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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Brooks:

NSW 1828 Census, at at Berling, Cooke,
A servant in the Household of farmer, Robert Lowe and his family.

Elizabeth Brooks, 32, G.S. Grenada, 1827, 7 yrs, nursery maid, protestant.

Margaret Weston on 14th February, 2020 wrote of George Chaproniere:

George was arrested for stealing a necklace and was convicted at Newington on 7th June 1830 he was sent to the “Hulk” Hardy at Portsmouth till 25th June 1830 when he was put on the Royal Admiral bound for NSW.

Margaret Weston on 14th February, 2020 wrote of George Chaproniere:

On his arrival George was indentured to Lewis Morgan of Kissing Point.

Margaret Weston on 14th February, 2020 wrote of George Chaproniere:

George married again on 13 October 1883, Berrima, Margaret Smith widow of Thomas Smith (Marquis of Hastings (3)).  She was known as Harriet Owen (Henry Wellesley) but on Thomas Smith’s disappearance in 1854 changed her name to Margaret Smith.  Her DC has the two husbands for confirmation.  Margaret died 1900

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Michael Reilly:

ADM 101/72/3 1818-1819
Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s Convict Ship Tyne for 16 July 1818 to 13 January 1819 by Henry Ryan, Surgeon, during which time the said ship was employed in conveying convicts from the Cove of Cork to New South Wales.
Folios 5-7: Michael Reilly, Convict, aged 26; disease or hurt, violent pain in his head with nausea, vomiting, great intolerance of light, pupil dilated. Taken ill, 22 September 1818, at sea. Discharged cured 10 October 1818.

Irish Convict Database.
Michael Reilly, alias Riley, Rielly, age 28, per Tyne 1819; Tried at Dublin City 1817, sentence 7 years. Native of Meath Co. trade- labourer.

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of John Mulligan:

ADM 101/72/3 1818-1819
Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s Convict Ship Tyne for 16 July 1818 to 13 January 1819 by Henry Ryan, Surgeon, during which time the said ship was employed in conveying convicts from the Cove of Cork to New South Wales.
Folios 3-4: John Mulligan, Convict, aged 50; disease or hurt, acute pain in his left side, considerably increased by inspiration. Taken ill, 3 September 1818, at sea. Discharged 10 September 1818.

Irish Convict Database.
John Mulligan, age 47, per Tyne (1819); Tried at Louth, 1817, sentence 14 years. Native of Castleclancy. Trade- Weaver linen.

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Laurence Mcdonald:

ADM 101/72/3 1818-1819
Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s Convict Ship Tyne for 16 July 1818 to 13 January 1819 by Henry Ryan, Surgeon, during which time the said ship was employed in conveying convicts from the Cove of Cork to New South Wales.
Folios 1-3: Laurence McDonnell, Convict, aged 30; disease or hurt, acute pain in the epigastrick region, considerably increased by pressure, belly tense, no stool for three days. Taken ill, 22 August 1818, at sea. Discharged cured 29 August 1818.

Irish Convict Database.
Laurence McDonald, age 25, per Tyne (1819) . Tried at Louth 1817, sentence Life. Native of Louth Co. trade, labourer.

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Owen Ingoldsby:

Additional Comments to the above,  in the Surgeon’s Journal

ADM 101/72/3 1818-1819
Medical and surgical journal of His Majesty’s Convict Ship Tyne for 16 July 1818 to 13 January 1819 by Henry Ryan, Surgeon, during which time the said ship was employed in conveying convicts from the Cove of Cork to New South Wales.

Folio 15: Surgeon’s general remarks. The ship was remarkably healthy, some bowel complaints owing to the change from prison diet of milk and water to the ship’s allowance of beef, bread and vegetables. Attention paid to cleanliness and allowing the convicts on deck every day. Special attention was given to the very old men on board and port wine, Donkins’ Preserved Meat and tea were frequently served to them. Fires were kept on the prison deck and ‘Devils’ burnt. The boys attended a school for one hour every day. The only death on board [Owen Ingoldsby] was a very old and debilitated man who came on board from the hospital. Signed, Harry Ryan, Surgeon and Superintendent, Transport Ship Tyne.

