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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

D Wong on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Old Bailey:
RICHARD MORTIMER, GEORGE MORTIMER.
Violent Theft: robbery.
12th May 1845
Verdict Guilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
Sentence Transportation; Imprisonment

RICHARD MORTIMER and GEORGE MORTIMER were indicted for a robbery on George Wright, on the 7th of May, putting him in fear, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 pair of boots, value 12s., the goods of John Collins; and that Richard Mortimer bad been before convicted of felony; to which
RICHARD MORTIMER pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE WRIGHT. I live in Boulevard-court, Strand, and am in the employ of Mr. John Collins. On the 7th of May, about nine o’clock at night, I was near Hyde Park, in Knightsbridge. I had a pair of boots of my master’s—I was asking a respectable young woman my way to Chelsea—the prisoners came up to me, and said they would show me—they walked me about for two hours, till they got to the Willow-walk, and then George Mortimer held me while Richard took the boots from me, and ran away—I then asked George Mortimer to show me the way home, and we had only just turned out of the fields when we met a policeman, and I gave him in charge—I did not know either of the prisoners before—I am ten years old—these are the boots.

JOHN FRYER (police-constable P 31.) Wright gave me George Mortimer in charge—he said, George did not take die boots from him, but one that was with him did, and George said it was his brother—I took Wright with me, and went to a house—I found Richard Mortimer sitting on the bed in the back kitchen, and these boots were under the bed where he sat.

(George Mortimer received a good character.)

G. MORTIMER— GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Richard Mortimer was 19 years old on arrival.
Native Place, Norwich, Norfolk.

Richard was 5’4¼” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, no whiskers, black eyes, literate, single, protestant, tattoos.

Father: George
Mother: Mary - Vauxhall road, London.
Brothers: George, Alfred, Charles.
Sisters: Ann, Maria.

5/7/1845: Employed by Edward A Edwards.

22/6/1852: TOL

14/12/1852: Permission to marry Bridget Moran, free.

20/12/1852: Married Bridget Moran at Hobart.
Children:
5/12/1853: Unnamed male.
2/9/1858: John Richard, registered at Campbell Town. - Mother listed as Bridget Maugham.
21/8/1860: Unnamed male, registered Launceston - father at Launceston, a brewer.
8/9/1862: Unnamed female, registered Launceston.  Father at Brisbane Street, a Cook.

9/2/1855: Misconduct in attemptin to obtain goods under false pretences - 6 months hard labour.

16/2/1855: TOL revoked.

6/3/1855: TOL
15/6/1855: Free Certificate.

26/9/1863 The Mercury, Hobart:
WRECK ON THE COAST.
The following notice was posted yesterday at the
Telegraph Office: -
REPORTED WRECK.
LAUNCESTON, Sept 25th, 9 am
Reported here that the schooner Creole has been wrecked near Waterhouse Island. The beach for miles is strewn with cattle, hay, &c. Oars, life buoy, bedding, and other articles with captain’s and ship’s name on have been found.
The above has been know among the inhabitants of the North Coast for the last three weeks, but has only been just reported.
In reference to the above, we find that the brigantine Creole, 131 tons, Captain Fluerty, cleared out at the Launceston customs for Dunedin on the 25th of August, and passed through Tamar Heads on the morning of the 29th August.
The following is a list of her passengers:
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. C. Townley and child, Miss Bain, Mrs. Green, Mr. Henry Clayton, Masters Clayton (2), Mrs. John Rattray and infant, Master Rattrays (2), Miss Rattray, W. Weymouth, Mr. James Dean.
Her crew composed seven men, and eight who were shipped as grooms, and their names were entered on the ships papers as follows:- Crew: Norman Clarke, John Cook, Richard Mortimer, Thomas Smith, William Wilson, Thomas Joyce, W. Dewar, Robert Thompson.
Grooms - Samuel Clewar, Frederick Gibbs, J. Lamont, Wm. Coleby, John Wilson, Thomas Green, and Audrew Stevenson. The Creole had, therefore, thirty-one souls on board, all of whom have, it is feared, perished.
*This is and edited version of a much longer article*.

26/12/1865: Bridget Mortimer, aged 34 married George Thomas Green, aged 41, at Launceston.
George was a widower and a boot maker.
Bridget was a widow.
Married in Mrs. Mortimer’s private house, Brisbane Street, Launceston.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of James Nangle:

“The Assizes of Kilkenny ended the 9th instant [August 1801], at which the following persons were tried before Baron George:
James Nangle, convicted of a felony at large, to be transported for seven years.”

Nangle made three attempts to sail to England - in 1811, 1812, and 1817, before he eventually managed to do so, being recorded in the 1825 Muster as “gone to England”. In the years between his 1801 sentence and his departure, the following is the record of him in NSW.

