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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Fisher:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 married protestant with 4 children (possibly mother of Ann Fisher. From same place tried same date for the same crime and received same sentence) Wife of George Fisher 5’ 0 3/4” dark sallow complexion dark brown hair brown eyes assigned to James Reed. ToL 32/696 cert 42/518

New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869 for Elizabeth Fisher Allowed to stay in Maitland district

Penny-Lyn Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of William Cheetham:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Death Register, 1826-1879
Ship; Prince of Orange
Age - 32
Died - St James Sydney. 18 January 1828

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Ann Fisher:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 Age 13 from Gloucester single protestant who could read. 5’ 0 1/4” sandy hair fair and pock pitted grey to hazel eyes. assigned to Nicholas Devine Cert 42/517

Ann Fisher in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 11/1/1830
Name: Ann Fisher Assigned to James Reed good character
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1816
Age: 14
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Tottenham
Spouse Name: James Talent Farmer at Wallis Plains and is free. 7 yrs
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1801
Spouse Age: 29
Spouse Arrival Year:  1818
Spouse Vessel: Competitor 2
Marriage Year: Abt 1830
Application Date: 11 Jan 1830
Application Place: Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

New South Wales, Australia, Certificates of Freedom, 1842 42/517 Wife of James Talent per ship Tottenham

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of James Talent:

Ann Fisher in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 11/1/1830
Name: Ann Fisher Assigned to James Reed good character
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1816
Age: 14
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Tottenham
Spouse Name: James Talent Farmer at Wallis Plains and is free. 7 yrs
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1801
Spouse Age: 29
Spouse Arrival Year:  1818
Spouse Vessel: Competitor 2
Marriage Year: Abt 1830
Application Date: 11 Jan 1830
Application Place: Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Mary Jane Field:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 From Chelsea single protestant who could read and write 5’ 1 1/2” sallow complexion brown hair and eyes cert 35/629 assigned to Dr Halloran

Mary Jane Field
in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 4/7/1829
Name: Mary Jane Field Good character and consent given by Rev Dr Halloran
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1809
Age: 20
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Mangles 1
Spouse Name: William Fletcher good character ToL no 28/535 received life. Master William Cape Junior
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1801
Spouse Age: 28
Spouse Arrival Year: 1820
Spouse Vessel: Competitor
Marriage Year: Abt 1829
Application Date: 4 Jul 1829
Application Place: Saint James Church, New South Wales, Australia

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Margaret Ellis:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 Single protestant who could read 5’ 0 1/4” dark ruddy freckled complexion dark brown hair and eyes. Described as a stout built brunette. Assigned to Robert Henderson cert no 35/489

Margaret Ellis
in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 29/5/1829
Name: Margaret Ellis Servant of William Henderson of Brisbane Waters. Appears to be a quiet industrious young lady
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1807
Age: 22
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Marquis of Wellington
Spouse Name: Andrew Roke Overseer to William Bean. A very good character to his present and former master> Has been with his present master 4 1/2 years and held a ToL for 10 years. Honest and industrious and a catholic
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1794
Spouse Age: 35
Spouse Arrival Year: 1815
Spouse Vessel: Competitor
Marriage Year: Abt 1829
Application Date: 29 May 1829
Application Place: Brisbane Water, New South Wales, Australia

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of George Thatcher:

Old Bailey Online
194. ANDREW ROKE and GEORGE THATCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , forty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 4 l. 16 s. the property of John Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN EVANS . I am an assistant to John Hughes , linen-draper in Holborn . I live at 280, Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. George’s in the Fields. On Saturday the 29th of January, about three in the afternoon, I perceived these two pieces of print taken down from where I put them in the morning. I perceived the two prisoners walking up and down before the house, and I saw these two pieces of print taken off the line where they were put in the morning by themselves.

Q. Where was the linen - A. Inside of the shop. They were hanging up inside of the shop. I cannot say who took them down. When I perceived them taken down I went into one corner of the shop and watched, having suspicion. I watched the prisoners walking up and down at one corner of the shop; after the prints were taken down I watched there for a quarter of an hour, and when they had an opportunity the prisoner Roke came in and put one of them on the top of the other.

