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Recent Submissions

D Wong on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Catherine Neale:

Old Bailey:
CATHERINE NEALE.
Theft: theft from a specified place.
15th August 1836
Verdict Guilty > unknown
Sentence Transportation

CATHERINE NEALE was indicted for stealing, on the 13th of July, 1 shift, value 1s., the goods of Norah Shea: 2 caps, value 6s., the goods of Mary Mack: 1 bonnet, value 6s.; 1 gown, value 7s.; 3 handkerchiefs, value 4s.; 1 waist-ribbon, value 6d.; the goods of Ellen Carty: 8 yards of printed cotton, value 8s.; 1 apron, value 10d.; the goods of Mary Connell: 1 gown, value 6d.; 1 petticoat, value 1s.; 1 pair of stockings, value 2s.; 1 pair of gloves, value 6d.; and 1 cap, value 6d.; the goods of Ellen Rowan.

NORAH SHEA. I lost my shift from Mr. Biggs, a market-gardener, at Barnet—I had left it on line, over my bed—I slept in a barn there (I came over from Ireland two years ago) the prisoner worked there about three months—I found the shift on her person—I never lent it to her.

MARY MACK. I work for Mr. Biggs, and sleep in the same place—I missed two caps—the policeman has them—these are mine.

ELLEN CARTY. I worked for Mr. Biggs three or four years—I slept in the same barn—I lost a bonnet, a gown, three handkerchiefs, and a waistribbon—these are mine.

MARY CONNELL. I worked for Mr. Biggs, and slept in the barn—I lost a gown-piece and apron—these are them—I never lent them to the prisoner—I only had this gown-piece from about one o’clock on Tuesday till the Wednesday night, when I lost it.

ELLEN ROWAN. I worked in the same place. I missed a gown, a petticoat, cap, and gloves—these are them—I kept them in the barn over my bed on a line—I never lent them to the prisoner.

MARGARET KIRWAN. I live on Ealing-common, near the Uxbridge-road, and keep a house to accommodate travellers. I have no sign up—the prisoner came there on Wednesday night, and brought this property—the policeman took her on the Sunday morning.

JOHN PASCOE (police-sergeant I 19.) I found some of this property of Kirwan’s some on the prisoner’s person, and I found a duplicate of some of it on her.

JOHN ALDOUS. I am a pawnbroker at Hammersmith. This gown and gown-piece were pawned at my house—I don’t know by whom, but this duplicate was given for it.

Prisoner. I asked to borrow a gown and handkerchief—I was going to see a friend—we were always in the habit of lending to each other any thing we had.

GUILTY. Aged 22.— Transported for Seven Years.

Catherine Neale was 23 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Cork.

Catherine could read, was Rom. Catholic, single, 5’1¼” tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair, grey eyes, broad featured, two warts back of third finger of right hand, another ball of right thumb.

C1838: (no exact date given) Permission to marry William Metcalf/e (Katherine Stewart Forbes 1830) - she was 24 and on Bond - William Metcalfe** was 32 and had TOL.

12/10/1838: Married at Church of England, St Saviours, Goulburn.
Children:
20/9/1839: William at Grampian Hills, Goulburn.
18/11/1840: Charles (listed as Metcraft) all born Grampian Hills.

21/11/1845: COF

D Wong on 21st April, 2019 wrote of William Metcalf:

William Metcalf was 24 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Kent.

William was literate, single, 5’2½” tall, ruddy complexion, blue eyes, dark brown hair, no body marks.

Assigned to James McFarlane, Argyle, NSW.

23/2/1837: TOL.
Prisoner’s No. 30/245
Allowed to remain in the District of Goulburn.

C1838: (no exact date given) Permission to marry Catherine Neale (Sarah and Elizabeth) - she was 24 and on Bond - William Metcalfe** was 32 and had TOL.

12/10/1838: Married at Church of England, St Saviours, Goulburn.
Children:
20/9/1839: William at Grampian Hills, Goulburn.
18/11/1840: Charles (listed as Metcraft) all born Grampian Hills.

26/8/1841: TOL Passport, Goulburn Bench.

14/10/1843: COF

Family websites have William dying at Tumbarumba, NSW.  Also the surname may have changed over the years to Metcraft.

Greg Petersen on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Benjamin Oadham:

1850 28th November, Convicted for stealing 2 sacks of potatoes and provisions from Mr. Denison at Newbury.Single. Surgeons report, Good.