In 1806 Muster, in gaol at Parramatta

On the 29 December 1810, the American brig ‘Active’ came into Sydney Harbour under command of Capt Richardson, from the Isle of Bourbon (near the Ile de France), part of Mauritius, where it had left in November, bringing news of the surrender of that isle to the British.

James Nangle decided he would leave on this ship. First, he started tidying up his business. On the 5th January 1811 he advertised in the Sydney Gazette that he would sell the furniture, of little value, left in his house at Parramatta by William Ruffane about nine months earlier,  to pay the charges on the said furniture.
Then, on January 12 and January 19, 1811 he advertised his intention to leave the colony on “Active”, and requested, in the usual way, that any claims or demands on him be presented. However, further advertisements on January 26 of mens’ intentions to leave on ‘Active’ did not include James Nangle. The ship left on 5 February 1811.

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of John Browning:

Salisbury. Committed to Fisherton Gaol- John Browning, charged, on the oath of Margaret Dore, shopkeeper, of Stratton St Margaret, with having, on the 11th instant, disposed of and put away a forged £5 Bank of England note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank.  Wm. Lee, convicted at the late assizes of passing a forged Bank of England note, remains for execution tomorrow at Fisherton.
Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 20 Mar 1820

Salisbury.
Tthe following convicts from Gaol, were Wednesday last put on board the Leviathan hulk, in Portsmouth harbour, viz. ..John Browning…
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 25 Sept 1820

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Samuel (the Younger) Staples:

Salisbury. Committed to Fisherton Gaol: Samuel Staples, jun. of the parish of Box, sawyer, charged with having in the night of the 30th of Nov. last (together with Thomas York, Joseph Dowley, and others) broken open the dwellinghouse of Hester Smith, in the said parish, and stolen from thence a sack, tin canister containing tea, several shawls, three shrowds, and many other articles, of the value of £100 and upwards.
Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 10 Jan 1820

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas York:

Thomas York, Joseph Dowley and Samuel Staples jun., for burglariously breaking into and robbing divers articles, the dwelling house of Hester Smith, at Box.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 6 Mar 1820

Conditional pardon, 9 Sep 1830, Free pardon,  16 Dec 1838
Stated wife at Bradford, Wilts.
Source: Tasmanian record CON31-1-45 Image 353

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Samuel (the Younger) Staples:

Thomas York, Joseph Dowley and Samuel Staples jun., for burglariously breaking into and robbing divers articles, the dwelling house of Hester Smith, at Box.
Source:Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 6 Mar 1820

Free Pardon, 24 Feb 1835
N.P (native place) Turley, near Bradford. (Turley- a hamlet in Winsley parish, Wiltshire)
source: Tasmanian Record CON31/1/38 Image102

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of George Jones:

Lent Assizes. The following prisoners were capitally convicted:...Joseph Greenaway and George Jones, for a burglary at Calne…. Of the above prisoners, only one, William Lee, convicted of uttering forged Bank of England notes, is left for execution; the rest are reprieved. Source: Morning Post, 15 Mar 1820.

Native place is Calne.Source: Tas Record Con31/1/23 Image 65

Lissa Kosovich on 7th April, 2019 wrote of William Paterson:

Stag ship sailed 2 Feb 1855 arrived Western Australia 23rd May 1855. Offence: Assault with intent to ravish. Court: Scotland: Stirling Court of Judiciary Glasgow 28 Sept 1852. 14 year sentence. Patterson William Convict # 3357. Occupation groom and carter. Aged 22 single, height 5’ 6 1/2”, hair light brown, eyes grey, face long, complexion fresh, middling stout, markings W.P. left arm, scar left wrist, second finger left hand

Lissa Kosovich on 7th April, 2019 wrote of William Harper:

Captain of ship was John E.W. Jackson. Arrived 4th July 1866. William Harper convict # 8873 aged 24, married, one child. He was a lace maker, height   5’ 2”,  hair dark brown, eyes light hazel, face oval, complexion fresh, middling stout, marks Ship on breast.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Phelps:

Salisbury. Thomas Phelps, charged on the oath of Robert Phelps, of Long Newnton, with stealing on the 17th ult., a promissory note of a guinea, a shirt, a pair of stockings,  and a handkerchief, the property of the said Robert Phelps, and also charged with escaping from the custody of Wm. Spencer, constable. Salisbury and Winchester Journal,14 Sep 1818

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of William Beckington:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…Wm Beckington, for stealing two pieces of cotton check, &c, the property of John Fox, Melksham;  Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of John Cottle:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol;  John Cottle, alias John Mustard, alias name unknown, charged with having, on Monday the ? of July last, stolen a fat bullock, the property of John Witchell, out of his field at Yatton Keynell.  Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal,14 Sept 1818