Q. Roke entered the shop, did he - A. Yes, and put one of the prints on the other; he clapped his apron over them.

Q. He had an apron on then - A. Yes, he was in the act of taking them away; somebody came past at the time.

Q. Had he moved them from where they were - A. Yes; he had taken them down from where I put them. Somebody coming past at the time, Thatcher gave him a signal to be off. Thatcher was waiting outside at the door at the time; somebody came by; he gave him a signal to run off. I pursued him; both run off contrary ways. I pursued, and took the prisoner Roke; Christopher Truman took Thatcher.

CHRISTOPHER TRUMAN . I was in the shop; as soon as I was disengaged the other witness came up, and told me that the prints were not in the same state as he put them in the morning; that he had seen the prisoners walk by the shop several times. I then went and watched as well as him. I observed the prisoners walk by the shop twice; the third time the prisoner Roke stepped into the shop; he took one piece of print up from a box; he put it on the other; he put his apron over it, and as he was going to take it away the other prisoner gave him a signal that somebody was coming.

Q.What was the signal - A. He touched him, which I understood to be a signal; then he dropped the print out of his apron, and run away. One of the pieces of print cost Mr. Hughes two shillings and four pence a yard, and the other one shilling and ten pence. They are forty-eight yards; twenty-four yards each. That was the prime cost.

Roke’s Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

Thatcher’s Defence. I was twenty yards off when one of these gentlemen took me.

Roke called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

ROKE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

THATCHER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of their good character.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Andrew Roke:

Old Bailey Online
194. ANDREW ROKE and GEORGE THATCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , forty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 4 l. 16 s. the property of John Hughes , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN EVANS . I am an assistant to John Hughes , linen-draper in Holborn . I live at 280, Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. George’s in the Fields. On Saturday the 29th of January, about three in the afternoon, I perceived these two pieces of print taken down from where I put them in the morning. I perceived the two prisoners walking up and down before the house, and I saw these two pieces of print taken off the line where they were put in the morning by themselves.

Q. Where was the linen - A. Inside of the shop. They were hanging up inside of the shop. I cannot say who took them down. When I perceived them taken down I went into one corner of the shop and watched, having suspicion. I watched the prisoners walking up and down at one corner of the shop; after the prints were taken down I watched there for a quarter of an hour, and when they had an opportunity the prisoner Roke came in and put one of them on the top of the other.

Q. Roke entered the shop, did he - A. Yes, and put one of the prints on the other; he clapped his apron over them.

Q. He had an apron on then - A. Yes, he was in the act of taking them away; somebody came past at the time.

Q. Had he moved them from where they were - A. Yes; he had taken them down from where I put them. Somebody coming past at the time, Thatcher gave him a signal to be off. Thatcher was waiting outside at the door at the time; somebody came by; he gave him a signal to run off. I pursued him; both run off contrary ways. I pursued, and took the prisoner Roke; Christopher Truman took Thatcher.

CHRISTOPHER TRUMAN . I was in the shop; as soon as I was disengaged the other witness came up, and told me that the prints were not in the same state as he put them in the morning; that he had seen the prisoners walk by the shop several times. I then went and watched as well as him. I observed the prisoners walk by the shop twice; the third time the prisoner Roke stepped into the shop; he took one piece of print up from a box; he put it on the other; he put his apron over it, and as he was going to take it away the other prisoner gave him a signal that somebody was coming.

Q.What was the signal - A. He touched him, which I understood to be a signal; then he dropped the print out of his apron, and run away. One of the pieces of print cost Mr. Hughes two shillings and four pence a yard, and the other one shilling and ten pence. They are forty-eight yards; twenty-four yards each. That was the prime cost.

Roke’s Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

Thatcher’s Defence. I was twenty yards off when one of these gentlemen took me.