1855 certificate of freedom for Benjamin Vadham/ Qadham/ Gadham
This is to certify that on Examination of the Assignment List it appears that Benjamin Vadham who was tried at Newbury 30 June 1848 and who arrived at Hobart Town in the Ship Rodney 3 in the year 1850 , under a sentence of Transportation for seven years and whose description is hereunto annexed, hath duly served the period for which he had been transported, and is henceforth restored to FREEDOM GIVEN under my hand at the Comptroller Generals Office Hobart Town

Published in the Hobart Town Gazette

this Third day of August in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and fifty five

By command of the Governor \signed by who?/

Deputy Comptroller General
(back of pass)

Description of the said BENJAMIN VADHAM

TRADE shoemaker

NATIVE PLACE Newbury

HEIGHT WITHOUT SHOES 5 feet 6

AGE 46

COMPLEXION fair

HEAD large

HAIR brown

WHISKERS reddish

VISAGE oval

FOREHEAD high

EYEBROWS dark brown

EYES blue

NOSE medium

MOUTH do

CHIN do

REMARKS Hair mole on right shoulder face pock pitted partly bald

J Burnett signed

Memorandum

should this certificate of freedom be lost, mislaid, or disfigured no duplicate or new certificate will on any account be granted by the Government.

J Burnett

Greg Petersen on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Butler:

The voluntary statement of Thomas Butler who saith I was born at Tulla in the county of Carlow Ireland. My father was a farmer, I left my Father’s house in 1812 I was then about twenty years of age I went to Dublin and enlisted for a soldier in the 25th light dragoons I remained in the Regiment for a year and a half and deserted from it in Maidstone in Kent two of my comrades deserted with me and on our road to Liverpool being without money we stopped a Mr John Ridgeway on the High Road near Stoney Stratford on an evening in September 1813 and robbed him of between nine and ten pounds in money, we took nothing else from his person we did not ill use him, I held his horse whilst the other men took the money from him which he gave up readily and then rode towards London, we proceeded along the Liverpool road to Daventry, we were in Regimentals when we committed the robbery, but had no arms we bought some coloured cloths at Lancaster/Towcester? and left our fatigue dresses there, the next morning we were taken in Daventry examined the same day by some Magistrates at Stoney Stratford and committed to Aylesbury Gaol and tried on the ninth of March 1814 before Sir Vicary Gibbs and cast for Death, I was transported to New South Wales in the Indefatigable and arrived in Sydney in April 1815 I was first assigned to Mrs Reiby and remained in her service nearly six years when I was returned to the service of the Crown I remained in the Government Boats about twelve months when I was sentenced to be sent to Port Macquarie for heaving a stolen watch in my possession belonging to

p477

Mr Robert Cooper which I had bought when I was intoxicated and to receive a Corporal punishment of a hundred lashes, I was to have remained at Port Macquarie the reminder of my sentence but was taken out of the vessel at Newcastle by the then Commandent Colonel Morrisset who had my irons knocked off and kelp me as one of the crew of his Barge, I went there in February 1822 and remained there and so employed until the latter end of 1826 and was then assigned to Captain Levingstone of the Lord Liverpool Cutter who took me to Sydney and remained with him until the latter end of July 1827 I was employed by my master in assisting to fit out the cutter Currency Lass and in the month of July 1827 I concealed myself on board that vessel and arrived on board her at Launceston on the twelfth of August at the wharf the Captain
did not knows I was on board or that I landed from her. I went over to Hobart Town where I engaged myself to a man named Bernard Fox a carrier and went with him to Mr John McLeods at Campbell Town, I was employed to protect the Goods on the road, I engaged with Mr McLeod and remained there ten months and was chiefly employed salting beef and taking it to the Commissariat Store in Launceston, after I left Mr McLeods I went to live with Mr Morrisy at Bagdad and hoid? with him as cook and waiter a month and then went to the Ship Inn in Hobart Town where I resided in the capacity of Waiter a fortnight and then came straight to Launceston and the next day I went on Board the Caroline cutter to enquire where she was bound to, Laughton White had a boat alongside and was

p479

shipping potatoes on board I told him I was a shoemaker and was in debt and wanted to stop ion some secret place for a little while, he took me to Captain Paines farm on the right bank of the Tamar that night, the next morning he called me a little way from the House and asked me to tell him the truth whether I was a free man or a prisoner he said tell me the truth if you are a prisoner I will endeavour to protect you as well as if you are a free man, you can go to my other farm on the opposite side of the River where you can hide privately, I told him I was a prisoner and every thing that had happened to me since I left Sydney, I passed myself by the name of Dennis Redman in Van Diemen’s Land until I gave myself up to the Police in Launceston.

I returned to Launceston for the purpose of getting out of the Colony. I have not committed any other offence in Ireland England or these colonies besides those I have stated nor in another other part of the world.

