Hi Guest!

Community Contributions

ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 5,000 10,000 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 7,507 new convicts added in total!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 28,605 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

75%

Goal: 1,000 5,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 Contributions

By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 50,000 contributions. We currently have 34,249 contributions.

68%

Recent Submissions

Maureen Withey on 10th August, 2019 wrote of William Bacon:

1828 Census at Parramatta, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
William Bacon, age 24, prisoner, ship,  Mary, 1822, Life, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, protestant.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Robert Rhodes:

Mistake in above entry. Parramatta is NOT in Van Dienman’s Land. Sorry!

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Richard Lawson:

1828 Census at Parramatta, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
Richard Lawson, age 23, prisoner, ship,  Marq. of Hastings, 1825, Life, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, protestant.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of George Hughes:

1828 Census at Parramatta, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
George Hughes, age 42, prisoner, ship,  Elizabeth, 1819, Life, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, protestant.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of John Knight:

1828 Census at Parramatta, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
John Knight, age 30, prisoner, ship Hindostan, 1821, Life, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, Protestant.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Robert Rhodes:

1828 Census at Parramatta, Van Diemen’s Land, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
Robert Rhodes, age 33, prisoner, ship Elizabeth, 1816, 3 years Col. Sentence, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, Protestant.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Robert Henry Dye:

1828 Census at Parramatta, No 5 Iron Gang, Baulkham Hills
Robert Dye, age 36, prisoner, ship Sir W. Bensley, 1816, 14 years, Government employment, resident at Baulkham Hills, Protestant.

Iris Dunne on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Elizabeth Hepplewhite:

Criminal Registers:
- aged 16, Trial 31 December 1838, Offence Larceny by Servant, Imprisoned 6 months
- aged 17, Trial 29 June 1840, Offence Larceny before convicted of Felony

Description List: Trade House Servant, aged 18 years

Conduct Record: Transported for Larceny (stealing 2 shirts), Single, Tried 29 June 1840, Certificate of Freedom 6 July 1847
https://librariestas.ent.sirsidynix.net.au/client/en_AU/all/search/detailnonmodal/ent:$002f$002fNAME_INDEXES$002f0$002fNAME_INDEXES:1401154/one?qu=elizabeth&qu=hepplewhite&qf=NI_SHIP_FACET Ship+(Names+Index) Navarino Navarino+||+Navarino+(1) Navarino+(1)

Judy Pitt on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Edward Plummer:

Death:  Died at Woodside, S.A. [District of Nairne, Book 171 Page 388]
Marriage:  Trinity Church, Adelaide, S.A. [District of Adelaide, Book 21 Page 113].  Both widowed. 
Children with Emma:
Isabel 1847-07-22 Port Road, Adelaide
Henry 1849-12-22 Tenterden Adelaide [Woodville Sth
Charles 1854-02-13 Adelaide
George 1859-10-31 Adelaide
Anna Elizabeth 1861-09-17 Adelaide]
Helen 1865-04-12, Died 1865-04-15 Woodside, S.A.
David 1868-01-31 Woodside, S.A.

Judy Pitt on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Elizabeth Hepplewhite:

Parents: Ralph & Isabella.
Born: 1822
Baptism: 18 Nov 1822 St. Paul’s, Parish of Yarrow
Source:  Northumberland and Durham Baptisms Transcription
Married William LANGLEY 17 Apr 1847 Launceston, Tasmania.  [Reg. No. 1167/1847]
Died 30 Aug 1903 Parkside Lunatic Asylum, Adelaide, Sth. Aust. of senile decay and dementia.  [District of Norwood, Book 296 Page 384].  Residence was Grange, S.A.
Children:
Isabella Ann 1848-05-30 Port Adelaide, S.A.
Sarah Jane 1850-06-09 Port Adelaide, S.A.
Ralph Samuel Hepplewhite 1855-02-28 Adelaide, S.A.
Thomas Giles 1857-06-13 Port Adelaide, S.A.
Elizabeth Matilda 1860-05-11 Queenstown, S.A.
Charles Alexander Hall 1862-05-18 Port Adelaide,SA
May also have a son William Henry born 1845.