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of William Smith:

Colonial Secretary Index.
SMITH, William. Per “Isabella”, 1822

1823 Dec 3 - On monthly statement of changes in the convicts at Rooty Hill Station; from Prisoners Barracks, Sydney. Listed as per “Elizabeth” (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.245)

1824 Dec - Government servant at Rooty Hill Station. Petition for free passage for his wife Mary & five children (Fiche 3287; 4/1112.1A pp.346-51)

1825 Aug 9 - On monthly statement of changes in the convicts at Rooty Hill Station; to Prisoners Barracks, Parramatta (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.285)

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of William Smith:

SMITH, William. Per “Baring”, 1819

1823 Apr 7 - Re permission to marry Elizabeth Lambert at Parramatta (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.98)

1824 Jan 30 - His wife blind. Petition for ticket of leave (Fiche 3242; 4/1872 p.103). Reply, 5 Feb (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.291)

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Smith:

1828 census at Parramatta. Householder – Thomas Smith.
Thomas Smith, age 51,  per Fortune 1813, Life, shoemaker, protestant.
Mary Smith, age 46, F.S. pers Wanstead 1814, 7 years, wife,
Emma Smith, 10, B.C.  daughter.

Maureen Withey on 14th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas William Smith:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 13 February 2020), September 1818, trial of THOMAS WILLIAM SMITH (t18180909-56).

THOMAS WILLIAM SMITH, Royal Offences > coining offences, 9th September 1818.

1117. THOMAS WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 17th of August , at the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, feloniously did dispose of and put away a certain forged and counterfeited bank note (setting it forth. No. 50,217, 1l. 16th of June, 1818, signed C. Tabor), with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , knowing it to be forged, against the statute .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously offering to William Haynes a like forged bank note with the like intent, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNTS, the same, only calling the forged instrument a promissory note for payment of money, instead of a bank note.

FOUR OTHER COUNTS, the same, only stating the prisoner’s intent to be to defraud the said William Haynes .

WILLIAM HAYNES. I am a linendraper , and live in the Edgware-road . On the 17th of August, about nine o’clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my shop and bought a handkerchief which came to 2s.; he tended to me a 1l. bank note, I looked at it and told him it was a bad one - He said, “here is another,” which I took and requested his address - He said, ” Thomas Williams , No.5, Queen Anne-street.” I had the first note by itself - I wrote the address on the good one; I wrapped the bad one in it, and put both in my pocket (looking at the notes), this is the first he gave me. I put his name on it at the watch-house before I parted with it. This is the second note he gave me.

Q. Did you say any thing to him - A. I told him that having had so many forged notes, I should see if he had given me a right address; he made no objection to it, but went out of the shop towards Queen Anne-street. When we got into Crawford-street, Montague-square, I had not got hold of him, he said he had taken the note at the Green Man and Still, and wished me to go there with him; I said I should go to the first address. He then said he lived in Castle-street, and I must go there with him; I said I would go nowhere till I had been to the first address; but that I thought it very strange that he should prevaricate in that manner, and if he did not choose to go to the first address he had better surrender himself; upon which he ran from me; we were then at the end of Crawford-street - he ran as fast as he could. I attempted to pursue him, but a man ran against me.

Q. Did that appear by accident or design - A. It was designedly, he crossed directly in front of me, saying-“Which is the thief;” he must have seen the prisoner runing before me. I had called out “Stop thief! stop that man.”

Q. Did the man who ran against you knock you down - A. No; I stumbled, and then pursued the prisoner; he was stopped by a soldier and taken to the watch-house, I never lost sight of him. The watch-house-keeper asked him his name-he said it was Thomas William Smith , he was a shoemaker, and lived in Castle-street.