/signed/ Thomas Butler

BUTLER, Thomas. Per “Indefatigable”, 1815

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of William Garreway Vizard:

Wm. Garraway Vizard , has been this week committed to the Old Bridewell, Devizes, charged with stealing a bundle of wearing apparel, a pair of stockings, and other articles, from the dwelling-house of Charles Porter of Malmesbury. Vizard was one of the most active rioters at the House of Correction, near this town, a short time since, where he was then undergoing a sentence of 18 months imprisonment, for a felony. After this he was convicted of stealing some blanketting belonging to the prison, with which he made himself some waistcoats,  and was transferred to the Old Bridewell for further term of three months. He was finally discharged at the last Sessions.
Devizes Gazette, 30 Oct 1823

The following prisoners, in addition to those mentioned in our last, were convicted and sentenced as under:  Wm. Vizard, for stealing apparel, etc, the property of C. Porter of Malmesbury; and… were sentenced to 7 years transportation. Devizes Gazette, 22 Jan 1824.

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of John Press:

John Press and Wm Kettley, of Trowbridge, charged with having on the night of the 7th inst., in company with two other persons, in that parish, assaulted John Millard, of Westbury, and forcibly took from his person a bundle, containing a gown, a cap, and other articles.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 Aug 1822

John Press, Wm. Kettley, and Samuel Napper, (three young boys), for robbing John Millard, of a bundle and a hat, in the night, on the highway in the parish of Trowbridge. - ...
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 10 Mar 1823

Transportation for 7 years: .. John Press, William Kettley and Daniel Napper, for grand larceny. Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 17 Mar 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Brooks:

The following were convicted and sentenced as under: Death- Richard Wait, for maliciously cutting down and destroying trees; John Bugden, Jas. Rooke, George Quinton, Thomas Torrance, James Hulbert, John Townsend, James Woodman, Thomas Brooks, John Butcher, and William Edmonds, for burglary; Moses Ball, Wm. Beamont, William and Joseph Crabb for stealing from the person; Job Drew and John Oak, jun. for housebreaking; Stephen May, for stealing above the value of ? in a dwelling-house; Francis Willis and Williams, for horse-stealing; John Bell for sheep-stealing. (all the above prisoners have been reprieved.  Transportation for 7 years: . ..
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Mar 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Francis Willis:

The following felons, eight in number, capitally convicted at our assizes, were on Monday last, removed from Gaol to the convict hulk lying off Gosport: George Quinton, James Rook, John Butcher, Wm. Edmonds, Thos. Brooks, and James Woodman, for burglary: Francis Willis, for horse-stealing; and Richard Waite, for destroying trees. They are to be transported.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 May 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Francis Willis:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol: Francis Willis and Geo. Williams, charged with stealing two horses, the property of George Martin and James Hoskins, of the parish of St George, in the county of Gloucester, …
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 16 Sept 1822

Francis Willis and Geo. Williams, for stealing two horses, the property of George Martin and James Hoskins, of the parish of St George, Gloucester, the awful sentence of death was passed on them, but they were reprieved. Devizes Gazette, 13 Mar 1823

D Wong on 21st April, 2019 wrote of James Juba:

6/1/1844 Leicestershire Mercury Leicestershire, England:

LEICESTER POLICE COURTS
GEORGE WESTON, was charged with having feloniously entered the dwelling house of Mr. Drayton, Castle View, on the 19th November last, and stolen therein a gold watch, five brooches, and a number of other articles, his property.  Mr. Mellor appeared for the prosecution.
The servant girl of the prosecutor went out about 7 o’clock on the evening in question (Sunday), and when she returned, in about an hour, saw a light in the house and the front door was fastened inside.  She then went for the police.
Police Constabel Ward went to the house on receiving information and found it had been ransacked.
Police Constable Haynes met the prisoner with Juba in the lane leading to Flower’s mill shortly before 8 on the night in question.  He search Weston and found a gold watch and a number of brooches, &c., and also the key of Mr. Drayton’s back door.  He now produced the articles, which Mrs. Drayton identified. Prisoner said he met with Juba on the West Bridge, and they went together down the lane. Juba picked up a handkerchief containing all these articles. Guilty.

JAMES JUBA, 17, pleaded guilty to the same indictment. They were severally sentenced to ten years’ transportation.

George Weston was also on board the ‘London’.

James Juba was 19 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Leicestershire.

Occupation: Brewer/Malster.

James was 5’7½” tall, sallow complexion, brown hair, no whiskers, blue eyes, deeply pockpitted, small scar on 2nd finger of right hand, scar on left hand, several small scars on 2 & 3 fingers left hand, protestant, single, illiterate.

Brothers: Alfred, Henry.
Sisters: Mary, Harriet—all at native place.