Roke called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

ROKE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

THATCHER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of their good character.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Margaret Ellis in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 29/5/1829
Name: Margaret Ellis Servant of William Henderson of Brisbane Waters. Appears to be a quiet industrious young lady
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1807
Age: 22
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Marquis of Wellington
Spouse Name: Andrew Roke Overseer to William Bean. A very good character to his present and former master> Has been with his present master 4 1/2 years and held a ToL for 10 years. Honest and industrious and a catholic
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1794
Spouse Age: 35
Spouse Arrival Year: 1815
Spouse Vessel: Competitor
Marriage Year: Abt 1829
Application Date: 29 May 1829
Application Place:Brisbane Water, New South Wales, Australia

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Ann Donelly:

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 married with 2 kids protestant who could not read or write. 2 previous convictions. 5’ 2 1/4” fair and pitted complexion dark brown hair and grey eyes. Assigned to James Atkinson. Husband is J Donelly at Durham

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Jane Dixon:

Old bailey online
1053. JANE DIXON was indicted for stealing, on the 11th of April , 1 shawl, value 2s. 6d., the goods of James Martin Bass , from the person of Ruth Bass .
RUTH BASS. I am the wife of James Martin Bass. On the 11th of April, a little after eleven o’clock in the evening, I was with my husband going along Ratcliff-highway , my foot slipped, and I fell; a strange woman came up and offered to assist me, but she took my shawl off and ran away; I cannot say that it was the prisoner.

JAMES MARTIN BASS. I was behind my wife with the umbrella; she fell down, and I saw a woman come up to her - I cannot say it was the prisoner.

THOMAS CUNDALL . I am a watchman. I was coming along Shadwell; I saw several persons in the middle of the road; the prosecutor said “My wife has lost her shawl;” and some person said “There runs the woman” I took hold of the prisoner who was running with the shawl; I said “Give me that shawl;” I took her to the watch-house - she said “There is the shawl;” that was all that passed.(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner’s Defence. I was not running; I was standing at the corner of Bluegate-field - a man came up and gave me the shawl, and asked me to take a walk with him - the watchman came up and I gave it to him.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 Single 19 protestant who could read and write. Convicted of stealing a shawl. Born in London. 5’ 2” sallow and pock pitted dark brown hair and eyes Assigned to Esther Bigges. Cert 44/107 and 43/374

Jane Dixon
in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 2/6/1829
Name: Jane Dixon described as well conducted by mistress Esther Bigge.
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1809
Age: 20
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Asia 1
Spouse Name: Benjamin Johnson described as sober and industrious by his master James Mulligan
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1795
Spouse Age: 34
Spouse Arrival Year: 1820
Spouse Vessel: Competitor
Marriage Year: Abt 1829
Application Date: 2 Jun 1829
Application Place: St. Philips Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Rev William Cowper

New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930 for Jane Dixon
28/7/1835 sentenced to 1 month 3rd class factory
3/8/1841 Remanded

New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1837 assigned to Edward Gillet Sydney

Tony Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Benjamin Johnson:

Jane Dixon
in the New South Wales, Australia, Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 2/6/1829
Name:Jane Dixon described as well conducted by mistress Esther Bigge.
Gender: Female
Birth Year: abt 1809
Age: 20
Arrival year: 1828
Arriving Vessel: Asia 1
Spouse Name: Benjamin Johnson described as sober and industrious by his master James Mulligan
Spouse Gender: Male
Spouse Birth Year: 1795
Spouse Age: 34
Spouse Arrival Year: 1820
Spouse Vessel: Competitor
Marriage Year: Abt 1829
Application Date: 2 Jun 1829
Application Place: St. Philips Church, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Rev William Cowper

Penny-Lyn Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Jenny Renowdon:

Age: 29. Est birth year: 1791
Trail; Devon. 27 Jul 1818

1825 - Convict Muster.
Renowdon, Jenny, F.S. L. Wellington. 1820. 7 years. Housekeeper Sydney
Renowdon, Catherine. Age 7. Came Free. Child of Renowdon, Jenny,

Penny-Lyn Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Catherine Robertson:

1818 - Australia, Convict Index,
Name: Catherine Robertson. [Catherine Dudgeon]
Age: 22. Birth Year: abt 1798
Trial Place:  Edinburgh

1825 - General Muster. Convict. Wife of James Coin, ??  Newcastle

1829 - Certificate of Freedom. 11 Jun 1829.