MARY WALKER . I am servant to Mr. Thomas Nixon . On the 17th of August, he lived at No.5, Queen Anne-street, West; the prisoner did not live there. I do no know him-there was no body but me at the house on the 17th of August; my master was out of town.

WILLIAM HAYNES. I do not know any Queen Anne-street, East; he was going towards Queen Anne-street, West.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. Queen Anne-street, West, is now called Foley-place, and has been so for six years. There is no Queen Anne-street, East, now.

JOHN BURGER . I belong to the 2d rigiment of Life Guards. On the 17th of August, I saw Mr. Haynes pursuing the prisoner. I heard the cry of Stop thief! stop the man who is runing - I stopped him.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am an inspector of bank notes, the note is forged in every respect-it is not the Bank plate; the paper and signature are also forged.

CHARLES TABOR . I am a signing clerk to the Bank, the note is not signed by me; there is no other clerk of my name.

(The note produced and read.)

Prisoner’s Defence. The note belonged to a young woman, who gave it to me to take care off; I did not know whether I gave him my note or hers. He said it was bad - They were both folded up together in my pocket; I gave him the other saying, “They might be bad for what I knew.” He said he did not think that was good. I was so terrified I did not know what address I had given, but soon after I recollected. He said I must surrender myself. I was frightened, and ran away.

WILLIAM HAYNES. I remember his giving me the second note - He took the good one out of his left hand breeches-pocket, and the bad one from his right. I have a distinct recollection of it.

MARY ANN DAVIS . I am an unfortunate girl, and live in Cherles-street, Drury-lane. I have known the prisoner above a year and half; he used to come backwards and forwards to me. I do not know where he lived; I can neither read nor write.

Q. Did you give him a note at any time - A. Yes, on this day month; he lent me 4s. till he got it changed. It was a 1l. note.

Q. How do you know that - A. He said so. I received it on Sunday night.

Q. Which of these was it (producing both of them) - A. I cannot tell.

GUILTY . - DEATH . Aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Colonial secretary Index.
SMITH, Thomas. Per “Grenada”, 1819; husband of Mary, formerly Doyle

1823 Jun 4 - Re permission to marry Mary Doyle at Sydney (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.435)

1824 c.Apr, Oct 8 - Shoemaker. Assigned convict mechanic whose master was a defaulter in payment for (Reel 6061, 4/1778 p.265i; Fiche 3293, 5/3821.1 p.6)

1825 May 9 - Servant to George Smith of Cockle Bay, shoemaker. Petition of his wife Mary for Thomas to be assigned to her (Fiche 3252; 4/1875 p.212)

John Andrewartha on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Denis Connell:

His WA Convict number is 2344 | 20years and 5’ 5-3/4”, being single, with light brown hair, and blue eyes.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Neal Smith:

colonial Secretary Index.
SMITH, Neal. Per “Atlas”, Oct 1802; constable at Newcastle, Liverpool and Port Macquarie

1811 Jan 12 - Claiming that his sentence to Newcastle had expired; had applied to be returned to Sydney (Reel 6066; 4/1804 p.54)

1814 May 19 - Discovered illicit still (Reel 6066; 4/1805 p.151)

1814 Aug 6 - Paid from Police Fund for detecting an illicit still at Newcastle (Reel 6038; SZ758 p.516)

1814 Jun 18 -Escorting Mary Hecford to Sydney (Reel 6066; 4/1805 p.153)

1815 Mar 10 - Jailor at Newcastle. Granted permission to proceed to Sydney per “Estramina” for seven days (Reel 6004; 4/3493 p.479)

1815 Mar 15, Dec 13,30 - Proceeding to Sydney (Reel 6066; 4/1805 pp.181b, 203, 205)

1815 Dec 20 - A seven day pass to Sydney approved by the Governor (Reel 6004; 4/3494 p.289)

1821 May 1 - Recommended as constable for Liverpool and Minto (Reel 6051; 4/1749 pp.335-6)

1821 Oct 16 - Constable. Evidence given by (Reel 6051; 4/1750 p.206)

1822 Jan 7 - Paid from the Colonial Fund for apprehending three bushrangers (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.81)

