Hi Guest!

Community Contributions

ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 5,000 10,000 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 10,350 new convicts added in total!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 25,762 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

104%

Goal: 1,000 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 50,000 contributions. We currently have 46,020 contributions.

92%

Recent Submissions

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of Robert Hayward:

Brief Profile at Time of Trial.
Convict: tried Northampton Assizes 2nd March 1816 sentenced to 7 years, Native place, Oxfordshire, age 19, 5’7 1/2 “, complexion fair, hair brown, eyes brown.
Source: Convict indent"Sir W. Bensley” page 195 fiche 637 shelf 4/4005

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of Robert Hayward:

Marriage?
Ann Blake and Biddy Sergeant appear to both have been spouses to Robert Hayward (although no solid evidence, only family stories and theories, could be found to support this). Biddy was apparently an aboriginal woman, with whom Robert Hayward had a long-term relationship that produced some (?) children. The only registered birth from this union is Sarah Hayward (born 1834). He also produced several children with Ann Blake.

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of Edward Mills:

Details for the ship Atlas I (2) (1819)
Ship Name: Atlas I (2) 
Rig Type: S.
Built: Shields
Build Year: 1801
Size (tons): 437
Voyage Details
Master: Joseph Short
Surgeon: John Duke
Sailed: 10 June 1819
From: Gravesend
Arrived: 19 October 1819
Port: PJ
Route: Cape
Days Travel: 131
Convicts Landed: 155 males & 0 female convicts
Notes:
Source: Claim a Convict Website http://www.hawkesbury.net.au/claimaconvict/index.php

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

Marriage
Married free settler Ann Bolton in about 1808 in NSW.

Source: Ancestry members’ family trees and Australian Royalty Website. http://australianroyalty.net.au/individual.php?pid=I68887&ged=purnellmccord.ged

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

Brief Profile
John’s indent papers describe him age 20 years, Native of Kildare , Farm Labourer, Catholic, 5ft 7inches, Dark Brown hair, Hazel eyes swarthy complexion, Life Sentence - Sentencing Ireland Jun 1801 Baltinglass County Wicklow Ireland. John was one of eight men sentenced at Baltinglass. He may have been involved in the 1798 Rebellion as where others on the convict ship ‘Atlas’.

Source: Australian Royalty Website http://australianroyalty.net.au/individual.php?pid=I68887&ged=purnellmccord.ged

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

More information and passenger list of Atlas (1802)
John Dempsey appears on list.

Details for the ship Atlas II (1802)
Ship Name: Atlas II
Rig Type: S.
Built: Quebec
Build Year: 1801
Size (tons): 547
Voyage Details
Master: Thomas Musgrave
Surgeon: Thomas Davie
Sailed: 30 May 1802
From: Cork
Arrived: 30 October 1802
Port: PJ
Route: Rio
Days Travel: 153
Convicts Landed: (not stated) males & female convicts
Notes:
List of convict passengers
Bagnall, Michael
Flahirty, Thomas
Molloy, Dennis
Smithers, James
Barrington, Charles
Hanrahan, Patrick
Montgomery, Patrick
Smyth, Neile
Bent, John
Houlahan, Michael
Moore, John
Stanley, Henry
Butler, Laurence
Houlahan, Thomas
Moore, Tristram
Stone, Henry
Callaghan, John
Lett, William
Morris, John
Temple, John
Callaghan, Michael
Lynch, John
Mulcahy, Timothy
Thompson, Edward
Crowe, Timothy
Magrath, Peter
Mulcany, Timothy
Tierney, Grimes
Delany, Nicholas
Mahony, John
Mullins, Thomas
Tracey, William
Dempsey, John
Mahony, Thomas
Mullony, John
Travener, John
Dihio, John
Malone, Patrick
Murphy, James
Walsh / Welch, William
Doran, Nicholas
Maloney, Patrick
Murphy, John
Welsh, William
Dowdall, Michael
Mason, Samuel
Murphy, Patrick
Doyle, Loughlin
McCarthy, James
Nowlan, Derby
Dwyer, Cornelius
McCormick, Bryan
Parker, James
Note: The number of convicts recorded on this site that are associated with the ship Atlas II is 53 .This figure may not correlate with the full listing of convicts recorded in official documents.