Wendy Smith on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Ann Gillham:

The Annotated Convict Indents 1838 state that Ann was 22 years old; could neither read nor write; Religion Protestant; status single; Occupation a maid of all works and a native of Surry.  She was tried fro stealing shawls at the Surry Quarter Session on 22 May 1837 and sentenced to 7 years.  She was 5 feet 4 3/4 inches; complexion- Fair ruddy freckled and pock pitted; Hair brown and Eyes grey.  Prisoner number 38/311.  She received her Certificate of Freedom on 5 December 1844 Number 44/1780.
Worked for Mr Robert Campbell in Sydney.  Absconded from him on August 24 1839 Robert Campbell also owned Duntroon on Limestone Plains in what is now Canberra.
Permission was granted to marry Mr James Barrett (Marquis of Hastings) on 24 October 1839 at Brisbane Waters.

Wendy Smith on 9th August, 2019 wrote of William Vesty:

Married 15 January 1855 Bridget Kelly at Christ Church, Longford in Tasmania.  Bridget was 28 years old.  On 20 March 1868 married Sarah Roebuck nee Wakeham at Launceston Wesleyan Church.  Sarah was a widow and 37 years old.  Her father, Richard Wakeham, was one of the witness.  He had travelled on the same transport ship as William to Van Diemen’s Land.  Tragically Sarah was burnt to death at home on 28 July 1880 aged 50 years.
William died in Ringarooma, Tasmania in 1900.

Wendy Smith on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Robert Roebuck:

UK Hulk records state that Robert Roebuck was 31.  Convicted at Sheffield Quarter Sessions on 25 October 1841 for stealing from a dwelling house.  Sentenced to 10 years.  He was a widower with four children.  Could read and write.
Ancestry Father William Roebuck (1783-Jan 1861) and mother Hannah Bullous (1784-1844).  Married Dianah Belk 26 December 1826 at St. Mary’s, Ecclesfield in Sheffield, England, UK.  Dianah died in 1839.
Received his Ticket of Leave on July 19th 1849 and his Certificate of Freedom on 3 November 1851.
On 4 February was granted approval to marry Miss Sarah Wakeham.  They married on 24 February 1851 at St. John’s, Launceston when Sarah was 22 and Robert 44.  Sarah’s father, Richard Wakeham, had been convicted of stealing wool and been transported on the Equestrian (1).
Have not found Robert’s death certificate but Sarah remarried on 20 March 1868 to William Vesty.  William had been transported on the Equestrian (1) along with her father.

Iris Dunne on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Ellis Wallis:

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey
Theft: shoplifting
568. ELLIS WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , fifty yards of ribbon, value 55 s. the property of Richard Green , senior, Richard Green , junior, and Charles Green , privately, in their shop .

CHARLES GREEN . My partners are Richard Green, senior, and Richard Green, junior. Our shop is No. 6, Mary-le-bone Street, Golden-square . We are haberdasher s. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was coming from the warehouse. I looked through the window to see if they were busy in the shop. I saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in her hand, which she then drew towards her pocket. I went down stairs, and mentioned the circumstance to my father; and when the prisoner was going out of the shop, I stopped her. I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might know what she had got. She went readily with me. I then called Mr. Wright, to see what she had taken. She took from her pocket then a piece of ribbon, which is in the possession of the constable. The ribbon was on a block, about eighteen yards. I then left her in the care of Wright, while I went and consuited what I should do with her. I know no more of my own knowledge.

Q. Who were the persons serving in the shop - A. Wright and Robinson.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. James’s , Westminster.

- ROBINSON. Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master’s shop - A. No; I was there serving behind the counter. There were a drawer of ribbons, from which she took out a piece of ribbon, from which I cut her off two yards of ribbon, and she paid me for it. She turned to go out. We did not suspect that she had taken any thing.
JOHN WRIGHT . Q. You are a shopman in this shop, are you - A. Yes. I was called into the back room. I saw nothing of the transaction until I was called in. Mr. Green then told her, that she had something in her pocket of his. She pulled a piece of ribbon out of her pocket, and gave it me; that piece contained eight yards. Mr. Green then left the room. The prisoner said, she hoped he would forgive her. I then asked her, if she had any more ribbon. She said, she had not any more. I told her to sit down. She had not sat down above four or five minutes, before I heard something fall upon the floor, immediately under her. I looked round, and saw it was a piece of ribbon. I picked it up, and there was nothing else on the floor. That was on the block, the same as the other. There were fifteen or sixteen yards of it. I asked her, if that was all. She said, yes. I watched her close. Another piece fell from her that was on the block. I suppose there is thirteen or fourteen yards in that piece. Mr. Green came into the room, and I went for the officer. He came and took charge of her.