1822 Sep 2 - Entrusted with description of Daniel Quin (Reel 6055; 4/1761 pp.154-5)

1822 Dec 12 - Dismissed as a constable at Lower Minto for gross misconduct (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.117)

1822 Dec 18-1823 Jan 1 - To be transported for four years. In reports of prisoners tried at Court of Criminal Jurisdiction (Reel 6023; X820 p.75)

1823 - Former district constable at Lower Minto; under sentence to Port Macquarie. Petition to be sent to Emu Plains as men he had apprehended were serving at Port Macquarie (Fiche 3053; 4/1832 No.360)

1823 Jan 11 - Re sentence of (Reel 6057; 4/1766 pp.9-10)

1823 Jan 15 - Re punishment for perjury (Reel 6010; 4/3507 p.192)

1823 Feb 11 - On lists of prisoners transported to Port Macquarie per “Lady Nelson”; listed as Smyth (Reel 6019; 4/3864 pp.33, 386-7)

1823 Mar 22 - His wife could not join Smith at Port Macquarie as she had been taken up for misconduct at Liverpool & ordered by the Bench to the Female Factory, Parramatta, for three months as a vagrant (Reel 6068; 4/1815 p.179)

1823 May 10 - Re request by Smith that his wife, in the House of Correction at Parramatta, be allowed to join him at Port Macquarie (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.12). Reply, 13 May (Reel 6010; 4/3508 p.295)

1823 c.Aug - Husband of Mary Maguire; constable at Port Macquarie. Petition that his wife be compelled to join him or be sent to the Female Factory (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.7)

1823 Aug 30 - Request to the Resident Magistrate at Liverpool for an enquiry into & report upon the circum-stances set out in Smith’s petition concerning his wife (Reel 6011; 4/3509 p.156). Reply, 6 Sep (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.22)

1824 Apr 24 - Reporting that his wife Mary was living with a man named Swan at Liverpool (Reel 6069; 4/1817 p.46)

1824 May 28 - His letter requesting that his wife be ordered to join him at Port Macquarie referred to Saxe Bannister, Attorney General (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.330)

1824 May 31 - Saxe Bannister, Attorney General, requiring more information as to Smith’s case (Reel 6060; 4/1777 pp.209a-b). Reply, 5 Jun (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.385)

1824 Jun 7 - Opinion of Attorney General, Saxe Bannister, as to whether Smith could insist that his wife accompany him on his transportation (Reel 6060; 4/1777 pp.210c-d)

1825 Feb 12 - Former constable and gaoler; prisoner at Port Macquarie. Petition to be returned to Sydney (Reel 6069, 4/1817 p.75; Fiche 3252, 4/1875 p.211). Reply, 20 Apr (Reel 6019; 4/3864 p.233)

Irish Convict Database:
Neil Smith, (alias Smyth) tried 1799, at Dublin & Carrick on Shannon. per ship Atlas “II” 1802; an Irish rebel. Notes: NSW 1804 Castle Hill revolt.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of John Smith:

ROYLANCE, Mary

1822 Mar 4 - Re permission to marry John Smith, per “Lord Sidmouth”, at Sydney (Reel 6008; 4/3504A p.514)

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of John Smith:

Colonial Secretary Index.
SMITH, Mary. Of Prince Street; wife of John Smith, per “Lord Sidmouth”, 1819; formerly Mary Roylance (which see also)

1822 Jun 30-1823 Sep 30 - On lists of persons to whom convict mechanics have been assigned (Fiche 3296; X53 pp.21, 34, 50, 65, 80)

1824 c.Apr, Oct 8 - On lists of defaulters in payment for assigned convict mechanics (Reel 6061, 4/1778 p.265i; Fiche 3293, 5/3821.1 p.6)

