl? - A. No; I did not see any thing at all of it.
KITTY JACOBS sworn. - Examined by Mr. Agar. I keep a glass shop in Petticoat-lane, Moses worked three years with my husband; I found him very honest while he lived with me, he has been gone away three years; I have known Mrs. Benjamin five years, she was a very honest woman before she was married, and ever since, as far as I know.
FRANCES JEWELL sworn. - I have known Mrs. Benjamin these seven years, she lived servant with me, and a very honest hard working girl she was.
Court. Q. How long is it since she left your service? - A. Seven years ago.
Moses called three other witnesses, and Mrs. Benjamin one other witness, who gave them a good character.
Moses GUILTY Death .
Of stealing the goods, but not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .
Benjamin, GUILTY .
Transported for fourteen years .
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Bron Larner on 27th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Horn:

A most interesting account of her crime can be found here: an on-line book published by J. J. Knight in 1895: and the son of her victim went on to become a very important man in Queensland public life. https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/data/UQ_216513/AU4015_In_the_Early_Days_Queensland.pdf?Expires=1493268776&Signature=YYB3uOcwgU~AfeIIm-2zoSeQThUUFKDY91ImI2I-7mbv1pV6CA3PQVtl84S3XaVH66iZPuXhzeJaPGz80dKtKM4a8DmfOPQGVktb3p2Z-ocslgrwu3xFyGQ0h1OVQcK~nOkLevd1I1BhJ~9EesN4TorRlzNYnnNGnFQuaCGAPvZui5V3S1bPWZMVRfpmugokrprrnre3cslldoEUVZCO1R70Uk~~T9tqC2uZhAg26MSmov8Q9BYqDbNyxIw5u06PeVBWqQk7gQBnLVbPDG6De7GDNFUDKx8Bouxz5vnE7VMgcThg0IvuWB8mPRRpuaozkvU8GzU-4CDg9Br-bcl-uA__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJKNBJ4MJBJNC6NLQ

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Mary Ann Pray:

Old Bailey:
ELLEN WALKER, MARY ANN PRAY, Theft > housebreaking, 22nd June 1826.

Offence: Theft > housebreaking
Verdict: Guilty; Guilty
Punishment: Death; Death

ELLEN WALKER and MARY ANN PRAY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James White, about seven o’clock in the forenoon of the 4th of June , at St. Luke ( Elizabeth White and William White being therein) and stealing 1 needle-case value 1/2d.; 4 half-crowns, 3 sixpences, and the sum of 3s. in copper monies numbered, the property of the said James White.

WALKER - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 37.
PRAY - GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 37.

Ellen Walker arriver per ‘Princess Charlotte 1827’ to NSW.

Mary Ann Pray was 38 years old on arrival in VDL.  She was born in Wanington.

Mary Ann was 4’11” tall, brown hair, grey eyes, married: Husband, Emanuel Pray.

1832 Muster: Assigned to Mr. Day
1833 Muster: Assigned to Mr. R. Dry
1835 Muster: TOL

20/12/1838: CP
15/6/1842: Free Pardon.

26/12/1864: Married James Joss, aged 65, (Lord Hungerford 1821) Mary Ann also 65, at Launceston.

Terry M Walsh on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Ware:

Catherine married John Ware(a convict arriving in VDL on 17 Feb 1847 onboard ‘Pestonjee Bomanjee’)on 3 Sep 1855.

Terry M Walsh on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Catherine Condon:

Catherine married John Ware(a convict arriving in VDL on 17 Feb 1847 onboard ‘Pestonjee Bomanjee’)on 3 Sep 1855.

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Shackleton:

5 Dec 1855:  Found guilty, in Hobart Supreme Court, of the manslaughter of his wife Margaret Shakleton/Butler.  Sentence - Transportation for Life.  (ref. Tasmanian Daily News 5 Dec 1855 - trove.nla.gov.au)

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Shackleton:

John SHACKLETON was convicted at Lancaster, England on 11 April 1842 for Larceny - stealing cotton cloth. Previous convictions. 10yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Marquis of Hastings’ arriving 8 Nov 1842.

Aged 40 yrs; married man; drover & waggoner; Protestant; can read’ 5’9 1/4”; fresh complexion; brown hair; Hazel eyes; stout; lost part of a finger.
Native place of Birth:Yorkshire, England.
VDL:
2 and half years Probation Period.
Assigned to work service.

