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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Iain Frazier on 26th February, 2020 wrote of George Chapman:

George was sentenced to Life at Somerset and sent to (hulk?) YORK at Wells in 1836.

Amanda Uren on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Mary Williams:

Mary Williams (Lady Penrhyn)married William Whiting (Alexander) - 1790 in Sydney, NSW.
Mary died 13/07/1801 - Parramatta, NSW.

Iain Frazier on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Ann Chapman:

As mentioned, there is an Ann in a distant branch of my tree, who may be the Ann considered here.

Details are (all Yorkshire):-
Thomas (Chapman) was born at Laddlegill Hawnby in 1757.  He married Jane (Hildreth/Hildrith) and produced 5children.  He died in Jan 1832 age85? at Hawnby.
Jane (Hildeth/Hildrith) was born at Osmotherley in 1763.  She died in Jan 1832 age69? at Hawnby.
The children were:-
1.Ann who was born at Hawnby on 20 Sep 1790. I know more details of her, she fits our Ann only by the date of her birth.
2.Hannah who was born at hawnby on 26 Dec 1791 & died on 14 Feb 1794 age2 at Hawnby.
3.James who was born at Hawnby on6 Jun 1793 & died on 25 Jul 1794 age11m at Hawnby.
4.James who was born at Hawnby on 8 Apr 1795 & died on 1 Jan 1878 age82 at Pickering Workhouse.  He had produced 3-9children with Ann (Wilkinson).
5.Jane who was born at Hawnby on 23 Jul 1798 & died in 1815? age17? at Deptford Kent.  She had married Thomas (Atkinson).
                              or died on 27 Apr 1872 age73 at Coxwold.  In this version she had married Thomas (Atkinson) & produced 8children.

My tree then goes back to 900s & forward to now.

Jacob Innes has an entry on this Website.

D Wong on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Warhurst:

Lancaster Gazette Lancashire, England
15 Nov 1817:
Committed to our Castle, since our last.— John Eyres, Thomas Warhurst, Daniel Laycock and James Barker, charged with a highway robbery, at Manchester.

Thomas Warhurst was listed as 22 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Hatfield.

Thomas was 5’5½” tall, dark ruddy complexion, brown hair, dark eyes, lost three front teeth in upper jaw.  Scar on left and right side of forehead, scar on left thumb, nail of same disfigured, scar on right side of nose, tattoos, deaf.

27/12/1830: TOL, Liverpool

22/3/1832: COF

Judith Lynette Hamilton on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Edward Glover:

Certificate of Freedom granted 27/12/1848.
Became businessman after freedom granted in Botany& Balmain areas.
Buried Balmain Cemetery.

Maureen Withey on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Charles Campbell:

Charles Campbell had a colonial sentence:
CRIMINAL COURT — (Friday.)
Charles Campbell, tried for a burglary in the house of William Shelley, but found guilty of grand larceny only—seven years transportation.
The Australian (Sydney) 5 Mar 1828.

Maureen Withey on 26th February, 2020 wrote of Edward Paine:

Irish Convict Database
Edward Paine, alias Payne, age 19, Henry Porcher (1) 1825, tried at Kings Co, 1825, Life, native of Tullamore Kings Co. Highway robbery, trade, herdsman reaper. DOB 1806.
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Colonial Secretary Index.

PAINE, Edward. Per “Henry Porcher”, 1825

1825 Dec 9 - On list of convicts landed from the “Henry Porcher” and forwarded to Bathurst for distribution (Reel 6016; 4/3516 p.105)

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Moreton Bay Register of Convicts.
Edward Payne, Per Henry Porcher, tried at King’s Co, 17 Mar 1825, for Highway robbery, sentenced Life, trade- reaper and herd. Colonial sentence- Sydney, 1 Mar 1828, for Simple Grand Larceny, 7 years. To Sydney 25 Jun 1835. Description- native of Kings Co. age 23, 5ft 1 ½. Fair comp. Brown hair, hazle eyes, catholic.
_________________________________________________

CRIMINAL COURT — (Friday.)
Edward Payne, convicted of stealing a saddle, belonging to Mr. Arthur Rankin, at Bathurst—transportation for seven years; and Andrew Gardiner who had been found guilty of receiving the saddle knowing it to have been feloniously acquired, the learned Judge, however, taking into consideration the fair character borne by the prisoner, and circumstances exculpatory in a considerable degree of his offence, transportation for a term of two years.
The Australian (Sydney) 5 Mar 1828.