Q. What would be the worth of this quantity of ribbon - A. Thirty shillings or upwards.

Prisoner’s Defence. My Lord, I humbly implore you to extend your mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude; not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18120701-50

Criminal Registers: aged 21, Trial 4 July 1812, Offence Larceny

Transportation Registers, 1810-1817, Tried 1 July 1812, aged 21

Previously transported on ship Emu 1812

Iris Dunne on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Ellis Wallis:

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey
Theft: shoplifting
568. ELLIS WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , fifty yards of ribbon, value 55 s. the property of Richard Green , senior, Richard Green , junior, and Charles Green , privately, in their shop .

CHARLES GREEN . My partners are Richard Green, senior, and Richard Green, junior. Our shop is No. 6, Mary-le-bone Street, Golden-square . We are haberdasher s. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was coming from the warehouse. I looked through the window to see if they were busy in the shop. I saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in her hand, which she then drew towards her pocket. I went down stairs, and mentioned the circumstance to my father; and when the prisoner was going out of the shop, I stopped her. I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might know what she had got. She went readily with me. I then called Mr. Wright, to see what she had taken. She took from her pocket then a piece of ribbon, which is in the possession of the constable. The ribbon was on a block, about eighteen yards. I then left her in the care of Wright, while I went and consuited what I should do with her. I know no more of my own knowledge.

Q. Who were the persons serving in the shop - A. Wright and Robinson.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. James’s , Westminster.

- ROBINSON. Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master’s shop - A. No; I was there serving behind the counter. There were a drawer of ribbons, from which she took out a piece of ribbon, from which I cut her off two yards of ribbon, and she paid me for it. She turned to go out. We did not suspect that she had taken any thing.
JOHN WRIGHT . Q. You are a shopman in this shop, are you - A. Yes. I was called into the back room. I saw nothing of the transaction until I was called in. Mr. Green then told her, that she had something in her pocket of his. She pulled a piece of ribbon out of her pocket, and gave it me; that piece contained eight yards. Mr. Green then left the room. The prisoner said, she hoped he would forgive her. I then asked her, if she had any more ribbon. She said, she had not any more. I told her to sit down. She had not sat down above four or five minutes, before I heard something fall upon the floor, immediately under her. I looked round, and saw it was a piece of ribbon. I picked it up, and there was nothing else on the floor. That was on the block, the same as the other. There were fifteen or sixteen yards of it. I asked her, if that was all. She said, yes. I watched her close. Another piece fell from her that was on the block. I suppose there is thirteen or fourteen yards in that piece. Mr. Green came into the room, and I went for the officer. He came and took charge of her.

Q. What would be the worth of this quantity of ribbon - A. Thirty shillings or upwards.

Prisoner’s Defence. My Lord, I humbly implore you to extend your mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude; not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18120701-50

Criminal Registers: aged 21, Trial 4 July 1812, Offence Larceny

Transportation Registers, 1810-1817, Tried 1 July 1812, aged 21

See also ship Broxbournebury in 1814

Xena Ish on 9th August, 2019 wrote of James Chrisford:

21 Aug 1827 - Certificate of Freedom NO: 27/826.

Xena Ish on 9th August, 2019 wrote of James Chrisford:

1823 Molles Main: purchased with his brother William 35 acres from B Jackson.  Cleared ground of 30 acres where they grew maize, wheat, and barley. ½ acre was taken up with garden and orchard.  Livestock included 35 horses, 4 horned cattle, and 12 hogs. Land was leased from J Nettleton giving them 140 acres in total.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Thomas Smith:

The Inquest was held yesterday morning before P. A. Mulorave, Esq., coroner.
The Jury met at 10 o’clock, at the Court House, and after viewing the bodies, returned ; when the first witness called was Thomas Rogers, who being sworn, stated — that Brown and Jeffkins came to a hut at Port Sorell, where he was employed as a lime burner, on Sunday, the 1st. of Feb., in a very bad state as to clothing ; they had no shoes, but had pieces of leather and blanket tied about their feet ; Brown had a gray jacket drawn on instead of trowsers, and Jeffkins had a blanket sewed up round him ; they had each a ragged shirt and no other clothing ; they appeared weak, scarcely able to stand ; they were both armed with double barrelled guns ; they tied him and another man ; an old man who was in the hut they did not tie ; they ordered him to get them something to eat ; they said they had nothing to eat for five days ; but a parrot and a cockatoo, and were 3 days without water they remained all night, and kept us tied ; one kept watch whilst the other slept; they eat a great deal during the night ; their stomachs would not retain their food they were so weak, and they frequently went out to vomit ; next morning they got up before day and ordered the old man to bake a damper ; they told us they were going to a bark chopper’s hut, three quarters of a mile from our hut ; they marched us up to the place where the ’ barkers’ lived ; Brown went up, Jeffkins following; Brown asked a man at the hut where his comrades where ; we then saw three constables coming over a hill at a short distance; Brown ran towards them ; he immediately levelled his piece and fired ; I saw a man fall ; he then fired the other barrell ; directly after I saw a gun fired by one of the party and Brown fell ; Jeffkins ran up and said ‘get up you cowardly b———r and come on .’  Brown said he could not ; Jeffkins rested his gun against a tree, and fired ; he cried to the party ’ come on there is enough o you to eat me ;’ he presented his gun and I think fired a second time ; I saw him soon after fall, after hearing a gun fired from the party ; I did not hear anything pass between the party and Brown before the firing ; I heard something said by the party when Jeffkins was behind the tree, but do not know what it was ; after the firing when I went up to the party, I found the constable who was shot, and whose name was Smith, still living, but he died soon afterwards ; Jeffkins died after the constable ; they were both shot through the head ; Brown was wounded in the body and had his left arm crushed by the shot : I called out to the constables when Jeffkins fell that there was no more of the bushrangers ; I should know the constables who were of the party if I saw them — [The men — James Small, James Buckley, (who were with Smith when he was shot,) John Harris, Frederick Carman, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Richard Berbrage, and Thomas Walker, —were then brought in and were recognised by the witness]— I saw nine constables in the party ; I only know two of the constables ; six came up after the skirmish commenced ; Brown and Jeffkins took clothes from us when they were in the hut on Sunday ; they did not say anything, but took them from the box in the hut.
[The next witness examined was a comrade of Rogers, living in the same but ; but as his evidence was only confirmatory of that of the preceding witness, we have not thought it necessary to occupy the space it would take.  No additional facts were elicited from him in evidence.]
Wm. Seccombe, being sworn, said — I am Assistant Colonial Surgeon ; I have examined the body of Thomas Smith, constable, now lying dead ; he has come to his death by a penetrating gun-shot wound, entering the perietal bone, anteri, passing through and out of the upper part of the occiputal bone, destroying the upper part of the brain, and fracturing all the bones of the cranium ; instant death must have ensued ; — I have examined the body of George Jeffkins ; he has also come to his death by a penetrating gun-shot wound, apparently passing from the left to right side of the crown of the head, destroying the brain, and shattering all the bones of the cranium ; — I have examined the body of Edward Brown ; he has come to his death by penetrating gun shot wounds ; one passing into the left side, entering and fracturing the middle of the eighth rib, passing through the diaphragm, perforating the stomach through the left lobe of the liver, again passing through the diaphragm on the right side, wounding the right lung, taking an oblique direction between the cartilages of the false ribs, and making its exit about four inches below, and anterially to the right nipple ; another penetrating gun-shot wound on the left side of the back, taking an oblique direction downwards, fracturing the left transverse procis of the fifth dorsal vertebrae, penetrating into and dividing the spinal marrow ; there are also bullet wounds through the left arm, fracturing the bone into several pieces ; there is another gun shot wound on the top of the left shoulder, passing about six inches beneath the integruments, and then escaping ; either of the first two wounds would have caused certain death.
The Jury without retiring returned the Verdict— Murder against Brown and Jeffkins— Justifiable Homicide in the case of their death.
Constable Smith, it will be seen by a notice signed by the Commandant, in another column, will be buried to-morrow ; on which occasion it is the intention of a number of respectable inhabitants to give their attendance. We deem this acknowledgment of the services of the deceased as very becoming and appropriate.