23 May 1848: Ticket of Leave granted.
15 Oct 1850: Conditional Pardon approved.
4 June 1852: Free Certificate issued.

Application for Permission to Marry:
16 Apr 1850: Margaret BUTLER (per ‘Tasmania’) to John SHACKLETON (per ‘Marquis of Hastings’). Approved. (ref. 52/1/3 pg 411)

Marriage:
24 May 1850 Margaret BUTLER, aged 35yrs, servant to John SHACKLETON, aged 42yrs, labourer at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Hobart, Tas. (ref. 37/1/9 no. 499)

5 Dec 1852: John SHACKLETON left VDL per ship ‘Clarence’ from Launceston to Melbourne, Victoria. (Ship to Colony - Marquis of Hastings). ref. 220/1/2 pg 261)  Date of return not noted.

Margaret BUTLER died on 4 Nov 1855, aged 31yrs. Cause of death - fractures & contusions. Her husband John SHACKLETON was gaoled for her manslaughter.

7 Nov 1855: Inquest into the death of Margaret SHACKLETON (Butler). (ref. SC195/1/37 no. 3649)

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

Application for Permission to Marry:
16 Apr 1850: Margaret BUTLER (per ‘Tasmania’) to John SHACKLETON (per ‘Marquis of Hastings’). Approved. (ref. 52/1/3 pg 411)

Marriage:
24 May 1850 Margaret BUTLER, aged 35yrs, servant to John SHACKLETON, aged 42yrs, labourer at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Hobart, Tas. (ref. 37/1/9 no. 499)

Margaret BUTLER died on 4 Nov 1855, aged 31yrs. Cause of death - fractures & contusions. Her husband John SHACKLETON was gaoled for her manslaughter.

7 Nov 1855: Inquest into the death of Margaret SHACKLETON (Butler). (ref. SC195/1/37 no. 3649)

Children:
William BUTLER admitted to Queens Orphan School on 9 Dec 1845 aged 10yrs.  Discharged on 17 Jan 1847 to Rev. Richard Walsh, Geelong, Victoria.

Mary Ann BUTLER admitted to Queens Orphan School on 14 May 1846 aged 2 yrs. Discharged 10 June 1851 to her mother.  Readmitted on 7 Dec 1855 following the death of her mother.  Discharged on 7 Jan 1859 to Mrs. Mary O’Boyle of Hobart. (Ref. SWD7, 28, CSD 1/71/1818)

Terry M Walsh on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Catherine Condon:

Arrived in Van Diemen’s Land on 24 Feb 1853 and was later assigned to Charles Wilcock, Clarence Plains.

Nell Murphy on 26th April, 2017 wrote of Margaret Butler:

Aged 22 yrs; single woman; farm servant; 5’1”; brown complexion; black hair; dk brown eyes;Roman Catholic.
Native place: Carlow, Ireland.
Brothers: Richard & James
Sisters: Biddy & Mary

VDL:
6mths Probation Period. Station Gang: ‘Anson’ Hulk.

23 Dec 1852: Free Certificate issued.

D Wong on 26th April, 2017 wrote of John Tucker:

John Tucker was tried in London in 1789, aged about 30, for ‘stealing various items including 490 yards of linen’. He was on board the ship ‘Active’.  His step-mother, Mary Tucker was transported on the Neptune in 1790, for ‘receiving some of the stolen property’.
Soon after arrival he was assigned to the Sydney Commissariat as an assistant storekeeper.

In 1794 he married Ann Viles/Vales, the widow of Nicholas Viles/Vales who died in 1792. Ann was transported along with Nicholas on the Royal Admiral 1792.  Their 2 children, Ann and Sarah were with them, Ann died in 1792 and Sarah in 1793.
John and Ann had two children while in Sydney, John jnr born in 1795 and Charlotte in 1797.

In 1803 John Tucker was promoted to the position of storekeeper with an annual salary of £50. In 1804 he was appointed as the first storekeeper at Newcastle, sacked in 1805 and reappointed in 1807.
He was allowed to take up land on the Paterson River about 1812.
In 1823 John retired from his position in Newcastle and moved to his land at Paterson’s Plains that he named ‘Albion Farm’.

23/6/1834: John died at Albion Farm - Ann died in 1839.  Both are buried at ‘Albion Farm’.

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