1824 Apr 28 - On list of individuals to whom bonded mechanics have been assigned (Fiche 3293; 5/3821.1 p.8)

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Smith:

Colonial secretary Index.
SMITH, Joseph. Per “Lord Hungerford”, 1822; prisoner at Port Dalrymple

1823 Jan 25 - Petition for his wife Elizabeth, a convict per “Mary Anne”, to be sent to Port Dalrymple (Fiche 3226; 4/1867 p.78)

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Hartley Smith:

Parramatta Police
Wednesday.
Hartley Smith (Ticket-of-leave) was charged with disorderly conduct exhibited in the gross infraction of certain orders given to him respecting his moral welfare. The offender was an individual whose appearance in connexion with the offence of which he was charged might have caused him to be appellatcd ” a hoary headed old sinner” — but as mankind are in all cases, but partial judges of themselves, Smith considered himself as the beau ideal of a jolly young dog, that the consequence of grey heirs was only to make him a little light-headed, and that the furrows of time on his cheek only bestowed on him rakishness of aspect. Love, the Divine passion, still glowed in his bosom with all the heat of a blacksmith’s forge, and the young and beautiful were the objects of his constant and unremitting attentions. Among the foremost in Hartley’s Book of Beauties of Parramatta stood the young Miss Ballard’s sprigs of a house, not unknown to fame in the Police Records, as each respective member of the family has had a turn in being invited to the Court House Levees; but as the daily exhibition of Smith’ Don-Juan propensities, occasioned by their resorting to his residence, had been made a subject of remark by his neighbours, he was, some time since, it appeared, directed to erase them from his visiting list, and give the cut-direct to their acquaintance, if he would avoid his little amours becoming the subject of magisterial investigation.  Compliance was promised, but who shall control Love ? and particularly on a Sunday evening. On Inspector Fox dropping in at Ballard’s residence, the gay Lothario was discovered revelling in the arms Beauty, sipping Nectar alternately from Miss Ballard’s lips and the mouth of a rum bottle. It is scarcely necessary to add the result — the kisses of Ballard, the angel, had to succumb before the embraces of Fox, the devil, and removal to the watch-house divorced two fond and loving hearts.  I promise on the part of Lothario, that his youthful propensities should, in future, be restrained, and that palpitation of the heart should never again occur, procured his discharge, accompanied with advice from the Bench, that any re-appearance of this dangerous malady, would cause the afflicted to be placed under a course of treatment, in which cold water and brown bread would be the prescribed diet.
The Star and Working Man’s Guardian, (Parramatta) 22 Mar 1845.

The Tickets of Leave of the undermentioned Prisoners of the Crown, have been cancelled for the reasons stated opposite to their respective names,viz:—
Hartley Smith, Marquis of Wellington, Goulburn Bench, indecent assault on a child under 10 years of age.
NSW Govt. Gazette, 9 Mar 1849.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Hartley Smith:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 13 February 2020), February 1814, trial of HARTLEY SMITH (t18140216-6).
HARTLEY SMITH, Theft > theft from a specified place, 16th February 1814.

192. HARTLEY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , four watches; value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Winter , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT WINTER . I am a watchmaker ; my dwelling-house is in Cannon-street, St. George’s in the East .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Hartley Smith - A. Yes, he lived in our house four days. I took him in, and gave him some employment. He came to live with me on the 14th of August; he left me on the 19th.

Q. Did you lose any watches from your shop - A. I went out of town on the 17th of August; I returned in about a week; the prisoner was gone then. I had a letter sent me that he absconded on the 19th with four watches, and when I returned I missed four watches that I had left in my shop when I went away. They were silver watches, worth about three guineas each.

Q. What did your family consist of - A. A housekeeper I left behind me and a son; he is gone to sea now; he was at home then. The housekeeper is here. The watches were pledged, and the tickets sent home in a letter on the 19th. The officer has the watches; he happened to be in the shop at the time the letter came in. The officer has got the property. I took the prisoner in out of charity. I did not expect he would have robbed me. I had no suspicion of the man. I had seen him twice before I employed him.

