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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

Goal: 100 500 1,500 3,310 5,000 10,000 New Convicts

A big thanks to everyone who contributed a convict - we reached our original target of 100 new convicts in less than a month, and have had an amazing 7,292 new convicts added in total!

If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 28,820 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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By contributing you will bring the community a step closer to a goal of 50,000 contributions. We currently have 32,848 contributions.

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Recent Submissions

Renate E Griffin on 17th June, 2019 wrote of William Martin:

I believe William’s last name was Marlin, not Martin. Looking at the handwritten record (scanned and viewed on ancestry.com record attached to William Marlin born about 1801), the letter l in the last name is not crossed. The handwriting has crossed t’s in other names but not on William’s entry, making me think the name is Marlin, not Martin. Thank you.

D Wong on 16th June, 2019 wrote of Ralph Carpenter:

Berkshire Chronicle Berkshire, England
24 Feb 1849:
BERKS LENT ASSIZES
Ralph Carpenter, 24, charged with having, on the 16th October, broken into the dwelling house of Henry James Sylvester, and stolen one ham, one chine, &c., his property.  He also stands charged with having, on the 9th December, 1846, broken out of the gaol at Abingdon.

Ralph Carpenter was listed as 28 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Kemble, Wiltshire.

Ralph was literate, single, 5’2½” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, single.

Father: Thomas
Mother: Sabrina
Brothers: Thomas, Edward, Alfred.
Sister: Eliza, London.

22/6/1852: Was a constable.

16/9/1852: Permission to marry Bridget Ryan (free).

16/11/1852: Married Bridget Ryan, 19 at St. Peters, Hamilton.  Ralph listed as 23 and a constable.
Children:
31/8/1853-1928: James b Bothwell
10/8/1854-1939: Eliza b Bothwell
1856-1935: Annie b Parramatta, NSW
1858-1889: Richard
1860-1942: Alfred Thomas b Liverpool NSW
1862-1943: Edward Thomas Owell b Liverpool, NSW
1864-1949: Margaret Sabina
1866-3-/12/1871: Amelia, buried at Marulan Cemetery, NSW in an unmarked grave, 5 years old.
1868-1954: Ralph
1871-1903: Frederick Charles
1873-????: Alice Mary.
All other children registered in Goulburn.

11/12/1853: TOL
31/10/1854: CP

17/11/1910: Ralph Carpenter died aged 86.  Death registered at Goulburn, NSW.

21/11/1910 The Daily Telegraph, sydney:
GOULBURN, Saturday.
Mr. Ralph Carpenter, a resident of the city for about 45 years, died on Thursday at East-grove, at the age Of 86 years.

Bridget died 1904 at Goulburn.

D Wong on 16th June, 2019 wrote of George Smallcombe:

Morning Post London, England
6 Jan 1844:
PLYMOUTH, Jan. 4.__Last evening about eight o’clock, three persons, a man and two women, were apprehended at a house in Cambridge-lane, in this town, charged with having been concerned in the burglary early that morning on the premises of Mr. R. Hicks wine and spirit merchant, in Bilbury-street, Plymouth, when 65l 16s. was carried off, an account of which was sent you yesterday.  These persons gave their names as George Smallcombe, Caroline Smallcombe, his wife, and Caroline Bannister ; and in the room in which they were taken there was found by the police, among other things, a carpet bag, apparently nearly new, containing twenty-four skeleton keys and picklocks. 

Samuel Griffiths and William Jones were later charged along with them. -
William Jones, George Smallcombe and Samuel Griffiths were sentenced to 15 years transportation.

All were on board the ‘Barossa’.

George Smallcombe was listed as 22 years old on arrival.
Place of Birth: near devizes, Wiltshire.

George was 5’7” tall, illiterate, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, small scar on left eyebrow, several small scars on neck and breast, single, protestant.

Occupation: Rough Mason.

“I lived with Caroline Johns 2 years ; she came to gaol with me; was tried and acquitted for the same offence.

Mother: Sarah
Brothers: James, Stephen, at Bristol.

26/12/1848: Hospital.
9/1/1849: Lunatic Asylum.

5/3/1862: In Lunatic Asylum, New Norfolk.

20/1/1885: Health & Welfare: George Smallcombe, aged 62 - Received from the Hospital for the Insane, New Norfolk, under the Government order of detention.
4/2/1885: Admtted into the New Norfolk Institution from the General Hospital, Hobart, under medical certification.
Is paralyzed on right side and has a deformed foot on left leg from an injury received 40 years ago, he says, a cart wheel having crushed the foot on the instep of which is apparently an incurrable sore.
11/2/1885: In bed complaining of cold, and pain in injured limb.
15/2/1885: Is unable to get up.
18/2/1885: Remained in an unconscious state, gradually sinking and died this morning of brain disease - Serons Apoplexy.