THE FUNERAL of the deceased Constable Thomas Smith, who fell at the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, being to take place THIS DAY, at 2 o’clock, p.m., such of the inhabitants of the town is feel desirous of marking their regret for the death of all active and zealous member of the police in so meritorious a service, are requested to give their attendance. The funeral will start from the Watch-house.
J. FAIRWEATHER,
Commandant.
Launceston, Thursday, Feb. 5, 1835.
Launceston Advertiser, 5 Feb 1835

Thomas Smith, Caledonia, killed on the 2nd instant, at the capture of the Bushrangers Jeffkins and Brown.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Henry Chalk:

Henry Chalk, of New Sarum, labourer, charged with stealing two sacks, one belonging to Wm. Winter, the other to Edmund Roach.
Salisbury journal, 8 Dec 1828.

...at Sarum city sessions; and ...Henry Chalke, at the same sessions, to transportation for 7 years for a first offence, and 7 years transportation for a second, to commence at the expiration of the former sentence.
Salisbury Journal, Mon 23 Feb 1829

Tasmanian Records - Description
Henry Chalk, No 994.
Common labourer, age 22, height 5 ft 8 ½. Brown hair and whiskers, brown eyes. Dimple in centre of chin, and scar on back of right hand near little finger. Native place, Oat Green, Hants.

Henry Chalk, Carter and Labourer. Age 22, Assigned to Major Lee.

Heather on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Joseph Malpas:

Married: Charlotte Malpass
Address: Accommodation Row, Vauxhall Lane, Aston,Nr Birmingham
Source: Deposition records for 1834, Warwickshire records office

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Henry Chalk:

Henry Chalk was given a Free Pardon for his part in capturing two bushrangers.
Free Pardon No 136, 19 February 1835

COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Feb. 18, 1835.
THE Lieutenant Governor has much pleasure in notifying the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, by a party of the Police under circumstances reflecting much credit upon the individuals concerned, to whom his Excellency has granted the following rewards, under the Government Notices of 21st Feb. and 4th March 1834, viz:—  To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbidge, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 (holding a Conditional Pardon) 250 acres of land each, for the apprehension of Jeffkins, and to the said Richard Burbidge, a Free Pardon.
To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbridge (holding a Conditional Pardon) James Smeed, 817, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 years, per England ; Henry Chalk, 994, 14 years, per Thames; William Birmingham, 881, 14 years, per Medway ; Frederick Carman, 934, life, per Georgiana ; John Harris, 181, 14 years, per Dromedary ; and the representative of Thomas Smith, the sum of £33 6s. 8d. each, being their respective shares of the rewards offered in the before-mentioned Government Notices, for the apprehension of Jeffkins and Brown, viz. £200 for the former, and £100 for the latter.  His Excellency has also approved of free pardons and £30 each, being granted to James Smeed, James Buckley, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Frederick Carman, and John Harris.

By his Excellency’s command,
J. MONTAGU.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of William Birmingham:

COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Feb. 18, 1835.
THE Lieutenant Governor has much pleasure in notifying the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, by a party of the Police under circumstances reflecting much credit upon the individuals concerned, to whom his Excellency has granted the following rewards, under the Government Notices of 21st Feb. and 4th March 1834, viz:—  To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbidge, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 (holding a Conditional Pardon) 250 acres of land each, for the apprehension of Jeffkins, and to the said Richard Burbidge, a Free Pardon.
To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbridge (holding a Conditional Pardon) James Smeed, 817, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 years, per England ; Henry Chalk, 994, 14 years, per Thames; William Birmingham, 881, 14 years, per Medway ; Frederick Carman, 934, life, per Georgiana ; John Harris, 181, 14 years, per Dromedary ; and the representative of Thomas Smith, the sum of £33 6s. 8d. each, being their respective shares of the rewards offered in the before-mentioned Government Notices, for the apprehension of Jeffkins and Brown, viz. £200 for the former, and £100 for the latter.  His Excellency has also approved of free pardons and £30 each, being granted to James Smeed, James Buckley, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Frederick Carman, and John Harris.