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…John Cottle for stealing a bullock, the property of John Witchell, Yatton Keynell;  Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Godwin:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…Thos. and John Godwin, for stealing six pigs, belonging to Scammel, at Durrington; ... Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of John Godwin:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence ... Thos. and John Godwin, for stealing six pigs, belonging to Scammel, at Durrington;... Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Jacob Carter:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence ...Jacob Carter, for stealing thirty yards of Kerseymere, the property of Jacob Carpenter, Trowbridge; Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Israel Hooper:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence… Israel Hooper, for having broken open the house of J. Budd, Trowbridge, and stealing 140 lb of cheese and other articles;..Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Jarvis House:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol…Jarvis House, Warminster. Labourer, charged with stealing halters, a crupper and a tack the property of Jeremiah Morgan at Warminster,…
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 21 Mar 1819

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of George Macdonald:

The prisoners on our calendar for trial, are eighty-one in number, as follows: Geo. Macdonald and Wm. Ayde, for stealing a mare, the property of T. and R. Large, at Lyneham.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 8 Mar 1819.

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence. ..G. Macdonald and W. Ayde, for stealing a mare, the property of Thomas Large; T. Johnson, for stealing sheep from Thomas Brown;...
Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of William Adey:

The prisoners on our calendar for trial, are eighty-one in number, as follows: Geo. Macdonald and Wm. Ayde, for stealing a mare, the property of T. and R. Large, at Lyneham.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 8 Mar 1819.

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence:G. Macdonald and W. Ayde, for stealing a mare, the property of Thomas Large;Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Peter Woodman on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Charles Woodman:

Nov 23rd 1835 Gross misconduct in seducing his master’s daughter who has borne a child to the prisoner. Recommend to be sent to Port Arthur during pleasure Lieut. Govnr.
Mar 19th 1838 Neglect of duty on his post as watchman
July 1 1839 Neglect of duty as watchman 3 days soly conft
Recommend to the Queen for a pardon No 467 7 Feb 1844 Appd March 1845
Supm Court Hobart 2nd March 1846 Cutting & wounding Elizh Jones with intent to kill & murder. Executed in Hobart.

Nell Murphy on 6th April, 2019 wrote of George Cookney:

Family information, as recorded in 1838 at VDL:
Brother Frederick, in this Colony.
1 brother in London
4 sisters - Mary (or Margaret), Emily, Thomasine & Caroline. 1 sister lives at St. Pancras as a solicitor.

MARRIAGE:
2 July 1855 - George COOKNEY, aged 56yrs, surveyer, to Margaret LYNCH, aged 22 yrs, spinster. At Church of Holy Trinity, Hobart. (ref. 37/1/14 no. 409)

DEATH REGISTRATION:
35/1/8 no. 3231 1876

It appears that wife Margaret COOKNEY (Lynch) remarried in 1888 to Robert NEALE.  (ref. 37/1/47 no. 258)

Nell Murphy on 6th April, 2019 wrote of George Cookney:

George COOKNEY arrived free to Sydney, Australia per the ship “Andromache”.  He worked in Sydney as a government architect.
(ref. newspaper articles 1825, 1826, 1832)
George COOKNEY was caught up with a group of people who were charged with stealing a looking glass and he was convicted of receiving stolen goods, as accessory after the fact. Sydney Supreme Court 22 May 1838.  He received a 7 yr transportation sentence and was sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship “Maria Watson” arriving 27 July 1838.

Single man; architect.

Assigned to work.
1839 - assigned to a Mr. Thompson. Misconduct. 14 days in cells, on bread & water.
1840 - assigned to Thompson. Absent without leave. 14 days hard labour and tread wheel.
1840 - assigned to Thompson. Absent again. 14 days in cells.
1840 - drunk & absent without leave. 6 mths hard labour working at Notman’s road gang.
Several other records of misconduct. Last noted in 1845. Ticket of Leave granted.
George is mentioned in a newspaper article in 1857, along with name of artitect Thomson.

1861: Death notice of Thomas COOKNEY, Piccadilly, London, brother of George , civil architect of this city - Hobart Mercury newspaper.

1862 - George Cookney, Hobart, unlicensed dog. (snr or jnr not stated)

1875 - Cookney children not attending school.

1876: Death of George COOKNEY, in his 77th year, after a long painful illness. on 22 Feb 1876 at his residence, Barrack St. Hobart, Tasmania.

George COOKNEY married and had at least two sons.
Death notice of his son John COOKNEY, in 1888, aged 28yrs.

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