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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Maureen Withey on 18th July, 2019 wrote of Peter Rush:

RUSH, Peter. Per “Lord Sidmouth”, 1821; constable at Parramatta, later Port Macquarie

1822 Apr 28 - Asking to be removed from his present situation as he was a peace officer in Ireland and some of the men arrested were with him and he was in fear for his life (Reel 6055; 4/1760 p.48)

1822 Jun 6 - Appointed as a constable at Parramatta (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.63)

1822 Jul 8 - On return of proceedings of the Bench of Magistrates, Parramatta (Fiche 3297; X643 p.19)

1822 Jul 15 - Recommended for reward for apprehension of George Barke (Reel 6053; 4/1756 p.44)

1822 Aug 1 - Rewarded for apprehension of bushrangers (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.90)

1822 Dec 18 - Re forwarding D Tennant to Prisoner’s Barracks (Reel 6054; 4/1759 p.37a)

1823 Jan 14,15 - Sentenced to Port Macquarie. Petition that his wife Mary be allowed to proceed to Port Macquarie (Reel 6069; 4/1817 pp.9-9b)

1823 Jan 16 - On lists of prisoners transported to Port Macquarie per “Sally” (Reel 6019; 4/3864 pp.28, 382-3)

1823 Mar 17 - Re fining of Sarah Faulkner for selling spirits without licence (Reel 6058; 4/1770 pp.173-173a)

1823 c.Apr - On return of convict absentees from Emu Plains apprehended and sentenced to Port Macquarie from 1 Apr 1822 to 31 Mar 1823 (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.141)

1823 Apr 1 - Petition to have Mary Anne Usher, aged six, sent to Port Macquarie (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.11). Reply, 1 May (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.230)

1823 May 7 - Dismissed as constable at Parramatta (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.165)

1823 May 29 - Re custody of a child at the Female Orphan School (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.16)

1823 Nov 11 - Of Port Macquarie. Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3236; 4/1870 p.55)

1824 c.Feb - Claimed by Philip Hughes as ready to come forward on oath to prove the sentence passed on him (Reel 6065; 4/1799 pp.129-31)

1824 Feb 8 - Petition of Philip Hughes; Rush a witness that his sentence was seven years (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.34)

1824 Feb 9 - Of Port Macquarie; husband of Mary Rush. Petition to be allowed to return to Sydney or the Derwent (Fiche 3242; 4/1872 p.97). Reply, 19 Feb (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.365)

The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827
GOVERNMENT NOTICE.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.-
Peter Rush, Lord Sidmouth (2), from the 7th inst.
The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827

Maureen Withey on 18th July, 2019 wrote of John Richardson:

RICHARDSON, John. Per “Henry”, 1823

1823 Aug 29 - On list of prisoners landed from the “Henry” and forwarded to Liverpool for distribution (Reel 6011; 4/3509 p.135)

1824 Nov 20 - On list of convicts maintained by John Wood (Fiche 3117; 4/1840A No.1074 p.357)

1825 Apr 28 - On list of convicts employed by John Wood (Fiche 3145; 4/1843A No.550 p.565)

1825 Apr 15 - Convict in the service of John Wood of Chipping at the last two musters (Reel 6014; 4/3514 p.85)
Colonial Secretary Index

GOVERNMENT NOTICE.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.-
Penrith.- John Richardson,, per Henry (1), holding a Ticket of Leave, to be Constable, on the Bathurst Road.

The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827

Maureen Withey on 18th July, 2019 wrote of William Clayton:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.-
Upper District’s Hunter’s River - William Clayton, per England, to be Scourger.
The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827

The job of a Scourger was to wield the whip over anybody sentenced to be whipped.

Maureen Withey on 18th July, 2019 wrote of John Shaw Strange:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE. COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.
-Bathurst.-John Shaw Strange, per Guildford, and Michael Pearson, per Isabella to be Constables.
The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827

D Wong on 17th July, 2019 wrote of John Stewart:

John Stewart was 18 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Antrim County.