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

Crime and Place of Trial
There is no mention of the nature of the crime in any of the sources cited.
The place where the trial was held is written alternatively as Neas, Nais, and Naas in various sources.
Other sources list the trial location as, what appears to read, Baltinglass, Ireland

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

The Voyage of the Atlas
Atlas was a 435 ton sailing ship and convict ship that was dispatched in 1801 from Ireland to Australia. She was built in Souths Shields by Temple and launched in 1801 for Temple.

Under the command of Richard Brooks, between 1801 and 1803 she sailed for the East India Company, on a voyage that first had her carrying convicts from Ireland to Port Jackson, and then going on to China, before returning to England. She sailed under a letter of marque issued to Brooks on 17 August 1801.[2]

Atlas left Deptford on 16 July 1801, and Blackwall on 20 August. She reached Waterford on 19 September and Cork four days later.[3]

She sailed from Ireland on 29 November 1801, with 151 male and 28 female convicts. She arrived at Rio de Janeiro on 2 February 1802.[3]

Atlas arrived at Port Jackson on 7 July 1802.[4] Sixty-six male and two female convicts died on the voyage, or just after disembarkation. Governor Philip Gidley King censured Brooks for this high death rate, which was the result of his negligence and the overcrowding that his transport of his personal cargo caused. Thomas Jamison, Atlas??’?s surgeon, charged Brooks with assault in a civil action, and the transport commissioners threatened to prosecute him, but Brooks escaped punishment.[5]

Citations and references (from Wikipedia)
1. “Atlas”. East India Company Ships. Retrieved 28 April 2012.
2. Letter of Marque, 1793–1815, p.51;[23.
3. National Archives: Atlas (2),[3] - accessed 9 November 2014.
4. “Arrival of Vessels at Port Jackson, and their Departure”. Australian Town and Country Journal, Saturday 3 January 1891, p.16. Retrieved 4 February 2012

References
Bateson, Charles, The Convict Ships, 1787-1868, Sydney, 1974. ISBN 0-85174-195-9

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote of John Dempsey:

Source information for Arrival
Source Citation
Series: NRS 898; Reel or Fiche Numbers: Reels 6020-6040, 6070; Fiche 3260-3312
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Colonial Secretary’s Papers, 1788-1856 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.
Original data:
New South Wales Government. Main series of letters received, 1788-1825. Series 897, Reels 6041-6064, 6071-6072. State Records Authority of New South Wales. Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Special Bundles, 1794-1825. Series 898, Reels 6020-6040, 6070; Fiche 3260-3312. State Records Authority of New South Wales. Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.

Source Citation
State Archives NSW
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.
Original data:
New South Wales Government. Copies of returns of Absolute and Conditional Pardons granted. Series 1165. State Records Reel 774, copy of 4/4492. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of Conditional Pardons. Series 1170. State Records Reel 774. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Register of convicts recommended for Conditional Pardons. Series 1173. State Records Reel 797-798, copy of 4/4478-80. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Alphabetical registers of pardons. Series 1174. State Records Reel 798, copy of 6/884. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of Absolute Pardons. Series 1177. State Records Reel 800, copy of 4/4486-88. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of recommendations for Absolute Pardons. Series 1179. State Records Reel 800, copy of 4/4489-90. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Copies of Conditional Pardons Registered. Series 1172. Reels 775-796, 3037. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.

Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 8
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 1-4, 6-18, 28-30); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.

Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 1/1
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 1-4, 6-18, 28-30); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.

Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 10
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 1-4, 6-18, 28-30); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.