By his Excellency’s command,
J. MONTAGU.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of Frederick Carman:

Frederick Carman was given a Free Pardon for his part in the capture of two bushrangers.

Fredk. Carman, Free Pardon No 133, 19 Febry. 1835

COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Feb. 18, 1835.
THE Lieutenant Governor has much pleasure in notifying the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, by a party of the Police under circumstances reflecting much credit upon the individuals concerned, to whom his Excellency has granted the following rewards, under the Government Notices of 21st Feb. and 4th March 1834, viz:—  To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbidge, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 (holding a Conditional Pardon) 250 acres of land each, for the apprehension of Jeffkins, and to the said Richard Burbidge, a Free Pardon.
To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbridge (holding a Conditional Pardon) James Smeed, 817, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 years, per England ; Henry Chalk, 994, 14 years, per Thames; William Birmingham, 881, 14 years, per Medway ; Frederick Carman, 934, life, per Georgiana ; John Harris, 181, 14 years, per Dromedary ; and the representative of Thomas Smith, the sum of £33 6s. 8d. each, being their respective shares of the rewards offered in the before-mentioned Government Notices, for the apprehension of Jeffkins and Brown, viz. £200 for the former, and £100 for the latter.  His Excellency has also approved of free pardons and £30 each, being granted to James Smeed, James Buckley, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Frederick Carman, and John Harris.

By his Excellency’s command,
J. MONTAGU.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of John Harris:

There are 2 men named John Harris on this ship. This one is No.181.

John Harris was given a free pardon No. 134, 19th February 1835, for his part in the capture of two bushrangers.

COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Feb. 18, 1835.
THE Lieutenant Governor has much pleasure in notifying the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, by a party of the Police under circumstances reflecting much credit upon the individuals concerned, to whom his Excellency has granted the following rewards, under the Government Notices of 21st Feb. and 4th March 1834, viz:—  To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbidge, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 (holding a Conditional Pardon) 250 acres of land each, for the apprehension of Jeffkins, and to the said Richard Burbidge, a Free Pardon.
To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbridge (holding a Conditional Pardon) James Smeed, 817, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 years, per England ; Henry Chalk, 994, 14 years, per Thames; William Birmingham, 881, 14 years, per Medway ; Frederick Carman, 934, life, per Georgiana ; John Harris, 181, 14 years, per Dromedary ; and the representative of Thomas Smith, the sum of £33 6s. 8d. each, being their respective shares of the rewards offered in the before-mentioned Government Notices, for the apprehension of Jeffkins and Brown, viz. £200 for the former, and £100 for the latter.  His Excellency has also approved of free pardons and £30 each, being granted to James Smeed, James Buckley, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Frederick Carman, and John Harris.

By his Excellency’s command,
J. MONTAGU.

Maureen Withey on 9th August, 2019 wrote of James Buckley:

COLONIAL SECRETARY’S OFFICE, Feb. 18, 1835.
THE Lieutenant Governor has much pleasure in notifying the capture of the bushrangers, Jeffkins and Brown, by a party of the Police under circumstances reflecting much credit upon the individuals concerned, to whom his Excellency has granted the following rewards, under the Government Notices of 21st Feb. and 4th March 1834, viz:—  To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbidge, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 (holding a Conditional Pardon) 250 acres of land each, for the apprehension of Jeffkins, and to the said Richard Burbidge, a Free Pardon.
To Thomas Walker, (free) Richard Burbridge (holding a Conditional Pardon) James Smeed, 817, life, per Governor Ready; James Buckley, 1728, 14 years, per England ; Henry Chalk, 994, 14 years, per Thames; William Birmingham, 881, 14 years, per Medway ; Frederick Carman, 934, life, per Georgiana ; John Harris, 181, 14 years, per Dromedary ; and the representative of Thomas Smith, the sum of £33 6s. 8d. each, being their respective shares of the rewards offered in the before-mentioned Government Notices, for the apprehension of Jeffkins and Brown, viz. £200 for the former, and £100 for the latter.  His Excellency has also approved of free pardons and £30 each, being granted to James Smeed, James Buckley, Henry Chalk, William Birmingham, Frederick Carman, and John Harris.

By his Excellency’s command,
J. MONTAGU.

‹ First  < 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 >  Last ›