Penny-Lyn Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Ellen Saunders:

1829 - 28 Dec. New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, No; 29/1114

Name: Ellen Saunders
Birth Year: 1773
Ticket Date: 28 Dec 1829
Origin: Staffordshire
Calling; Servant
Offence; No details
Date of Trial: 23 Jul 1818
Sentence; 14 years
Height; 5 ft. 1 1/4 inches
Complexion; Fair pale
Hair; Brown
Eyes; Bluish
Noted against name; Teeth prominent, Married Samuel Dunn of Sydney
Received Certificate of Freedom 25 Jul 1832.
———————-
1828 - Census
No; 32. Dunn, Samuel. F.S. Age 39. Ship; Granada. 1819. 7 years. Protestant. Dealer, York Street. Sydney
No; 33. Dunn, Eleanor. G.S. Age; 52. Ship; Wellington. 1819. 14 years. Protestant
———————
1824 - On list of convict servants maintained by George Druitt; in 1821-24
———————
1825 - On muster list of Government servants and free men maintained at Mount Druitt from 1 Oct 1824 to 1 Oct 1825
———————
1822 - 4 Jun. Re permission to marry at Castlereagh. Page: 380
Samuel Dunn - Convict per ship; Grenada,
Eleanor Saunders - Convict per ship; Lord Wellington
——————-
1822 - Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950
Name: Eleanor Saunders. Spouse Name: Samuel Dunn
Marriage Date: 1822. Marriage Place: New South Wales
Registration Place: Castlereagh, New South Wales. Registration Year: 1822. Volume Number: V

Penny-Lyn Beale on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Ann Smallman:

Ann Smallman - Lord Wellington

1819 - Trail; Middlesex, England. - 17 Feb 1819. Old Bailey Proceedings Online

ANN SMALLMAN, Theft > grand larceny, 17th February 1819.
488. ANN SMALLMAN was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of February , the sum of 8 s. in copper monies numbered , the monies of James Murray .

ELIZABETH MURRAY . I am the wife of James Murray , who is a shoemaker , and lives in Dudley-court, St. Giles’s . I had 8 s. in copper, which was in a tin cover behind the counter. I saw the prisoner come from behind the counter when I was in the back-room. I stopped her in the shop, and took the money out of her hand - she was a stranger.

Prisoner’s Defense. I was intoxicated.

GUILTY . Aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.
———————————-
1820 - 22 Aug. On list of female convicts embarked on “Princess Charlotte” for the public service in Van Diemen’s Land
———————————-
1820 - 07 Nov. Australia, Marriage Index,
Name: Ann Smallman. Spouse Name: Edward Hale
Marriage Date: 07 Nov 1820. Marriage Place: Tasmania
Registration Place: Hobart, Tasmania. Registration Year: 1820. Registration Number: 413

1823- Tasmania. Wife of Edward Hale

Lenora on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Amos Bradshaw:

I read that you have Ellen (Kidd) & Amos Bradshaw as having 7 children, that is not correct. At the time of Ellen’s death there were only 3 children. Amos remarried Maryann Donnovan and they had more children.

Maureen Withey on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Ann Taylor:

1828 Census Index.
Edward Taylor, age 47, T.L. per Fanny, 1816, 14 years, protestant. Shoemaker, Airds district.
Ann Taylor, age 44, G.S. Lord Melville, 1815, 14 years, protestant.
Edward Taylor, age 14, came free, Lord Melville, 1815.
Emma Taylor, age 10, born in colony.
James Ashton Taylor, age 7, b.c.