Barbara Crockett on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Charlotte Barnacle:

Charlotte had a son Thomas Barnacle at the Branch Factory but he died aged 7mths.  She applied to marry Thomas Crockett Aug 1845 which was granted, but no marriage took place. Charlotte gave birth to a daughter Eliza Crockett 25 May 1846 but she died aged 4 weeks.  In 1848 she gave birth to George Crockett.  Ticket of Leave granted Aug 1848.
In May 1849 Ticket of Leave was revoked as she absconded with Walter Crockett to Victoria with her surviving child. Walter and Charlotte moved around the state eventually settling in Tarrawingee NE Victoria.  Not sure what happened in that Charlotte didn’t marry Thomas Crockett (Walter and Thomas were not related as far as I know-Walter has one brother George).
Charlotte went on to have 10 children and on her death certificate and Walter’s,all are listed as their children.

Both are buried in the Tarrawingee Cemetery.

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of William Madgwick:

The Story of William Madgwick, Elizabeth Phipps and James Westbrook

William Madgwick was born on the 5th of March 1769 in Fittleworth, Sussex, England. He married a woman called Mary Mansfield in 1793 at Sussex. Together they had five children: James (b. 16 February 1794 Fittleworth), William (b. 23 October 1796 Fittleworth), Thomas (b. 16 June 1799 Fittlworth), Mary (b. 19 February 1804) and Charles (b. 18 November 1808).

Abt. 1812 William was caught for sheep stealing and was sentenced to death at the Sussex Court. Death of course meant he was to be sent to Australia as a convict. In 1813 he left England onboard the General Hewitt. His wife and children did not follow as many of other convict families did, instead the family announced that he had died. William arrived in Australia in 1814. It took him a mere four years before he was given an Conditional Pardon in 1818.
Meanwhile…
Elizabeth Phipps was born on the 17th of February c.1792 in London to Edmund Phipps (b. 11th of May 1760 in Marylebone, London) and Susannah Harris (b. 12th of May 1768 Shoreditch, London).

James Westbrook (b. 1789 London) was one of three children born to Edward Westbrook and Elizabeth Fitchett. His brother’s name was Samuel and he had a younger sister whose name is unknown.

James and Elizabeth first came onto record when they were caught along with Elizabeth’s mother and James’s brother for breaking and entering the house of Joseph Covington. At the time James was a butcher. Their trail was held at the Old Bailey and like many others their fate was sealed there. James aged 22 and Elizabeth aged 20 were found guilty whilst Susannah Phipps and Samuel Westbrook were found not guilty. The year was 1812 when they were sentenced to death (transportation to Australia for life).

James came to Australia with 45 other convicts onboard the ‘Earl Spencer’. He arrived in the colony on the 9th of October 1813 where he was given to William Cox, the magistrate at Windsor and was distributed on the 14th of October 1813.

In his time as a convict James lived in Bathurst where he was one of the workers on the construction of the road over the Blue Mountains. By the 7th of July 1818 James was on William Cox’s list to have his sentence of life reduced. He received his conditional pardon on the 13th of July 1818.

Meanwhile Elizabeth arrived in Australia on the ‘Wanstead’ on the 9th of January 1814. She was freed by 1816. During her time as a convict Elizabeth met William Madgwick who she would eventually marry.
In 1834 William married Elizabeth Phipps at the right old age of 66.
Elizabeth gave birth to nine children. It is unknown whether the father of the children was James Westbrook or William Madgwick. It is believed that the majority of them did belong to James Westbrook.
James Westbrook died of old age on the 14th of July 1859 in Windsor Hospital, NSW. He is buried in St. Matthews, Windsor, NSW. Elizabeth Phipps died on the 8th of August 1869 in Richmond. She is buried in St Peters, Richmond, NSW.
William Madgwick passed away of old age on 16th of June 1860 in Richmond, NSW. On the NSW BDM it states that he was 108 years old but in truth he would have been about 91. He was buried on the 18 June 1860 in St Peters, Richmond.
The children of James, Elizabeth and William can appear in the registries under one surname but then they might have lived under the other name and died under yet another i.e. born a Westbrook, lived a Magick, died a Madgwick.