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Conditional Pardon -
Edward Paine, Henry Porcher (1).
Sydney Morning Herald, 22 May 1848.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James Wiles:

Colonial Secretary Index.

WILES, James. Per “Countess of Harcourt”, 1824

1824 Jul 17 - On list of convicts landed from the “Countess of Harcourt” and forwarded to Minto for distribution (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.653)

1824 Sep 3,10 - On list of prisoners assigned; listed as Wyles (Fiche 3291; 4/4570D p.134)

1825 Mar 8 - Servant of William Elderkine, tailor. Petition for free passage for his wife Isabella and five children (Fiche 3288; 4/1112.1A pp.398-400)

1825 Jul 19 - On return of convicts who have money lodged in the Savings Bank of New South Wales; listed as Wild (Reel 6063; 4/1784 p.295b)

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Wilde:

Memorial Tablet Unveiled
THE LATE JOSEPH WILD
The locality now known as Wilde’s Meadow was discovered by Joseph Wild early in the 19th century. He was employed as a shepherd by Dr. Charles Throsby, ancestor of the Throsby family of Moss Vale, and resided in a hut on a property near Bong Bong. Wild accompanied Dr. Throsby on many explorations, and it is said that he discovered the country later to bear his name, while searching for cattle which had strayed from the Throsby property.
The grave of Joseph Wild is in Bong Bong cemetery, and Rev. S. A. Howard, one of the two honorary district historians, was sponsor of the movement to have a bronze memorial plaque erected over it. He sought the cooperation of residents of Wilde’s Meadow and Mr. F. Watts acted as organising secretary of a committee which provided the plaque.  Mr. F. W. Johnson, a member of the committee, at the unveiling of the plaque said that the late Frank Throsby, just before his death, had agreed that some effort should be made to perpetuate Wild’s memory.  The deeds of ownership of a number of the early properties in the Meadow bore, as the name of the locality, ‘Joe Wild’s Meadow.’ The name later became Wilds Meadow, then Myra Vale, and to-day was known as Wilde’s Meadow.
Mr. F. H. O. Throsby who unveiled the tablet, said that his ancestor. Dr. Charles Throsby, and Wild had been associated on trips of exploration, of which the principal one was the crossing of the Bathurst Flains by way of the Abercrombie Ranges. For his part in this, Wild was granted 100 acres of land which is thought to have been in the vicinity of White’s Creek, Moss Vale. He was said to have been the first man to sight Lake George, while on another trip with Throsby to the Munaro Plains, during which they discovered the site of Canberra. Wild was paid £20 per annum and given rations when he was later appointed an overseer on the construction of the 33ft. road from Picton to Goulburn. The cost of this road, 75 miles in length, was £280 3s. 8d. Subsequently, Wild was appointed a constable for the County of Argyle, which covered an area extending from Mitugong to Lake Bathurst.
Mr. W. J. Little said it was probable that a monument to Wild would be erected close to the scene of his early explorations in Burrawang and Wilde’s Meadow. Following his discovery of the meadow, Wild reported the matter to Dr. Throsby and they viewed it later from Burrawang hill.
Rev. S. A. Howard indicated to those present a small bank of ground near the cemetery on which the original hut occupied by Dr. Throsby was situated, and. on the opposite bank, the place where the hut of Joseph Wild stood.
Joseph Wild was born in 1759, and died on 25th May, 1847, at the age of 88 years.
Southern Mail, 3 June 1949.

Julette Kentish on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Mary Grace:

I have Mary Grace or Grayson, similar details but different husband. Born 1821 Dublin, similar 1822.
Married George cook (also convict) 26/6/1843. Was kitchen maid, sentenced 7yrs stealing boots when 17yo. Free when married, reportedly got 7 yrs but numbers look reduced sentence if free from time of marriage vs sentence.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Witherington:

Colonial Secretary Index.