Maureen Withey on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Edward Taylor:

1828 Census Index.
Edward Taylor, age 47, T.L. per Fanny, 1816, 14 years, protestant. Shoemaker, Airds district.
Ann Taylor, age 44, G.S. Lord Melville, 1815, 14 years, protestant.
Edward Taylor, age 14, came free, Lord Melville, 1815.
Emma Taylor, age 10, born in colony.
James Ashton Taylor, age 7, b.c.

Maureen Withey on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Edward Taylor:

Colonial Secretary Index.

TAYLOR, Edward. Per “Atlas”.

1822 Nov 29 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3291; 4/4570D p.122)
1824 Mar 4 - To take charge of the grazing run of James Chilcot, 15 miles from Cookes River (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.437)
1824 Aug 17,31 - Re permission to marry at Castlereagh (Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.290)

Hazel Parker on 27th October, 2020 wrote of Mary Ann Hatch:

entered by Hazel Parker
Permission to Mary 1838, married
1625/1838 V18381625 22 FRENCH GEORGE HATCH MARY A CJ
George French arrived free on the ‘Tanmere’ and was about the same age as Mary Ann.
Death date is NOT May 11, 1865

Maureen Withey on 27th October, 2020 wrote of John Tawell:

Colonial Secretary Index.

TAWELL, John. Per “Marquis of Wellington”, 1815.

1815 Dec 16 - On list of convicts to be sent to Newcastle per “Estramina” (Reel 6004; 4/3494 p.286)
1818 Dec 7 - Servant to Isaac Wood at Sydney Academy. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3190; 4/1856 p.265)
1820 Jan 1,3,6 - Clerk to Richard Brooks; former servant to Isaac Wood at Sydney Academy. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3204; 4/1861 p.81)
1820 Jun 2-9 - Qualified to act as an apothecary. Granted a certificate of qualification to dispense medicines by the Medical Board (Reel 6049; 4/1744 p.75)
1822 Oct 3 - Apothecary of 18 Pitt Street. Testifying as to the character of William Taylor for a ticket of leave (Fiche 3228; 4/1868 pp.11, 13)
1822 Nov 7-1823 Jul 23 - On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D pp.20, 41, 63)
1825 May 9 - Signature in recommendation of Thomas William Middleton’s memorial re retaining the situation of Inspector of Cattle (Reel 6062; 4/1782 p.48c)
1825 Oct 7 - His wife & two sons came free per “Lord Sidmouth” in 1823. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3252; 4/1875 p.225). Reply, 10 Nov (Reel 6015; 4/3515 p.573)
———————————————————————————
1828 Census index.

John Tawell, age 44, F.S. Marq. Wellington, 1815, 7 years, protestant. Retired Apothecary, 22 Castlereagh St., Sydney. Has 884 acres of land, 75 of which are cleared and 37 cultivated. Has 1 horse and 1 cow.
Mary Tawell, age 38, Came free, Lord Sidmouth, 1823, protestant.
Wm. Hy. Tawell, age 17, came free, Lord Sidmouth 1823, protestant.