D Wong on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Terence Connell:

Terence Connell was listed as 50 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Meath.

29/12/1827: TOL
Indent on Ancestry is unreadable - this is from his TOL 1827:
No Offence recorded.
5’2” tall, dark complexion, brown hair, blue eyes, small scar on the left cheek, listed as a labourer.
Native Place: Caush of Old Castle.

17/12/1828: COF
25/5/1839: COF renewed.

No death found on the NSW BDM.

Stephen Stuart on 17th July, 2019 wrote of John Stewart:

Co. Antrim.
Absent from employment, 1824, 1825.
Certificate of Freedom, Oct 1829.

D Wong on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Nicholas Carr:

Nicholas Carr was listed as 25 years old on arrival.

Born: Great Harwood.

Transported for ‘Stealing 7 pieces of Calico.

Occupation: Cotton Printer.

Nicholas was 5’7¾” tall, ruddy complexion, light brown hair, reddish brown whiskers, grey eyes, left eyelid droops, large scar on left shin, brown mole near the left ear, single.

Father and Mother at Great Harwood, a tailor, Abraham Carr.

“I was last working as a Weaver for Elphraim Manning Wife & 2 children”.

1830 Muster: Field Police.

1832-33 Musters: Public Works.

16/4/1835: Free by Servitude.

26/11/1836: Permission to marry Mary Worthington (Arab).
No marriage registered.

13/12/1836: Passenger Launceston to Port Phillip per ‘Henry’.

8/8/1837: Permission to marry Julia Maria Cramp (Arab).
No marriage registered.

Stephen Stuart on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Terence Connell:

Certificate of Freedom, 1828

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of John Hartley:

John Hartley was a constable, but was dimissed.

Government Notice.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, 19th DECEMBER, 1826.
HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony:
At Myrtle Creek. - Joseph West, per Ship Coromandel (2) free, to be a Constable in the
Room of James Hartley, per Ship Indefatigable, dismissed.
Sydney Gazette 20 Dec 1826

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of John Evans:

HOBART TOWN. ABSTRACT OF SATURDAY’S GAZETTE

Appointments. To the Field Police:
John Evans, Georgiana.
The Cornwall Press, Tues 26 May 1829

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Thomas Kennedy:

HOBART TOWN. ABSTRACT OF SATURDAY’S GAZETTE

Appointments. To be constables:
Thomas Kennedy, Georgiana.
The Cornwall Press, Tues 26 May 1829

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Nicholas Carr:

HOBART TOWN. ABSTRACT OF SATURDAY’S GAZETTE

Appointments. To be constables:
Nicholas Carr, Georgiana.
The Cornwall Press, Tues 26 May 1829

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Thomas Jenkins:

HOBART TOWN. ABSTRACT OF SATURDAY’S GAZETTE

Appointments. To be constables:
Thomas Jenkins, Georgiana.
The Cornwall Press, Tues 26 May 1829

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Andrew Lennon:

The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827
GOVERNMENT NOTICE.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.-
DISMISSED.
Andrew Lennon, per Guildford (3), on the 14th ditto, gross Neglect of Duty.

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of James Lally:

James Lally’s police career did not last long.

The Monitor, Sydney, Tues 12 Jun 1827 reports:
GOVERNMENT NOTICE.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’s OFFICE, MAY 31st, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the Governor has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony, viz.-
DISMISSED.
James Lalley, per Earl St. Vincent, on the 10th ult. For Drunkenness.