SARAH UNDERHILL. I am housekeeper to Mr. Winter. On the 14th of August, the prisoner came to our shop to work; he continued to work there until the 19th. Between the hours of seven and eight he came to work on the 19th. I gave the prisoner the watches to hang up. I had the care of the watches, and took them down and hung them up, but being busy I gave them to the prisoner on the 19th to hang them up, about eight o’clock in the morning. There were a great many more watches. Them four were taken down of a night and put into a glass case. I took them into my bed-room of a night. I gave them to him about eight o’clock in the morning; I saw him hang them up. I was in a room adjoining. After he had hung the watches up he went out to breakfast; about ten o’clock he came back; he said he had heard of a situation for Robert Winter , my master’s son, to go to sea; the prisoner wrote a direction for him to go and see the gentleman at Tom’s coffee-house facing the Royal Exchange. He stopped at work until one o’clock, and then he went out to dinner. He never returned. On the Saturday week I saw him at the police office. About two o’clock Mr. Winter’s son came home; I said to him, William is not come back yet. The prisoner had hung up watch-cases in the places where the watches had been. I did not miss the watches until Robert came home; he missed the watches, andthen I missed them. He said he had robbed him; I went to see, and I saw the watches were gone.

Q. How many watches were gone - A. Four. The prisoner never returned.

JOHN BUTLER. I am an officer of Shadwell office. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 5th of this month, at New Prison. He was first taken to Hatton Garden office. On the 19th of August I was at Mr. Winter’s house when a letter came with these four duplitates enclosed. The letter was directed to Mr. Winter.

Q. How came you to go to Mr. Winter’s house - A. I was sent for, and when I was at the house a letter came with the four duplicates of the four watches. The letter bears Sarah Johnson ‘s name; I went to the pawnbrokers, and desired them to stop the watches. The pawnbrokers produced the watches before the magistrate; they are all here; these are the four watches.

JOHN GOTTEN . I am a pawnbroker. A watch was pawned with me on the 19th of August for one pound eleven shillings and sixpence. The watch, I suppose is worth three guineas. I believe this to be the watch. It was pledged in the name of John Johnson . I cannot say it is the watch I received in pawn; the magistrate detained the watch from me; it was such a watch as that.

JOHN WELHAM . I am a pawnbroker. On the 19th of August, a watch was pledged with me. This is the watch I believe; I cannot swear to it. I took account of the number of the watch; the watch is the same number, but the watch having been out of my possession I cannot swear to it. It was pledged in the name of John Johnson . I believe the watch to be worth three pounds ten shillings.

THOMAS JONES . I am an apprentice to Robert Barker , pawnbroker. I believe this to be the watch that was pawned at Mr. Barker’s shop, but I have not had it in my custody ever since I delivered it to the magistrate. The watch was pawned in the name of John Johnson .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker. I received a watch in pledge on the 19th of August. I believe this to be the watch; it has been out of my possession ten days. I cannot possibly swear to it. It is remarkable in the dial plate. I believe it to be the same watch; it has the same name as is upon the ticket. It was pledged for thirty shillings; the value of the watch is about three guineas. I believe the prisoner pledged it. He had the appearance of a gentleman; he was dressed very different to what he is now.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these four watches - A. They are all my property; three of them I made myself. I left them in my shop when I left town. My son took an inventory of all that was in my shop in my presence. I was close by him at the time; the prisoner was close by also.

Q. to Sarah Underhill . Do you know the watches - A. Yes, two of them; they are Mr. Winter’s property. I saw the watches when I gave them the prisoner to hang up in the morning; they were missed about half past two in the afternoon.