Served 15 months probation at Southport.

10/10/1845: Emerged from Gang.

9/4/1850: TOL

1850: Employed by Captain Moriarty.

23/6/1851: Fully committed for trial at Richmond for Sheep stealing.

21/7/1851 - Not Guilty.

13/1/1854: Certificate of Freedom - working for Himself.

29/1/1864 The Mercury, Hobart:
LARCENY.-James Juba and Susan White were charged on information by Detective Vickers, with having on the 20th day of January feloniously stolen a watch, the property of Thomas Chance.
Detective Vickers prayed for the discharge of the prisoners, as he had no evidence to offer.
Prisoners were discharged accordingly.

Roger Churm on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Peter Fagan:

Old Bailey Proceedings June 1831
The trial of Peter Fagan.

1360.PETER FAGAN was indicted for stealing.on the 27th of May,1 waistcoat,value 8s;2 shirts,value 5s;1 pair of stockings value 1s;1 pair of drawers value 18d;4 handkerchiefs value 2s 4d;1 hat cover value 6d;1 collar value 18d;1 tobacco box value 6d;1 stopper value 2d;3 pencil cases value 1s,the property of George Marvell,the younger;and 1 waiste value 3s 6d;1 pair of stockings value 1s;and 1 handkerchief value 6d the goods of George Marvell the elder.

GEORGE MARVELL,Jun I live with my father at Leicester.We were at the Three Tuns ,in Brook street,Holborn-this bundle was imprisoned our sleeping room,on a table we went to bed at half-past nine o’clock-I tried to lock the door,but it was not fast;any one might open it -I have seen the prisoner in the tao room in the course of that evening,and sat in traffic same box with him;my father got up about eight o’clock the next morning,and the bundle was gone-the door was shut.

FRANCIS SAREFIELD.I am an officer.on the night of the 27th of Mau I saw the prisoner crossing Charles street,Hatton garden;I followed him from there to Saffron hill,and from there to West street-he had a large bundle;I came up with him in West street,about two o’clock in the morning -I asked what he had in the bundle;he said his own property-I asked what it was,and he could not tell me-I took him to the station;I found a sovereign and a 5s piece in a purse in his fob-also a half a crown and some halfpence,and in the bundle was a soldiers discharge,which it seems he had purchased for 201.;some of these articles were wrapped round his body,and the results were in the bundle.

Cross examined Q. Did you tell a man gave it him to carry ? A. NO,he said it was his own-I was an officer then,but I am now dismissed;I was fatigued and not fit for duty,and the inspector thought me in liquor.

ANN LEWIS. I keep the public house,The prosecutor lodged there that night-I saw the prisoner come in about nine o’clock,and leave about twelve.

Cross examined Q. Did you see any bundle in his hand;I did not see any person go out with a bundle-my waiter let the prisoner out;I did not think he could have concealed the property about him.

GEORGE MARVELL ,Sen.This is my property and my sons-I went to bed to sleep.

Cross examined Q Where was this property? A. On the table in the room

Prisoners Defence.The officer took me there was a man and woman with me;I had seen them before,and the man said to me, “l have just left my mother,am going with this woman to Saffron hill"I went with them to a house of ill fame,and he told me to take care of this bundle,which I did -we came out together,and I was going to return the property to the man,when the officer came and said who’s was it;I said mine while I had it-d then took me,and the man and woman decamped;the officer mentioned the mans name,and I believe he knew him perfectly well-he stated at the office that he was a countryman of his.

FRANCIS SARESFIELD . There was another man,whom I had take before,and when I took this prisoner he escaped.

FRANCIS MILLER.I am a waiter at the house.I let the prisoner out-I held the candle while the door was opened;he had no bundle -he could not have such s bundle as this without my seeing it;I am positive he had no bulky appearance-our house is visited by hawkers and others

COURT.Q.What time did he come ? A. I cannot say-two persons went off just after him;they were the last three that went out.they went out before I closed the door;they went out together within in a minute or two -I did not rub them down; none of them had any bulky appearance - none of them had a bundle of this dimension,but the things might be decided;I looked at them all as they passed-I do not know whether the prisoner had been drinking with them;I have a tap room,parlour and all to attend to-it was about twelve o’clock when they went;it was not later -I can swear they did not go out in company.

GUILTY.Aged 22

Transported for Seven Years.

Robin Sharkey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Elizabeth Jackson:

CORRECTION - Son Samuel was NOT the miller to Mr Dixon at Darling Harbour and did NOT commit a theft in a bonded store in 1829 with a 3 year sentence. That person was a different Samuel “Arundell” who arrived as a convict in 1823 on convict transport ship “Princess Royal”.