—————————————————————————

THE CONVICT JOHN TAWELL.
Since the murder of Lord William Russell by his valet, Couvoisier, in 1840, no event of a similar kind has produced so deep a feeling in the public mind as the “Salt-hill murder.” The early history of the convict, and the more recent events of his life, throw around the affair an air of romance. Transported upwards of a quarter of a century since for having a forged Bank of England note in his possession, he thus escaped the scaffold for a series of forgeries upon a local bank: the remarkable feature in that extraordinary incident of his life being, that, though the Bank of England note found in his possession when taken into custody on the more serious charge, was a forged one, yet he was guiltless of knowing it to be forged. It was, however, employed as the mode of extricating him from the consequences of the capital offence, for which — as the law then stood, and the almost invariable execution of its sentence upon all who were brought within its condemnation — he would doubtless have been hanged. Tawell was, therefore, only too glad to plead guilty to a charge which involved transportation, to escape the gallows. In the land of his banishment his good conduct attracted the favourable notice of, and eventually obtained from the authorities a ticket of leave, enabling him to pursue any avocation he pleased for his own benefit, and finally emancipation. He had some knowledge of chemistry, and opened a shop as a chemist and druggist in the town of Sydney, combining with the sale of drugs advice as to the mode of using them. His trade increased; and having “made some money,” he embarked it in a series of joint-stock trading speculations of a more extensive description, which also succeeded beyond his hopes. He subsequently purchased some shares in a whaler, and speculated in oil, in all which success crowned his exertions.  After residing in Sydney about fifteen years, John Tawell left the colony, which he entered as an outcast, a wealthy man.  He returned home, and to the neighbourhood in which he resided previous to his expatriation. His original offences against society, if not wholly forgotten, were well-nigh obliterated from the recollection of those who were acquainted with his early history. Such thought, and justly so, that the man who had redeemed his character in a penal colony by a course of industry and integrity, and who had returned home with the fruits of that industry and integrity, ought not to be placed beyond the circle of respectable society on account of offences for which he had repented, and was willing to atone by a future life of honesty and benevolence. Those who were young at the time of his departure from England, saw in John Tawell an intelligent, active, and prosperous man and knowing nothing which ought to deprive him of their respect, they received him to their circles, and co-operated with him in those benevolent exertions to which he was willing to contribute from his purse, and to aid by his personal exertions. One feature in his character at this season is remarkable; and it seems to have been the clue to, and the ruling desire of his life.  Before the forgery on the Uxbridge Bank was discovered, Tawell was a member of the Society of Friends. He was, as a necessary consequence of his detection as a forger, expelled from that respectable and strictly moral community. Since his return to England, his efforts to obtain a restoration to the Society have been incessant. He subscribed to their schools and to those benevolent objects in which the members of that sect are known to take a peculiar interest. He dressed in their distinctive garb; attended regularly their meetings for worship; and in every external circumstance sought to be considered as identified with their body.  With the characteristic caution of the members of that far-seeing sect, John Tawell was not permitted to be more than an outward court worshipper. In this we offer a willing tribute to the prudence, and zeal to preserve their body from reproach, by which the Society of Friends is characterised. By their undeviating prudence in such matters, they have, to a very considerable extent, been exempted from the pain of seeing their religious community brought under public odium, however ungenerous and unfounded, by the detection in their fellowship of those who dishonour and disgrace a religious profession by the commission of crime.
By his first wife the wretched man had two sons, both of whom were dead. The eldest, who was married, practised as a surgeon in London, and after his death his widow was chiefly supported by the charity of Tawell; but it is currently reported that lately he has not been so liberal in his allowance, assigning the same reason as it is supposed he did to the unfortunate victim of his cruelty, Sarah Hart, namely, the embarrassed state of his affairs in Australia.
On the death of Tawell’s first wife, he took another decided step to evince his ardent desire to be yet more closely associated with the Society of Friends. He had been introduced to a lady, a member of that community, by whom the mental endowments and moral qualities which constitute the excellence of the female character, were possessed in a somewhat extraordinary degree. Mrs. Cutforth was then a widow, having a daughter, by her deceased husband, of about seven years of age. Mr. Cutforth had been extensively engaged in trade, and was for a considerable time successful.  The failure of several firms led eventually, to his ruin; and although no imputation rested on his integrity, and no reproach was cast on his management, his health and spirits had sustained a shock from which they never recovered, and he gradually sunk into illness which terminated in death. His widow, aided by friends who knew her in prosperity, and respected her in adversity, opened a school in Northampton-square, at John-street, for the education of a few young ladies, chiefly members of Quaker families. The success which attended Mrs. Cutforth’s exertions for the respectable maintenance of herself and daughter, induced her to enter upon a larger establishment at Berkhampstead, which she was conducting with advantage when Tawell selected her as the object of his attentions, and eventually, against the advice and remonstrances of her best and most judicious friends, obtained her for his wife. They were married at the Registrar’s office, Berkhampstead, in February, 1841, as the Friends refused to grant permission for the marriage to be celebrated in their meeting-house; and the contracting parties not choosing, for obvious reasons, to have recourse to any other religious body. The immediate consequence of Mrs. Cutforth’s marriage to Tawall was, as usual in such cases, a “disowning” of her by a formal act of the “quarterly meeting” of “Friends,” the rules of that body not tolerating a union which is not first sanctioned by its members. Although excommunicated, the lady (now Mrs. Tawell) continued to attend meetings, and visited, and was visited in return, by her former friends. The school was given up. Tawell’s income was sufficient to maintain an establishment of respectability. They lived in considerable comfort and style.  He was active in the parish as a participator in its public business, and as a promoter of objects of benevolence. It was, however remarked that there was an air of bustle and self-importance about the man which showed a wish to make himself conspicuous, probably prompted by a self consciousness that there was something to be done in the eye of man, to enable him to secure a position to which his right might be, some time or other, questioned.
All this time, and while Tawell was endeavouring to earn back for himself reputation and respect, there was a deeply seated consciousness that he was in hourly danger of being exposed as a hypocrite and deceiver. During his first wife’s illness, which terminated in her death, Sarah Hart, a young woman of some attractions had been her nurse. Immediately after, if not before her death, an illicit intercourse had commenced between this woman and her master. It was continued at different places. Two children were its fruits. An allowance of one pound a week seems to have been paid for her maintenance by her seducer.  At length, wearied with the charge, or more probably prompted by fears of the effect upon his domestic peace and social position, should a discovery be made of his connexion with this woman, he planned and perpetrated her murder.  This was detected in a manner so surprising, brought home to him by a body of circumstantial evidence so complete, as to leave no doubt of his guilt, the atrocity of which removes all sympathy for his fate.
The Australian, 12 July 1845.