Prisoner’s Defence. In the absence of Mr. Winter, my master, before I left him I heard of a situation at Uxbridge that would suit me a great deal better than his, accordingly, as I had a few shillings in my pocket I went, and when I went I had come too soon by a fortnight, and as I had left my master without any warning I did not return. I went to my father. I came up to town about a fortnight since, when I was taken into custody. I never pawned any of these watches.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Colonial Secretary Index.
SMITH, Henry. Per “Marquis of Wellington”, 1815; husband of Mary Ann, nee Davis

1815 Feb 2 - On list of convicts disembarked from the “Marquis of Wellington” and forwarded to Parramatta for distribution; listed as Hartley (Reel 6004; 4/3493 p.436)

1816 Oct 23 - On list of prisoners to be sent to Newcastle per “Elizabeth Henrietta” (Reel 6005; 4/3495 p.225)

1820 Jan - On monthly return of prisoners punished at Newcastle (Reel 6023; 4/1718 p.97)

1822 Feb 4,6 - Re permission to marry Mary Ann Davis at Sydney (Reel 6008; 4/3504A p.398)

1822 Mar, n.d. - Watch and clock maker; servant to Mr Oatley, watchmaker of George Street. Petitions for mitigation of sentence; as Henry Hartley and Hartley Smith (Fiche 3226; 4/1867 pp.79-80)

1823 Apr 18,23 - Son-in-law of Joseph Davis, watchmaker; servant to Mr Oatley, watchmaker. His wife seduced by Mr Oatley; petitioning to be removed from Oatley’s service (Fiche 3235; 4/1870 p.60); refuting his claim which was based on false information (Reel 6058; 4/1771 p.230)

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Ann Bulmer:

Ann Bulmer, (aged 21) single-woman, for stealing from a desk in the room of William Henry Loxdale Eden, Cornet in the First, or Royal Regiment of Dragoons, in the barracks, in the township of Gate Fulford, in the East Riding, one gold watch and white pocket handkerchief, one draft fer 157L 15s. together with some provincial notes, and a small sum of coin in gold and silver. Guilty- Transported for 7 years.
Leeds Intelligence, 5 Aug 1805.

Iris Dunne on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Kirkham:

Conduct Record: Tried 12 March 1833, Transported for Stealing Leather, (Tried in Hobart 4 Dec. 1846 for Forgery, aged 32, Married with 2 children, can Read & Write, Church of England), Ticket of Leave 4 June 1850
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON31-1-26$init=CON31-1-26p113
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON32-1-4$init=CON32-1-4p135
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON37-1-3$init=CON37-1-3p229
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON18-1-20$init=CON18-1-20p105
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON16-1-3$init=CON16-1-3p338

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Mary Burkitt:

Sunday sennight, the following female convicts left York Castle, in order to be delivered on board the transport ship Admiral, lying at Long Reach, near Gravesend; Mary Bellas; Ann Bulmer, Elizabeth Longdon, Margaret Johnson, and Mary Burkitt, to be each transported for the term of seven years.
Lancaster Gazette, 21 Dec 1805.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Margaret Johnson:

Sunday sennight, the following female convicts left York Castle, in order to be delivered on board the transport ship Admiral, lying at Long Reach, near Gravesend; Mary Bellas; Ann Bulmer, Elizabeth Longdon, Margaret Johnson, and Mary Burkitt, to be each transported for the term of seven years.
Lancaster Gazette, 21 Dec 1805.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Longdon:

Sunday sennight, the following female convicts left York Castle, in order to be delivered on board the transport ship Admiral, lying at Long Reach, near Gravesend; Mary Bellas; Ann Bulmer, Elizabeth Longdon, Margaret Johnson, and Mary Burkitt, to be each transported for the term of seven years.
Lancaster Gazette, 21 Dec 1805.

Maureen Withey on 13th February, 2020 wrote of Ann Bulmer:

Sunday sennight, the following female convicts left York Castle, in order to be delivered on board the transport ship Admiral, lying at Long Reach, near Gravesend; Mary Bellas; Ann Bulmer, Elizabeth Longdon, Margaret Johnson, and Mary Burkitt, to be each transported for the term of seven years.
Lancaster Gazette, 21 Dec 1805.

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