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of John Ambrose:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
Colonial Secretary’s Office, March 5th, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony :
Sydney - To be Constables:... Joseph Gazzard, Larkens, and John Ambrose, Hadlow (2), from 10th Feb. 1827;
Sydney Gazette, 8 Mar 1827

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of James Tobin:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
Colonial Secretary’s Office, March 5th, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony :
Sydney - To be Constables:... James Tobin, Baring (1), from 14th Feb. 1827.
Sydney Gazette, 8 Mar 1827

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Joseph Gazzard:

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
Colonial Secretary’s Office, March 5th, 1827.
HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to approve of the following Alterations in the Police of the Colony :
Sydney - To be Constables:... Joseph Gazzard, Larkens, and John Ambrose, Hadlow (2), from 10th Feb. 1827;...
Sydney Gazette, 8 Mar 1827

Maureen Withey on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Peter Riley:

RILEY, Peter. Per “Isabella”, 1823

1824 Jan 19, Apr 22 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3291; 4/4570D p.107)

1824 Jul - On monthly return of prisoners punished at Newcastle (Reel 6023; 4/1718 p.188a)

1824 Jul 21 - Assigned to G J Frankland of Parramatta (Fiche 3088; 4/1837A No.354 p.381)

1824 Aug 13 - Convict servant of Mr G J Frankland. To be victualled from the Store at Newcastle for six months; listed as Reiley (Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.189)

Government Notice.
COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, MARCH 10, 1826.
THE Governor has been pleased to approve
of the Appointment of Peter Riley and Michael Heally, both by the Ship Isabella, to be Con
stables in the Town of Newcastle and Patrick’s
Plains respectively, vice Hogan and Thompson,
removed for Neglect of Duty, and improper Con-
duct. Appointment to bear Date the 2nd Instant.
By His Excellency’s Command,
ALEXANDER McLEAY.
Sydney Gazette 15 Mar 1826

Nell Murphy on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Benjamin Bright:

Benjamin BRIGHT was convicted at Cornwall, England on 24 March 1832 for robbery. Life Sentence. Gaol report: Had been previously convicted and served time in gaol. Hulk report: “good”.  Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship “Circassian” arriving 16 Feb 1833. “orderly” onboard ship.

Single man; aged 34 yrs; a boatman.

Colony of VDL:
Assigned to work service.  Several notations of misconduct on record.

10 Feb 1858: Death of Benjamin Bright, at Morven (now named Evandale, in the north of the Colony/State).  Disease of the heart.  Aged 64 yrs.  (ref. 35/1/27 no. 658)

N.B. There is another convict Benjamin Bright, transported in 1852.

Nell Murphy on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Benjamin Bright:

Benjamin BRIGHT was convicted at Hertford, England on 3 Jan 1848 for stealing a sheep. Previously convicted for poaching.  10 yr transportation sentence. Gaol report: “very good”.  Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Pestonjee Bomanjee’ arriving 31 July 1852.

Married man, children; aged 57yrs; shepherd & farm labourer; 5’4” height; Church of England; not literate; dark complexion; black/grey hair; sandy whiskers; dark eyes.
Native place of birth: Burley, England. (ref. as recorded on convict record)
Wife: Mary (ref. as recorded on convict record)
Brothers: William, Henry & Joseph
Sisters: Martha & Molly (or Milly(

Colony of VDL:
Granted Pass Holder status on arrival, 1852.
Probation period 2yrs, less 6 mths.
27 Sept 1853: Ticket of Leave granted.
17 Feb 1854: at Pontville - absent without leave, neglect of duty & drunk. 1 week solitary confinement.
14 Aug 1855: Conditional Pardon approved.
4 Jan 1858: Free Certificate issued.

18 Sept 1861: Death of Benjamin Bright, born Hereford, Engand, at the Govt. Hospital, Hobart. Cause - senilis.  Age 60 yrs.  (ref. 35/1/6 no. 2993)

(N.B. There is another Benjamin Bright, a convict in the Colony, but transported 20 yrs prior & from Cornwall.)

D Wong on 17th July, 2019 wrote of James Lyons:

James Lyons was 25 years old on arrival.

James was a Whiteboy Rebel.
James was involved with the Irish Rebellion of 1798 which was an uprising against British rule in Ireland.
Occupation: Police constable/labourer.
Longford Militia.

James was 5’8½” tall, dark ruddy complexion, silvery grey hair, hazel eyes.

Jan. 1818: CP. An Absolute Pardon is also listed in 1818.