Source: The Stuart Family Message Board
The Magick/Madgwick family: http://stuartfamilyhistory.proboards.com/thread/2/magick-madgwick-family
The Phipps and Westbrook Families: http://stuartfamilyhistory.proboards.com/thread/4

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Elizabeth Phipps:

The Story of William Madgwick, Elizabeth Phipps and James Westbrook

William Madgwick was born on the 5th of March 1769 in Fittleworth, Sussex, England. He married a woman called Mary Mansfield in 1793 at Sussex. Together they had five children: James (b. 16 February 1794 Fittleworth), William (b. 23 October 1796 Fittleworth), Thomas (b. 16 June 1799 Fittlworth), Mary (b. 19 February 1804) and Charles (b. 18 November 1808).

Abt. 1812 William was caught for sheep stealing and was sentenced to death at the Sussex Court. Death of course meant he was to be sent to Australia as a convict. In 1813 he left England onboard the General Hewitt. His wife and children did not follow as many of other convict families did, instead the family announced that he had died. William arrived in Australia in 1814. It took him a mere four years before he was given an Conditional Pardon in 1818.
Meanwhile…
Elizabeth Phipps was born on the 17th of February c.1792 in London to Edmund Phipps (b. 11th of May 1760 in Marylebone, London) and Susannah Harris (b. 12th of May 1768 Shoreditch, London).

James Westbrook (b. 1789 London) was one of three children born to Edward Westbrook and Elizabeth Fitchett. His brother’s name was Samuel and he had a younger sister whose name is unknown.

James and Elizabeth first came onto record when they were caught along with Elizabeth’s mother and James’s brother for breaking and entering the house of Joseph Covington. At the time James was a butcher. Their trail was held at the Old Bailey and like many others their fate was sealed there. James aged 22 and Elizabeth aged 20 were found guilty whilst Susannah Phipps and Samuel Westbrook were found not guilty. The year was 1812 when they were sentenced to death (transportation to Australia for life).

James came to Australia with 45 other convicts onboard the ‘Earl Spencer’. He arrived in the colony on the 9th of October 1813 where he was given to William Cox, the magistrate at Windsor and was distributed on the 14th of October 1813.

In his time as a convict James lived in Bathurst where he was one of the workers on the construction of the road over the Blue Mountains. By the 7th of July 1818 James was on William Cox’s list to have his sentence of life reduced. He received his conditional pardon on the 13th of July 1818.

Meanwhile Elizabeth arrived in Australia on the ‘Wanstead’ on the 9th of January 1814. She was freed by 1816. During her time as a convict Elizabeth met William Madgwick who she would eventually marry.
In 1834 William married Elizabeth Phipps at the right old age of 66.
Elizabeth gave birth to nine children. It is unknown whether the father of the children was James Westbrook or William Madgwick. It is believed that the majority of them did belong to James Westbrook.
James Westbrook died of old age on the 14th of July 1859 in Windsor Hospital, NSW. He is buried in St. Matthews, Windsor, NSW. Elizabeth Phipps died on the 8th of August 1869 in Richmond. She is buried in St Peters, Richmond, NSW.
William Madgwick passed away of old age on 16th of June 1860 in Richmond, NSW. On the NSW BDM it states that he was 108 years old but in truth he would have been about 91. He was buried on the 18 June 1860 in St Peters, Richmond.
The children of James, Elizabeth and William can appear in the registries under one surname but then they might have lived under the other name and died under yet another i.e. born a Westbrook, lived a Magick, died a Madgwick.

Source: The Stuart Family Message Board
The Magick/Madgwick family: http://stuartfamilyhistory.proboards.com/thread/2/magick-madgwick-family
The Phipps and Westbrook Families: http://stuartfamilyhistory.proboards.com/thread/4

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Elizabeth Phipps:

Marriage to William Magick (Madgwick)
1834
Sydney
Source Information
Ancestry.com. Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Original data: Compiled from publicly available sources.