Hazel Parker on 26th October, 2020 wrote of Mary Ann Hatch:

by Hazel Parker.  Mary Ann Hatch, the convict, was christened 3.11.1811 at Hitcham, Buckinghamshire [Parish records]

[Mary Ann Hatch HUTLEY arrived on the ‘Queen Victoria’ 1841 and Married William Hutley at Calula May 5, 1944, died at Calula {Kerr’s Ck} May 11, 1865 of Natural Causes {coroner’s report}, leaving a family of 1 girl and 4 boys.]

Maureen Withey on 26th October, 2020 wrote of Thomas Talbot:

Public Notice.
The undermentioned Persons have obtained Certificates, or Tickets of Leave, during the last Week: 
TICKETS OF LEAVE.
Adamant …  Thomas Talbot, Camden ;
Sydney Gazette, 22 Dec 1825.

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THE undermentioned Persons have obtained Certificates of Freedom during the last Week; viz.
Adamant ..... Thomas Talbot
Sydney Gazette, 7 May 1828.

Maureen Withey on 26th October, 2020 wrote of Thomas Talbot:

Colonial Secretary Index.

TALBOT, Thomas. Per “Adamant”, 1821.

1822 Mar 22 - To be overseer of De Arrietta’s clearing gang (Reel 6009; 4/3505 p.65)
1822 - Testifying to character of John Ridout for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3225; 4/1867 p.37)
1822 - Overseer of clearing gang on the estate of Mr De Arrieta. Testifying to character of George Tarrant for ticket for leave (Fiche 3228; 4/1868 p.7)
1824 Feb 2 - Overseer of De Arrieta’s clearing gang; constable for Cowpastures district. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3243; 4/1872 p.106)
1824 Aug 3 - Re permission to marry at Sydney (Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.127)
1824 Oct 6 - Overseer of clearing party of Mr De Arrietta. Recommended for a ticket of leave (Reel 6027; 4/1716.1 pp.227-8)
1825 Oct 17 - Overseer of Government stock on Liverpool Road at Eleven Mile Station. Petition for restoration of his ticket of leave (Fiche 3252; 4/1875 p.223). Reply, 2 Dec (Reel 6016; 4/3516 p.69)
1825 Dec 2 - Restoration of ticket of leave (Reel 6027; 4/1717.2 pp.286-7)

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1828 Census index.
Thomas Talbot, age 47, F.S. Adamant, 1821, protestant, Farmer, Cobbety, Cooke district. Holds 200 acres of land, of which 100 are cleared and cultivated. Has 11 cattle.
Mary Talbot, age 55, G.S. Mary Ann, 1822, 14 years, protestant.