1828 Census: Constable, Rev. J.J. Therry, Hyde Park.

Robyn Everist on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Peggy Crummer:

Information Courtesy of Female Convicts Research Centre - Keith Searson

THE EXECUTION OF SAMUEL CRUMMER
The extreme sentence of the law was carried into effect on Friday last sat Lifford , on Samuel Crummer who had been found guilty at the late assizes for the county of Donegal, of the murder of his father, near, Ardara, in that county.  His wife Peggy Crummer had also been convicted together with him, of the same offence, but the prerogative of mercy was exercised in her favour by the Lord Lieutenant, and her punishment commuted to transportation for life.  The evidence against both was circumstantial, but it was so conclusive that a most intelligent Jury returned the verdict without hesitation, and the wretched parricide made no protestation of his innocence upon his conviction.  Since then his demeanour has been that of a solid, illiterate man, who appeared to be quite insensible to the awful situation in which he was placed; but he has recently been heard to declare that his wife could prove that he was innocent, and that some members of her family were the perpetrators of the horrible and barbarous murder for which he was doomed to suffer. No sympathy was manifested for him, so fully persuaded were his neighbours and the public at large that he had committed the crime; and the circumstance of his intended execution excited so slight a sensation, although fourteen or fifteen years have elapsed since a similar event took place in the county of Donegal, that not more than three or four hundred persons were assembled at 1`1 o’clock, the hour at which it was expected to occur, and the entire concourse present at twelve o’clock did not exceed a thousand persons, a large proportion of them being boys, and ( we are happy to say, for the honour of the sex) very few females.
At twenty minutes before twelve, a strong party of constabulary, and sixty men of the 38th depot, were marched to the open space in front of Lifford Gaol, forming a semicircle, to prevent the crowd from approaching the building, and the fatal rope was seen attached to the metal bar above the drop.  As the Sub Sheriff had been instructed not to admit strangers to the prison, we cannot describe the particulars of what happened within its precincts, but we learned subsequently that Crummer partook of breakfast with an apparent appetite, at 11 o’clock, and that he exhibited no trepidation as the time drew nigh for his execution.  While the hangman was putting a large white garment over his ordinary dress and pinioning his arms, he repeated loud “ Lord have mercy on my soul” and before he was conducted to the scaffold he shook hands with the sheriff and officers of the prison, to whom he returned thanks for their conduct towards him during his incarceration.
At 12 o’clock precisely he was led out on the drop in front of the gaol, stepping with a cautious but firm tread on the iron grating.  A thrill of horror ran through the multitude, a murmur, not for pity but of awe was heard as he appeared.  It was a spectacle that might will appal the stoutest heart, to behold a man of colossal proportions, in full health and vigour, and who had scarcely yet arrived at the meridian of life, and to know that in another minute or two he would be launched into eternity. He was six feet two in height and but thirty two years of age, although an imprisonment of more than twelve months, and the ghostly habiliments he wore, made him look several years older.  But if anything could heighten the awfulness of the scene, it was the statement he made on the occasion.  The executioner having adjusted the rope, the culprit proceeded to address the crowd in a load voice,m and in a firm and collected manner – “Gentlemen and ladies,” said the wretched man, “I am going to inform you that I am about to die, and I wish to tell you that I am innocent, and that I never lifted hand or foot to my poor father, nor would I do it, but——————————, of Ardara, swore my life away for a little money in these hard times.  I leave my blessing to my children and all my friends, and I forgive all as I hope to get forgiveness myself.”  We were unable to catch the name of the individual to whom he alluded as having sworn away his life, owing to the screams of a female of weak intellect in a distant part of the crowd, who cried and gesticulated violently while the prisoner was speaking.  The wretched man repeated some of the foregoing observations two or three times, as if he had been endeavouring to express something which he had committed to memory, or in which he had been previously instructed, and not the sentiments that occurred to him at the moment.  The executioner, who was brought from Dublin for the purpose, then drew the white cap over his face, when he remonstrated, and, turning towards the door, through which he had walked to the drop, he asked to see the Governor of the Gaol.  The Roman Catholic priests who attend to prepare him for death, the Rev. Mr McGeoghegan, were standing at the door and the latter addressed some words to him in Irish, when Mr Fenton, the Governor, told him that it was usual to have the face covered, the Priests desired him to be resigned, and one of them patted him repeatedly on the shoulder.  Crummer then stood erect on the platform, with his front toward the street and after a few seconds, which seemed to be passed in prayer, the bolt was drawn, and almost instantaneously life appeared to have left him.  There was one convulsive movement of his arms after he fell, but it was only a moment, and then he hung motionless.  One of the Policemen on duty was so much affected at the dreadful spectacle that he was led away in an almost fainting state.  After the body had been suspended for three quarters of an hour, it was lowered and deposited in a coffin by the hangman, and immediately afterwards it was interred within the precincts of the prison.
The wretched man was asked on Thursday whether he wished to see his wife, but he replied that he did not, remarking that she had been a bad wife for him.  Crummer, it will be recollected, was in his earlier years nominally a Protestant, but he contracted a marriage in opposition to his father’s wish with his partner in guilt, who was a Roman Catholic, and when doing so had to conform to the religion she professed.  The old man continued to live with them, but he threatened that he would not leave them his farm on his demise, and in consequence they quarrelled among themselves; and it has been stated that Peggy Crummer beat her father-in-law, and, in order to obtain possession of the few acres of land he held, it is believed that she and her husband perpetrated the murder. Little as was the compassion evinced for the man who forfeited his life yesterday on the scaffold, it is reported that still less is felt for his wife.  Al all events, the awful tragedy should teach two lessons, namely, the evil of ill-assorted marriages, and the danger and pernicious results of covetousness.  Mixed marriages have been the fruitful source of discord and crime in Ireland, yet we find the Romish clergy doing all they can to promote them, in order to gain proselytes to their religious system: and when they have gained them, instead of teaching their converts to look for salvation where alone it can be found, in the blood of the Divine Saviour, and to invoke his mediation who is the only mediator between God and man, their fill their minds with “strong delusion” instructing them to offer their prayers to fallible beings, and probably send them before the Sovereign Judge of all with “ a lie in their right hand”.  How rarely do we hear of a culprit who has been under the guidance of a Romish priest publicly acknowledging his guilt at the hour of death, and though not a shadow of doubt can be entertained that he wither perpetrated the offence for which he is to suffer, or was accessory to it, yet he passes into eternity at peace with himself, as if it mattered not whether be spoke truth or falsehood at that awful crisis, and imputing in his dying moments, to those who are charged with executing the behests of the law, the crime of judicial murder.
(Taken from Tyrone Constitution 7 May 1847)