Kath Mungeam on 21st April, 2019 wrote of James Juba:

Son of James Juba and Mary Boughton born in Leicester in 1823.  James concluded his sentence in 1854.  Last item found was for an Oyster Fishery Licence issued to James in the City of Hobart in march 1869.

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of George Quinton:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol: George Quinton and James Rooke, of Downton, labourers, charged with having, in the night of the 11th instant, burglariously broken into the house of the Rev. Thomas Lear, at Downton, and with having stolen divers goods, his property, ...
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Feb 1823

The following were convicted and sentenced as under: Death- … Jas. Rooke, George Quinton, …
for burglary; …(all the above prisoners have been reprieved.)
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Mar 1823

The following felons, eight in number, capitally convicted at our assizes, were on Monday last, removed from Gaol to the convict hulk lying off Gosport: George Quinton, James Rook, John Butcher, Wm. Edmonds, Thos. Brooks, and James Woodman, for burglary: Francis Willis, for horse-stealing; and Richard Waite, for destroying trees. They are to be transported.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 May 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of James Rooke:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol: George Quinton and James Rooke, of Downton, labourers, charged with having, in the night of the 11th instant, burglariously broken into the house of the Rev. Thomas Lear, at Downton, and with having stolen divers goods, his property, ...
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Feb 1823

The following were convicted and sentenced as under: Death- … Jas. Rooke, George Quinton, …
for burglary; …(all the above prisoners have been reprieved.)
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Mar 1823

The following felons, eight in number, capitally convicted at our assizes, were on Monday last, removed from Gaol to the convict hulk lying off Gosport: George Quinton, James Rook, John Butcher, Wm. Edmonds, Thos. Brooks, and James Woodman, for burglary: Francis Willis, for horse-stealing; and Richard Waite, for destroying trees. They are to be transported.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 May 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of William Edmonds:

Committed to Gaol: John Butcher and Wm. Edmonds, charged with having, on the night of the ? inst, burglariously broken into and entered the house of George Lewington at Fisherton Anger, and stolen therefrom two great coats, and other goods. … Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 27 Jan 1823

Convicted and sentenced as under: Death … John Butcher, and William Edmonds, for burglary;.. (all the above prisoners have been reprieved.)
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Mar 1823

The following felons, eight in number, capitally convicted at our assizes, were on Monday last, removed from Gaol to the convict hulk lying off Gosport: George Quinton, James Rook, John Butcher, Wm. Edmonds, Thos. Brooks, and James Woodman, for burglary: Francis Willis, for horse-stealing; and Richard Waite, for destroying trees. They are to be transported.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 May 1823

Maureen Withey on 21st April, 2019 wrote of John Butcher:

Committed to Gaol: John Butcher and Wm. Edmonds, charged with having, on the night of the ? inst, burglariously broken into and entered the house of George Lewington at Fisherton Anger, and stolen therefrom two great coats, and other goods. … Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 27 Jan 1823

Convicted and sentenced as under: Death … John Butcher, and William Edmonds, for burglary;.. (all the above prisoners have been reprieved.)
Salisbury and Winchester Journal,  17 Mar 1823

The following felons, eight in number, capitally convicted at our assizes, were on Monday last, removed from Gaol to the convict hulk lying off Gosport: George Quinton, James Rook, John Butcher, Wm. Edmonds, Thos. Brooks, and James Woodman, for burglary: Francis Willis, for horse-stealing; and Richard Waite, for destroying trees. They are to be transported.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 19 May 1823

Roger Churm on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Esther Ferguson:

Old Bailey Proceedings September 1814
Trial of Esther Ferguson
ESTHER FERGUSON and ESTHER DOBSON were indicted for feloniously stealing,on the 6th of September,thirteen 10.1.bank notes,five 5.1 bank notes,and fourteen 1.1 bank notes,the property o Abraham Broms.from his person.

ABRAHAM BROMS.I am a captain of a Swedish ship.

Q. On Tuesday,the 6th of September,had you received any bank notes-A.Yes,at Messrs.Fullers I received them,there were near two hundred pounds altogether;they were ten’s,gives,and one’s.I put the notes into my pocket-book when I received them,and my pocket -book into my breast pocket;I left the Exchange about five o’clock;as I was leaving the Exchange,Esther Ferguson met me;she asked me to go to her lodgings;I went with her,I forgot the name of the place;I went with her into a house,and when I came into the house,they locked the door,and put the key in their pocket.