Rhonda Wenninger on 16th June, 2019 wrote of William Sly:

William Sly married Sophia Westbrook on 19 Mar 1844 at Richmond, New South Wales, and had thirteen children.

D Wong on 16th June, 2019 wrote of Jonathan Smith:

Jonathan Smith was listed as 25 years old on arrival in VDL.
Native Place: Liverpool.

Father and mother near Chester - #### & 4 Ch. at 20 New Street, Liverpool.

Jonathan was 5’10” tall, light brown hair, dark blue eyes, blind right eye, scar on left cheek, pockpitted.

Gavin D Thompson on 16th June, 2019 wrote of James Case:

Birthdate derived from age given at death.
He was married 15 July 1816 at Broad Chalke, Wiltshire to Ann Moxem and six births are recorded:
Henry, 8 Aug 1817; Elias, 8 Jun 1819; Jane, 1 Dec 1821; George, 23 May 1825; Josiah, 3 Jan 1830; Henry, 13 Jul 1831. These are baptismal dates recorded at Broad Chalke. After James’ transportation, Ann had another son, William, 25 Dec 1835, father not named but probably George Blick, whom she subsequently married 31 Jan 1849.
James received a Free Pardon (No. 302) on 3 Feb 1836 and he died at the General Hospital, Hobart on 4 May 1867.

Greg Petersen on 16th June, 2019 wrote of Jonathan Smith:

1821 conduct record reads:
Gaol report: “A very bad character and a terror to the neighbourhood”
Hulk report: “Orderly”
Confirmed F & M near Chester, W & 4 Ch at New street Liverpool.

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of James Kelly:

James Kelly was 36 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Cork.

James was 5’7” tall, slender build, dark hair, hazel eyes, sandy whiskers, pock marked, has lost left eye tooth.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
KELLY, James. Per “Southworth”, 1822

1823 Aug 1: On lists of prisoners transported to Port Macquarie per “Sally” (Reel 6019; 4/3864 pp.62, 414-5)

7/5/1828: COF

Ryan Dudley on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Robert Marjoram:

Baptised at Bredfield, Suffolk, England on 18 June 1785.

Married (2nd) Frances “Fanny” Crow(e) at Ufford, Suffolk, England on 12 October 1814.

Returned to England. Immigrated with wife Fanny to NSW on board “Marchioness of Londonderry” (Unassisted Immigrants) arriving 16 August 1853.

Greg Petersen on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Henry Rouse:

Henry Rouse (Garrett) left an account of John Price’s death when, on 26th March 1857, Price (whom Rouse/ Garrett called “The Demon”)visited Williamstown to investigate complaints about rations by convicts who were brought from the Success to Gellibrand Point:
“Both gangs knew he had been sent for and were on the watch for his appearance. His fate had already been decided. Several of the men knew what waited them aboard - the Ringbolt, Gag and Bludgeon and flung back into the president (another Hulk moored beside Success) during his pleasure. Death was preference….Death for them was an escape from misery. Their intention had been to lure Price into a tent and hang him over a ridge pole but it did not quite work out that way.
The whole quarry of 100 men knew what was going to be done, saw the rope and knew its purpose. All were not to take part but all approved. But out of that 100 surely there is one traitor who for a hope of pardon will warn and save him? not one.
According to Rouse the men began shouting on Price’s arrival, showing him the mouldy bread they were forced to eat and then began pushing him towards the tent. The officers who were meant to be guarding him abandoned him. By this time Price clearly knew what was happening and managed to run up an embankment, but a stone hit him and when he fell the mob was all over him”.