D Wong on 17th July, 2019 wrote of Robert Purcell:

Robert Purcell was listed as 20 years old on arrival.
Irish Convicts to NSW list him as 26.

Native Place: Kilkenny.

Robert was 5’4” tall, fair complexion, light brown hair, blue eyes.

21/4/1826: Permission to marry Margaret Means (Almorah) - Robert listed as 28 and on bond, Margaret 22 and on bond.

1826: Married Margaret Mayne at St. Mary’s, Sydney.
Children:
1826: John d 1888 Taralga.
1828: Catherine
1831: Mary A d 1899
1833: Robert d 1911

1828 Census: Living at Hunters Hill, NSW.
Purcell, Robert, 33, free by servitude, Hadlow, 1800, 7 years, Catholic, constable, Hunters Hill
Purcell, Margaret, 23, free by servitude, Almorah, 1800, 7 years, Catholic
Purcell, John, 2, born in the colony
Purcell, Catherine, 1, born in the colony
Purcell, Mary Anne, 7, born in the colony.

15/7/1872: Robert Purcell died at Taralga, Southern Tablelands, NSW., death registered at Goulburn, NSW. Age 77 and buried at the Stonequarry Cemetery, with Margaret.

Margaret died 1889 at Taralga, Southern Tablelands, NSW.
Margaret is listed as Mayne/Means/Meary/Mears/Maine - she arrived per Almorah 1824.

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