Q. Was there any other person in the room at first - A. There was a little girl of twelve years old
The moment I saw the door locked,I was afraid;I wanted to go directly.Ferguson asked the little girl to go down,and ask the other lady to come up;Esther Dobson came and sat on my left knee;when she came up,she got a working my coal outside,so and to raise the pocket-book up the top of my pocket;then Ferguson came close and looked over my shoulder,took the pocket -book,and ran downstairs.While Ferguson was downstairs Dobson kept her arms around my neck.Ferguson came up star,and tried to put the pocket -book into my pic,it fell down;I picked it up and found all the notes were gone.Ferguson then took out the key,as said I might go if I pleased.After I picked up the pocket-book;I said to Ferguson,you have taken my money away;they told me I wrong,I said yes,one of us must be wrong;I shall go and find a constable.I saw a more of the name of Kippax;I asked his assistance.I took one,he took the other,to the office;we secured them both.

Q. Had you more money than what you received at the bankers -Yes.I had one hundred and ninety four pounds or two hundred and four pounds,I am not sure which.

Mr.Alley.Q.This was a aukward cruise that you had;how many notes did you go at the bankers.A.One hundred and sixty-seven notes,I cannot recollect what notes I had besides.

Q. Were you sober - A.Yes

Q. When the girl took your pocket-book,why did you not take it out of her hand -A. I was after there was some people below;I was afraid of being killed.

WILLIAM KIPPAX.I am a Greenwich pensioner .On Tue,the 6th of September,I was at my brothers house,in Church lane;there is an alley by the side of our house,I saw the Captain and Ferguson came down the street,about five o’clock,he had hold of Ferguson by the hand;I saw them again in about ten minutes afterwards;he was singing out for a constable.I went to the door immediately;he came up our steps with Ferguson in his hand;he said these girls had robbed him to a great amount.I saw Dobson,she had a key in her hand.I went for a constable;I could not get one.I told Dobson to come along with me;she threatened to knock me down.I said,come along to the magistrate I assisted in taking the prisoners to the office.I delivered them over to Dalton,the officer.

EBENEZER DALTON I am an officer The two prisoners were brought to Lambeth-street office by Kippax,and the prosecutor I searched them and found nothing on them.The prisoners gave me a key for me to go and search the house;I searched the house and found nothing.

WILLIAM BORER.I am a clerk at the house of Fuller and Co.

Q. On the 26th of September,did you pay Mr Broms any sum of money-A.I did one hundred and sixty pounds in ten’s,five’s.and one’s.

Ferguson’s Defence-When the gentleman came into the house.I never saw him with any money.

Dobson’s Defence The same.

FERGUSON.GUILTY.Aged 20

DOBSON.GUILTY.Aged 16

Transported for Life

First Middlesex jury before Mr Common Serjeant

Y

Roger Churm on 21st April, 2019 wrote of Esther Ferguson:

Old Bailey Proceedings September 1814
Trial of Esther Ferguson
ESTHER FERGUSON and ESTHER DOBSON were indicted for feloniously stealing,on the 6th of September,thirteen 10.1.bank notes,five 5.1 bank notes,and fourteen 1.1 bank notes,the property o Abraham Broms.from his person.

ABRAHAM BROMS.I am a captain of a Swedish ship.

Q. On Tuesday,the 6th of September,had you received any bank notes-A.Yes,at Messrs.Fullers I received them,there were near two hundred pounds altogether;they were ten’s,gives,and one’s.I put the notes into my pocket-book when I received them,and my pocket -book into my breast pocket;I left the Exchange about five o’clock;as I was leaving the Exchange,Esther Ferguson met me;she asked me to go to her lodgings;I went with her,I forgot the name of the place;I went with her into a house,and when I came into the house,they locked the door,and put the key in their pocket.

Q. Was there any other person in the room at first - A. There was a little girl of twelve years old
The moment I saw the door locked,I was afraid;I wanted to go directly.Ferguson asked the little girl to go down,and ask the other lady to come up;Esther Dobson came and sat on my left knee;when she came up,she got a working my coal outside,so and to raise the pocket-book up the top of my pocket;then Ferguson came close and looked over my shoulder,took the pocket -book,and ran downstairs.While Ferguson was downstairs Dobson kept her arms around my neck.Ferguson came up star,and tried to put the pocket -book into my pic,it fell down;I picked it up and found all the notes were gone.Ferguson then took out the key,as said I might go if I pleased.After I picked up the pocket-book;I said to Ferguson,you have taken my money away;they told me I wrong,I said yes,one of us must be wrong;I shall go and find a constable.I saw a more of the name of Kippax;I asked his assistance.I took one,he took the other,to the office;we secured them both.

Q. Had you more money than what you received at the bankers -Yes.I had one hundred and ninety four pounds or two hundred and four pounds,I am not sure which.