WITHERINGTON, Elizabeth. Per “Minstrel”, 1812; wife of Matthew Wild

1823 Aug 26,29 - Re permission to marry Matthew Wylds [Wild] at Campbelltown (Reel 6011; 4/3509 p.144)
1823 Oct 6 - Of Airds. Petition for mitigation of sentence of her husband Matthew Wild (Fiche 3237; 4/1870 p.97)
1825 Oct 7 - Affidavit re destruction of her certificate of freedom by fire in Oct 1819 (Reel 6027; 4/1716.2 pp.173-4)
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Matthew Wild was a convict on Mangles, 1820.

—————————————————————————-
Colonial Secretary Index.
WILD, Matthew. Per “Mangles”, 1820; husband of Elizabeth Witherington

1821 Sep 8 - Employed on the roads. On list of all persons victualled from H.M. Magazines; listed as Wylde (Reel 6016; 4/5781 p.78)
1823 Aug 26,29 - Re permission to marry Elizabeth Witherington at Campbelltown; listed as Wylds (Reel 6011; 4/3509 p.144)
1823 Oct 6 - Servant to Daniel McDonald of Airds. Petition for mitigation of his sentence by his wife Elizabeth (Fiche 3237; 4/1870 p.97)
1824 c.Apr, Oct 8 - Shoemaker. Assigned convict mechanic whose master was a defaulter in payment for (Reel 6061, 4/1778 p.265f; Fiche 3293, 5/3821.1 p.4)
1824 Apr 28 -Shoemaker. On return of bonded mechanics (Fiche 3293; 5/3821.1 p.8)
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Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Solomon Wiseman:

Solomon Wiseman was a journeyman lighterman working on the river Thames when he was convited at the Old Bailey 30 October 1805, for stealing timber, and sentenced to Death, later commuted to transportation for Life.
Trial at the Old Bailey: https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18051030-55-defend624&div=t18051030-55#highlight
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Colonial Secretary Index:

WISEMAN, Solomon. Per “Alexander”, 1806; ticket of leave, Jun 1810; absolute pardon, Feb 1812; merchant and shipowner; landholder, Hawkesbury River
1810 Sep 1 - Juror at inquest on John Brown held at Sydney (Reel 6021; 4/1819 pp.51-2)
1811 Oct 14; 1817 Aug 16 - Mariner; owner of “Hawkesbury Packet”. Bonds to Naval Officer (Fiche 3283, X702 pp.55-7; Fiche 3284, X702 pp.131-3)
1813 Aug 7 - Of Bligh Street. On list of persons holding licences for sale of wine & spirituous liquors (Reel 6038; SZ758 pp.405-7)
1815 Apr 1; 1816 Apr 6 - On list of persons licensed as publicans; for 1815 & 1816 at Sydney (Reel 6038; SZ759 pp.54, 192)
1815 Dec 7 - Seeking permission to cut own cedar for trading (Reel 6045; 4/1733 p.117). Reply, 11 Dec (Reel 6004; 4/3494 p.281)
1816 Jan 31 - Re dispatch of “Hawkesbury Packet” to Newcastle with wheat (Reel 6004; 4/3494 p.332)
1816 Oct 31 - Seeking permission to bring cedar from Port Stephens (Reel 6046; 4/1736 pp.158-9). Reply, 31 Oct (Reel 6005; 4/3495 p.240)
1816 Nov 9 - Vessel of engaged to import cargo of cedar from Port Stephens (Reel 6046; 4/1736 p.157)
1817 May 31 - Petition for permission to proceed per “Hope” with provisions for his men at Port Stephens (Reel 6047; 4/1739 p.208)
1817 Jun 20 - Engaged by Riley and Jones to procure cedar from Port Stephens in “Harriet” (Reel 6047; 4/1739 pp.221-3)
1817 Jul 23 - Two men from his vessel murdered by Aborigines at Port Stephen (Reel 6005; 4/3496 p.254)
1817 Jul 24 - Re permission to procure a remaining quantity of cedar at Port Stephens (Reel 6047; 4/1739 p.228)
1817 Aug 3 - Petition for permission to return to Port Stephens for cedar remaining there; ship lost while procuring cedar for Riley and Jones (Reel 6047; 4/1739 pp.231-2)
1818 Sep 10 - Of Sydney. On list of persons to receive grants of land in 1818 (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.44)
1819 Mar 19 - Master, “Mary”. Accused of taking two cedar logs from Newcastle (Reel 6067; 4/1807 pp.15-6)
1819 Nov 22 - Petition to import cedar from Newcastle to build house (Reel 6020; 2/8130 p.421). Replies, 22 Nov [includes coy of petition] and 24 Nov (Reel 6007; 4/3501 pp.64, 66)
1820 Oct 24 - Re charge of fraudulent practices between Wiseman and Government blacksmith at Newcastle in making iron goods for sale (Reel 6050; 4/1747 pp.219-21)
1820 Nov 8 - Asking permission to bring 600 feet of cedar from Newcastle (Reel 6051; 4/1749 p.230). Reply, 10 Nov (Reel 6007; 4/3502 p.411)
1820 Nov 14 - Seeking permission to bring from Newcastle in own vessel 600 feet of cedar to complete buildings on his farm (Reel 6050; 4/1747 pp.243-4)
1820 Nov 24-1821 May 24 - Store receipts of for maize and wheat (Reel 6049, 4/1745 p.354; Reel 6051, 4/1748 pp.136, 172)
1821 Apr 9 - Permission to procure cedar at Port Stevens (Reel 6007; 4/3503 p.218)
1824 Jan 6 - Convicts landed from “Medina” assigned to at Windsor (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.133)
1825 Nov - On list of persons who have received orders for grants of land (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.104); on list of lands granted and reserved by Sir Thomas Brisbane (Fiche 3269; 9/2740 p.32)
1825 Nov 3 - Landowner in the district of Castlereagh. Certifying landholding in district of Castlereagh (Fiche 3162; 4/1844C No.875 pp.1439-40)
1825 Nov 4 - To be victualled from the Store at Sydney for six months; with his six children and two convict servants (Reel 6015; 4/3515 p.528)
—————————————————————————
Death - On Friday last, after a lingering illness, which she
bore with much fortitude and resignation, Mrs. Wiseman, wife of Mr. Solomon Wiseman, a settler on the Banks of the Hawkesbury. She was much respected.
Sydney Gazette, 28 July 1821

—————————————————————————
Death. On the 28th instant, at his residence, Lower Portland Head, in the sixty-second year of his age, Mr Solomon Wiseman, for many years an old and respectable Colonist; he was a man truly loved for his hospitality; in him the poor have lost a friend. He has left a widow and large family to deplore his loss.
Sydney Herald, 30 Nov 1838

—————————————————————————
Wiseman, Solomon (1777–1838)

by Vivienne Parsons

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 2, (MUP), 1967

Solomon Wiseman (1777-1838), merchant, born on 16 April 1777 in Essex, England, was a journeyman lighterman when convicted at the Old Bailey on 30 October 1805 of stealing from his employers 704 lbs (319 kg) of Brazil wood from a Thames lighter. His death sentence was commuted to transportation for life, and in August 1806 he arrived in New South Wales in the Alexander with his wife Jane, née Middleton, and two sons. In June 1810 he received a ticket-of-leave and in February 1812 an absolute pardon. In July 1811 the sloop Hawkesbury Packet, built for Wiseman, was launched at Cockle Bay; with it he entered the coastal trade and later added the sloop Hope. In December 1815 he was one of the merchants who petitioned Governor Lachlan Macquarie for permission to visit parts of the coast for cedar and coal to sell in Sydney; their request was refused, but during the next two years he received permission to bring cedar from Port Stephens on his own behalf and for other merchants. In July 1817 the Hope was wrecked at Port Stephens and two of the crew were killed by Aboriginals; two months later the Hawkesbury Packet was also wrecked.