Maureen Withey on 26th October, 2020 wrote of John Tagget:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 26 October 2020), September 1821, trial of JOHN TAGGET (t18210912-3).
JOHN TAGGET, Theft > theft from a specified place, 12th September 1821.

1049. JOHN TAGGET was indicted for stealing, on the 4th of August , one hat, value 18 s.; two bonnets, value 14 s.; two veils, value 5 s.; one pair of gloves, value 6 d.; one gown, value 7 s.; one pair of stays, value 5 s.; two petticoats, value 3 s.; six knives and forks, value 7 s.; eight handkerchiefs, value 5 s.; six pair of stocking, value 3 s.; three shirts, value 5 s.; three pinafores value 1 s.; one shift value 2 s.; two watches, value 2 l.; three seals, value 30 s.; one key, value 5 s.; one ring, value 5 s., and one shawl, value 6 s., the goods of William Francis , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM FRANCIS . I rent a house in Little Guilford-street . On the 4th of August, about half-past five o’clock in the morning, I went out, and left every thing safe. I returned at nine o’clock, and found the door fast. My neighbours told me the house had been robbed. I went in, and missed the articles stated in the indictment.

JOHN PULLEN . I live at Francis’s house. He went out, I came down stairs, between five and six o’clock, and saw two men going out at the front door. The prisoner was one of them, he had a green bag on his back. I saw him with it in Woburn-place. They both went out of thehouse together, and one of them had the green bag then, but I cannot say which had it. One went one way, and the other another. I followed the prisoner, and kept him in sight all the way, they both ran as fast as they could. The prisoner had the green bag on his shoulder, in Woburn-place. I followed him down to the New-road, he was then walking, I got within fifty yards of him, I ran, and he then dropped the bag; I ran as far as the bag, and then was obliged to give up the pursuit - he escaped. His back was towards me. He turned round several times while I followed him, I saw his face. He was not taken till last Sunday; I am positive he is the man. I brought the bundle to Francis’s. Read took it to the office. It then contained part of the articles stated in the indictment. I know the prisoner to be the man, he lodged next door.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHN PAYNE . I live at Little Guilford-street. I got up about five o’clock in the morning, of the 4th of August, and was in my front room. I looked through the window about half-past five, and saw two men come out of Francis’s house, with a green bag, the prisoner was one of them, the other had the bag. I saw the prisoner’s face, as he came out; I knew him before well, he lived opposite. He had nothing in his hands, I did not follow him. Pullen came down to the door, looked out, and went into the passage again, then came out immediately, and called to know if I saw two men come out. I told him they were gone towards Woburn-place; he followed as hard as he could, and in about twenty minutes, I saw him return with the bag.

JAMES ELLIS . I am an officer. I received information that the prisoner lived in the neighbourhood of Well-street, and last Sunday I took him.

Prisoner’s Defence. My Lord, I feel confident from the evidence adduced against me, that it would be useless to say a word, but in mitigation. I simply, and humbly, throw myself on your mercy, and state, I was instigated to commit the crime through having in an unfortunate circumstance before done wrong, and lost my character. Wherever I applied for work I could not succeed, not having a character. My wife was ill, and I was driven to this by necessity.

GUILTY . Aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

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1828 Census index.
John Tagget, age 30, F.S. Guildford 1824, 7 years, protestant, Cabinet maker, Pitt St., Sydney.
Harriet Tagget, age 29, C.F. Hibernia, 1824, protestant.
Eliza Tagget, age 3, born in colony.
Josiah Jun. Tagget, age 14 months, b.c.

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