Mr.Alley.Q.This was a aukward cruise that you had;how many notes did you go at the bankers.A.One hundred and sixty-seven notes,I cannot recollect what notes I had besides.

Q. Were you sober - A.Yes

Q. When the girl took your pocket-book,why did you not take it out of her hand -A. I was after there was some people below;I was afraid of being killed.

WILLIAM KIPPAX.I am a Greenwich pensioner .On Tue,the 6th of September,I was at my brothers house,in Church lane;there is an alley by the side of our house,I saw the Captain and Ferguson came down the street,about five o’clock,he had hold of Ferguson by the hand;I saw them again in about ten minutes afterwards;he was singing out for a constable.I went to the door immediately;he came up our steps with Ferguson in his hand;he said these girls had robbed him to a great amount.I saw Dobson,she had a key in her hand.I went for a constable;I could not get one.I told Dobson to come along with me;she threatened to knock me down.I said,come along to the magistrate I assisted in taking the prisoners to the office.I delivered them over to Dalton,the officer.

EBENEZER DALTON I am an officer The two prisoners were brought to Lambeth-street office by Kippax,and the prosecutor I searched them and found nothing on them.The prisoners gave me a key for me to go and search the house;I searched the house and found nothing.

WILLIAM BORER.I am a clerk at the house of Fuller and Co.

Q. On the 26th of September,did you pay Mr Broms any sum of money-A.I did one hundred and sixty pounds in ten’s,five’s.and one’s.

Ferguson’s Defence-When the gentleman came into the house.I never saw him with any money.

Dobson’s Defence The same.

FERGUSON.GUILTY.Aged 20

DOBSON.GUILTY.Aged 16

Transported for Life

First Middlesex jury before Mr Common Serjeant

Y

Greg Petersen on 20th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Massey:

1831 19th March,Hobart Town Courier entry,
We regret to learn from the Launceston Advertiser, that the blacks in the neighbourhood of Ben Lomond have renewed their sanguinary attacks upon the stock-keepers and others in exposed situations. Two sawyers, named John Taylor and
Edward Sharpe, in the employment of Mr. Massey, had been attacked by them while at work, and Sharpe was wounded so severely that his life was despaired of. After which they attacked a hut in which was a Mrs. Cunningham and child, whom they wounded so severely that little hopes were entertained of their recovery.. Same article appeared in Van Dieman’s Land News (From the Hobart Town courier) Tuesday 19th April 1831 Page 3

“On the 29th February, .1831, “as two
sawyers were at work near Mr. Massey’s:
in the vicinity of Ben Lomond, they were
attacked by the natives. The blacks took
from the place some blankets ‘and a gun,
but the men-John Taylor arid Edward
Sharpe-escaped, though severely wounded
by spears and bruised by waddles.”

D Wong on 20th April, 2019 wrote of William Grahame:

William Graham/e was listed as 30 years old on arrival in VDL.
Native Place Westmeath County.

Transported for House Robbery - stealing meat.

William was 5’7½” tall, RC, married with 2 children, reads and writes a little, sallow complexion, dark brown hair, no whiskers, light brown eyes, stout made, under lip projects.

Mother: Katherine
Sister: Mary—at native place.

26/3/1851: Assigned to J. McConnor, Jerusulem.

15/6/1852: TOL

22/6/1852: Recommended for a CP.
7/2/1854: CP Approved.

22/1/1899: William died at Colebrook, registered at Richmond, Tasmania, aged 78, of old age.
Informant: William Graham, Son, Colebrook.
William Snr. listed as a farmer.

Source: http://foundersandsurvivors.org/pubsearch/convict/chain/ai27587

https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON33-1-101$init=CON33-1-101p95

Greg Petersen on 20th April, 2019 wrote of Edward Sharpe:

Hobart Town Courier - Sat 9th May 1829 page 2 - Certificate of Freedom - Edward Sharpe per Claudine Possibly Edward Sharpe per Claudine: From Hobart Town Courier of Saturday 19th March 1831 - Article telling of attack by Blacks on two men while at work, one of whom was an Edward Sharpe, both Sawyers, in the employ of a Mr Massey of Launceston. Edward Sharpe was wounded severely and his life was ‘despaired of’‘. Same article appeared in Van Dieman’s Land News (From the Hobart Town courier) Tuesday 19th April 1831 Page 3

Roger Churm on 20th April, 2019 wrote of John Purdie:

Old Bailey Proceedings September 1791
Trial of John Purdie

JOHN PURDIE,was indicted for stealing,on the 19th August last,nine copper halfpence,value 4 1 1/2d.the property of William Adam.