In August 1813 Wiseman had received a wine and spirits licence for premises in Bligh Street, Sydney. In 1817 he had agreed to sell them to Samuel Terry; after the wrecks he had to assign his property to Terry. Soon afterwards he was granted 100 acres (40 ha) which he selected on the Hawkesbury River near Wilberforce. He then acquired the Mary Ann which the government chartered in 1821 to go to Port Macquarie. In 1823 he received a further grant of 200 acres (81 ha) near Benjamin Singleton’s Mill Farm and in 1828 held 1100 acres (450 ha), acquired by grant and purchase. In 1826 he obtained a licence for his house on the road to Newcastle. Next year he was given a lease of what became known as Wiseman’s Ferry on the Hawkesbury River on condition that government horses and property were carried on it free of charge. Richard Jones took this over in 1827. Like many other officials Wiseman was accused of corruption and of contravening port orders, but there is no evidence that these complaints were justified. In his last years he became well known for his hospitality and in May 1833 entertained the governor.

His wife Jane had died on 20 July 1821 after a long illness, leaving him with four sons and two daughters. On 1 November 1826 he married Sophia Warner, the widow of one of his employees at Wilberforce. He died on 28 November 1838, described as a respected colonist and friend of the poor. He was buried with his first wife on his property, reinterred first in the Church of St Mary Magdalene, and after that church was damaged by vandals, in the cemetery at Wiseman’s Ferry. Sophia Wiseman returned to England in 1841 and died at Hammersmith in 1870.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James Ewens:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gang which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

Henry Jupp,  Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too.
James Jupp was also onboard, but may have died on the journey. No records found of him in NSW.
No ship for Thomas Philpot.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.

Listed as James EWENS but I think he was James EVANS - date of conviction is the same as the above convicts and native place is also the same.

James was listed as 33 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Shipley, Sussex.

James was 5’7½” tall, dark sallow complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes.

8/12/1831: TOL Airds.  TOL is listed as EWENS.

Possible death: NSW BDM - 1861 James Ewens, aged 76, died Sugar Loaf, District of Campbelltown, NSW.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Daniel Rapley:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gang which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

Henry Jupp,  Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too.
James Jupp was also onboard, but may have died on the journey. No records found of him in NSW.
No ship for Thomas Philpot.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.

Daniel Rapley was listed as 22 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Shipley, Sussex.

Daniel awas 5’6¾” tall, fair ruddy complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes.

27/6/1827: TOL Sydney Bench.

10/5/1834: TOL in lieu of TOL 1827.

10/7/1834: CP.

No marriage or children found on the NSW BDM - Possible death 1859, aged 63 years, Sydney.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Blakeney:

IN THE 8UPREME COURT OF NEW
SOUTH WALES.
ICCLE8IABTICAL JURISDICTION.
In the Goods of Patrick Blakeney late of Sydney in the oolony of New South Wales Carossa, Butcher deceased intestate.
NOTICE is hereby given that Margaret Blakeney of Richmond in the colony of New South Wales, widow intends after the expiration of fourteen days from the publication hereof to apply to this Honorable Court in its Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction that letters of administration of the goods chattels credits and effects of the said Patrick Blakeney deceased intestate may be granted to her as the widow of the said deceased. Dated this second day of April A.D. 1851.
LITTLE AND YEOMANS, Proctors for the said Administratrix,  120, King-street, Sydney.
Sydney ~Morning Herald, 4 Apr 1851.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Blakeney:

DIED
On the 22nd instant, after a few days’ illness, Mr Patrick Blakeney, butcher, Hunter-street, Sydney, aged 36 years.

FUNERAL
THE friends of the late Mr Patrick Blakeney are requested to attend his funeral, to move from his late residence, Hunter-street, To-morrow, Wednesday morning, at 8 o’clock.
Sydney Morning Herald, 23 July 1850.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James (junr.) Nye:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gang which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

Henry Jupp,  Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too.
James Jupp was also onboard, but may have died on the journey. No records found of him in NSW.
No ship for Thomas Philpot.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.

James Nye Jnr. was listed as 28 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Shipley, Sussex.

James was 5’5½” tall, dark complexion, brown hair, grey eyes

27/6/1827: TOL Liverpool Bench.
Allowed to remain in the district of Argyle.