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Elizabeth Phipps:

More Details of Ship ‘Wanstead”
Wanstead left for New South Wales with 120 female convicts
WANSTEAD - 1814

(Green Book - Underwriters)
Master: Captain H. Moore
Rigging: Ship; 2 decks; sheached in copper in 1813; fastened with copper bolts
Tonnage: 253 tons
Construction: in America; vessel 3 years old
Owners: H. Moore
Draught under load: 14 feet
Port of survey: London
Voyage: sailed for Botany Bay

(Red Book - Shipowners)
Master: Captain H. Moore
Rigging: Ship; 2 decks; sheathed in copper in 1813; mostly copper bolts
Tonnage: 253 tons
Construction: 1811 in Newbury Point
Owners: Captain
Draught under load: 15 feet
Port of survey: London
Voyage: sailed for Botany Bay
Source:
http://www.webruler.com/gprovost/ShipsV_to_Z1.htm

Dennis Nightingale on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Thomas Reilly:

133162 Reilly Thomas - Guildford 1829.  1829 November - AO NSW Convict Indents Fiche No. 673.
Age 18. Farm boy from Westmeath. Sentenced to 7 years transportation for stealing clothes. Assigned to Timothy Nowlan at Hunter River on arrival.

Dennis Nightingale on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Thomas Reilly:

Born - Westmeath Ireland. Single - 3 brothers here Luke Reilley arrived per Phoenix III (1826) Peter Reilly arrived per Guildford (8) [1829] Francis Reilly arrived per Bussorah Merchant (3) [1831]. Sent to Norfolk Island.

Dennis Nightingale on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Peter Reilly:

Born - Westmeath Ireland. Single -3 brothers here Luke Reilley arrived per Phoenix III (1826) Thomas Reilly arrived per Guildford (8) [1829] Francis Reilly arrived per Bussorah Merchant (3) [1831]

Dennis Nightingale on 6th June, 2015 wrote of John Redmond:

29917 Redmond George - Guildford 1829.  1834 18 November Maitland SG.
Obtained Ticket of Leave.

Dennis Nightingale on 6th June, 2015 wrote of John Redmond:

Born - Dublin County Ireland. Single - Slaters boy.

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Thomas Garbett:

Source Information (Additional) for Death
Source Information:
Ancestry.com. Tasmania, Australia, Index to Death Notices in The Mercury, 1854-1930 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.
Original data: J & F O’Shea and K & A Whitton, comp. “Indexes to Birth, Death and Marriage Notices.” Tasmanian Family History Society Inc., Hobart Branch.

Janeena Woodville on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Susannah Wainwright:

Susannah told her children she was Irish and born in Balbriggan, County Dublin and not Stockport in Manchester as her court transcripts state.

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Thomas Garbett:

Appearance (at age 22)
Eyes: Grey
Hair: Light brown
Height: 5’6 and 1/2”
Source:New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849

Janeena Woodville on 6th June, 2015 wrote of John Painter:

Family history says John was possibly born in Wales rather than Tewkesbury.

D Wong on 6th June, 2015 wrote of Patrick Blake:

Patrick Blake was 28 years old and his native place was Meath.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
BLAKE, Patrick. Per “Daphne”, 1819
1819 Sep 28: On list of convicts disembarked from the “Daphne” and forwarded to Liverpool; for the public roads (Reel 6006; 4/3500 p.276)

There were no further records of him on the NSW Government Convict Records.

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote of John Mills:

John Mills Appearance
Complexion:  Ruddy
Hair:  Light brown
Eyes:  Grey
Height:  5’3”
Distinguishing marks:  Dark large mole inside each arm

Souces;
• New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842
• New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870

‹ First  < 1245 1246 1247 1248 1249 1250 1251 1252 1253 1254 1255 1256 1257 1258 1259 >  Last ›