WILLIAM ADAM sworn

I live in Grafton street,the prisoner lived with me as a porter;on the 19th of August,having some reason to suspect him,I marked three shillings worth of half pence,I told him to take care of the shop while I went into the yard;when I returned I missed the nine halfpence,I sent for the constable who searched him and took him to the watch -house;I was not in the yard three minutes,he was not entrusted to pay or receive,never bought or sold goods;I missed goods several times before.

THOMAS DALTON,sworn

I found these halfpence on the prisoner

(the halpence produced and deposed by the
prosecutor)

Prosecutor Those halfpence that are here I marked twenty four by the letter of the alphabet and some by numbers,those which I found on the prisoner correspond with the nine missed.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY.

Transported for seven years.

Trial by the first Middlesex jury before Mr Justice Grose.

Lyn Hudson-Williamson on 20th April, 2019 wrote of Francis Willis:

“Guildford” arrived 5 March 1824 and assigned to Hamilton Hum on 31 March 1824

Roger Churm on 20th April, 2019 wrote of Alexander Edmonds:

Old Bailey Proceedings October 1817
ALEXANDER EDMONDS,VIOLENT THEFT,HIGHWAY ROBBERY.
29th October 1817

1463.Alexander Edmonds was indicted for feloniously assaulting Alice Timmins on the King’s Highway,on the 21st of October,and putting her in fear,and taking from her person,and against her will,four shirts,value 11 6s;three pairs of stockings,value 6s;three handkerchiefs,value 10s 6d;eight aprons,value 11s;two waistcoats,value 4s 6d;and four pair of shoes,value 4s,the goods of Thomas Timmins.

ALICE TIMMINS.I am the wife of Thomas Timmins.I am a laundress.On the 21st October,I was going from Sun street,home with a bundle;as I went along Sun street opposite a gateway I was stopped;I had my arm through the knots of the handkerchief -A person came to my elbow and gave a snatch at my bundle,but did not take it;he then came in front of me and snatched it,another person came and put his hand over my mouth,while the prisoner was taking it,so that I could not call out;he turned the corner,and the other man ran a;it was about half past seven o’clock;there was a gas light close to me -they got out of my sight.I am sure the prisoner is the man-I saw his face clearly;I saw him six days after,at Worship street,and picked him out from several others,immediately.

Prisoner.Q.Did you not see the officer bring me into the room-A.No.

MARY MAVEY.I am servant to Mr.Carey,who lives in Sun street;I gave the prosecutrix the bundle it contained the articles stated in the indictment.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG.JUN,I am an officer of Worship street;the prosecutrix came to the office about an hour after the robbery,and had a description of the man entered in our book.On the 27th October,I apprehended the prisoner,in consequence of that description;he denied the charge;the prosecutrix was introduced into the tap-room,and immediately picked him out.She did not see me bring him in.

Prisoners Defence.I can prove I was at a public house at the time.

THOMAS BODEL.I am pot boy at the Weavers Arms,Angel alley,Bishopsgate street;the prisoner used our house he came in at six o’clock that night as he usually did;it was last Tuesday week;I am certain that was the night-he had a pint of beer,a pipe of tobacco,and a glass of gin and pepper;he had the beer first-He staid there till after nine o’clock.

Q. What makes you sure - A.I am kept to wait in the tap-room- He was ill;my mistress asked him how he came to be so ill.

Q. When was you called upon first about it-A. Saturday morning-his wife enquired about it.

Cross examined by MR PLATT.Q. How do you know what o’clock it was-A.I looked at the clock in the tap-room sometimes my mistress gave him the gin and pepper.Perry was there also-He sat opposite the fire place;there were seven or eight people in the room.I am positive it was Tuesday night.

ALEXANDER PERRY.I work at Billingsgate.I know the prisoner-last Tuesday week I was at the Weavers Arms,at half-past six o’clock and stayed there till nine,the prisoner was there all the time;the prisoner came in a little before seven o’clock.

COURT.Q. Are you sure he was not there when you first came in-A.Yes;when he came in,he put his hand to his stomach and said it was bad;he had two -pennyworth of pillicotia made into pills;Bodel went out for it -he had nothing to drink-He swallowed the pills without any liquid.A young man applied to me to be a witness here.

Cross-examined.The prisoner came in about a quarter before seven ;there was no o’clock In the tap-room by which I could tell the time.I knew the tap-room well.

Q. Did not the landlady recommend him to have something for his pain - A.Not to my knowledge.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG,JUN,re-examined.The place where the robbery was committed,it is not more than two minutes walk from the Weavers Arms.

NOT GUILTY

London Jury,before Mr.Common Sergeant

The name fits the dates to not a common name If anyone has any thoughts please ammend.

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