1830: Married Ann McDonnell (1803-7/7/1873) at Church of England Berrima; Bong Bong; Sutton Forest; All Saints (Co. Camden)
Children:
Emily Nye 1830–1849
James Nye 1831–1902
George Nye 1833–1924
Hannah Nye 1834–1854
Ann Nye 1836–1849
Maria Nye 1838–1902
Thomas Nye 1842–1909
Mary Nye 1842–1910
Amira Nye 1844–1844
Eliza Nye 1846–1857

1/9/1832: TOL in lieu of TOL 1827.

31/12/1836: COF

16/8/1874: James Nye Jnr. died at Sutton Forest, NSW.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James (senior) Nye:

18/8/1825: Permission to Marry Catherine Kelly (Mariner 1825) she was 30 and on bond, James listed as 45?? and on Bond.

1826: Married at St. Phillips, Sydney.

24/12/1827: Catherine Nye (Mariner 1825) permission to marry Benjamin Baker (Hercules 1825) he was 22 and on bond - Catherine was 30 and on bond - Disallowed.

1828: Married at St. John’s, Parramatta.
No children listed.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Leahey:

The Convict Indentures states that Patrick Leahey is 35 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status married and 5 children and a native of Kilkenny.  He ploughs and reaps.  He was convicted of highway robbery (Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Warrants), although on Indentures stealing butter! at Kilkenny on 27 March 1828 and sentenced to life.  He had 2 prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 5 1/2 inches; complexion ruddy; hair brown and eyes dark hazel.  Transport number 128.
Assigned to Mr James Thorp, Sydney
Received Conditional Pardon on 30 January 1847.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Lemey:

The Convict Indentures states that Thomas Lemey is 46 years old.  He could read and write; religion Catholic; status married with 3 children and a native of Tipperary.  He was a butcher.  He was convicted of sheep stealing at Cork on 29 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 1/2 inches; complexion ruddy; hair dark brown to grey and eyes grey.  Transport number 103.
Assigned to Mr Thomas Hills, Lower Windsor.
Received ticket of leave on 10 July 1834 at Castle Hill.  Government Gazette Wednesday 16 July 1834. Received Certificate of Freedom in 1835.  Government Gazette Wednesday 10 June 1835.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of John Barry:

The Convict Indentures states that John Barry is 25 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Cork City.  He was a carman.  He was convicted of stealing clothes at Cork on 31 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 3 inches; complexion dark ruddy and freckled; hair black and eyes hazel.  Transport number 73.
Assigned to Woolloomooloo Road Party.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Barry:

The Convict Indentures states that Thomas Barry is 22 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of London.  He was a farm labourer.  He was convicted of pig stealing at Tipperary on 1 April 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 2 inches; complexion ruddy and freckled; hair black and eyes hazel.  Transport number 25.
Assigned to Mr Everingham, Port Head.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Daniel Hyland:

The Convict Indentures states that Daniel Hyland is 70 years old. [Record comment next to this age says doubtful.]  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status married and 5 children and a native of Tipperary.  He ploughs and reaps.  He was convicted of house stealing at Cork City on 5 April 1828 and sentenced to life.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 6 1/2 inches; complexion ruddy; hair brown to grey, bald and eyes grey.  Transport number 176.
Assigned to Mr George Bowman, Picton.  Name is blurred.
Received ticket of leave in 1837 (number 37/205).

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Denis Higgins:

The Convict Indentures states that Denis Higgins 42 years old.  He could read and write; religion Catholic; status married and 5 children and a native of Cork.  He was a shepherd.  He was convicted of sheep stealing at City Cork on 1 April 1828 and sentenced to life.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 7 1/2 inches; complexion dark ruddy; hair brown to grey and eyes grey.  Transport number 68.
Assigned to Director of Pit North.
Received ticket of leave in 1837 (number 37/534).

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Charles Holmes:

The Convict Indentures states that Charles Holmes is 18 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of City Cork.  He was a weaving boy.  He was convicted of robbing a person at Tipperary on 29 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 3 inches; complexion sallow; hair brown and eyes hazel.  Transport number 21.
Assigned to Mr John Deakson, Sydney.

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