Greg Petersen on 15th June, 2019 wrote of George Strong:

1845, 2nd August, convicted for Burglary at Somerset Special Assizes.
description: Age: 30 years, Height: 5’ 5¼ “, Complexion: pale, Hair: Brown, Face: oval,
Eyes: Hazel, Mouth: Large
Prison report: First conviction light, stated this offence Burglary, caught in the house.
While assigned to the Hulk “Success”, George Strong met with severe punishments at the hands of John Price “The Demon”. Note from “the History of the Hulk Success”:
The first Inspector-General of Penal Establishments in Victoria was Mr. Samuel Barrow. He, from the first, had condemned the lack of accommodation on board the prison hulks, and his first report contained a proposal to build an immense gaol on the radiating plan, to accommodate
one thousand prisoners, at a cost of ;f20o,ooo, but the enormous amount required made the proposal impracticable. Mr. Barrow was drowned in Hobson’s Bay (Williamstown, Victoria), and Mr. John Price, who was living in retirement in a picturesque part of Tasmania at the time, was asked to take control in the year 1854. He was the son of Sir Rose Price, a Cornish baronet, and was married to a niece of the late Sir John Franklin. He is supposed to have been the original of the character of ” Maurice Frere,” in Marcus Clarke’s stirring novel, ” For the Term of his Natural Life,” Just as Melville is supposed to have been the original of the character of ” Rufus Dawes ” in the same work. The new Inspector had been Chief Commandant at Van Dieman’s Land, and also Commandant at Norfolk Island, succeeding
Major Childs. He knew the faces of the ” old timers ” at a glance, and they knew him as the ” Demon of the Ocean.” John Price was at that time in the prime of life, and a man of fine physique. He was a born leader of men, and struck terror into the hearts of the rebellious ruffians with whom he had to deal. But long life amongst the convicts seemed to have steeled his heart against them as a class, and he may be said to have
demanded rather than have won their respect. Major De W , who visited the ’ Success ” Exhibition in London, and who was acquainted with Price intimately, describes him as ” that kind of man that you would say at first sight you would much rather dine or shake hands
with than fight.”

The new Commandant of the hulks boasted that he always went
unarmed among the convicts, who, in their turn, recognised that in him
they were dealing with a man who would not hesitate to sacrifice his own, life rather than be “bested,” as he was wont to express it. At Norfolk
Island he ordered George Strong, alias ’ Dubbo,” fifty lashes for refusing to work. The convict still resolutely refused, and stated his intention of ’ not soiling his hands in future.” He was ordered fifty lashes more, which punishment was repeated as often as he refused, till the doctor
was obliged to interfere in order to save the prisoner’s life. ” Dubbo ” on recovering, still persisting in his obstinacy, a large grindstone was then placed in the gaol yard, with handles on each side, by which it was turned by a willing convict, and ” Dubbo’s” hand was fastened to the opposite handle, causing it to revolve with every turn. The Commandant, John Price, happening to pass, observed to the convict that he was not such a pebble as people seemed to think, but “Dubbo” very coolly reminded him that it was the gentleman on the other side that was doing all the work.’
John Price was later Surrounded and attacked and battered to death on the shore at Williamstown by by convicts from the “Success”, seven were subsequently hanged for the murder. Another convict, Henry Rouse aka “Codrington Revingston”, “Henry Beresford Garrett”, witnessed the event and later wrote about it in his memoirs.

Stephen Atkins on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Uriah Ando:

Uriah’s wife (nee Eleanor Marsh) married Solomon Whitcomb in Bristol on 22 Aug 1836 - presumably after securing a divorce from Uriah.

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of George Birchenough:

Chester Chronicle Cheshire, England
21 Aug 1840:
CHESHIRE ASSIZES
HOUSEBREAKING.
George Hayes, 22, and George Birchenough, 21, were indicted for breaking into the dwelling-house of James Bracegirdle, of Macclesfield, on the 14th of March, and stealing a quantity of money and silver plate.  The latter prisoner pleaded guilty.

George Hayes was also onboard the ‘Duncan’.

George Birchenough was listed as 24 years old on arrival in VDL.
Native Place: Macclesfield.

1841 Census: Widowed mother and 3 brothers living in village outside Macclesfield.  Mother was dead by 1851 or remarried.

George was 5’3” tall, brown hair, light brown thin whiskers, grey eyes, dark complexion, 13 dots on right arm, literate, C of E.

Mother: Charlotte
Brothers: Joseph, James, Thomas, William, David.
Sisters: Charlotte, Sally, Mary Ann.

20/4/1847: TOL
11/12/1849: CP

20/1/1852: George Buchenough, Steerage passenger from Hobart to Melbourne per ‘Goldseeker’.

1855: Married Frances Watts in Victoria.
Children:
1857: Edward George b Prahran.
1858: Emma Charlotte b Prahran. (Died 4/12/1944, aged 86, Minneola, Goodhue County, Minnesota, USA.
1861: John Lowe b Emerald Hill.
1865: Martha Ann b Emerald Hill.

Frances Watts/Birchenough died 6/2/1911, aged 82 at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, USA and was buried at the Redwood Falls Cemetery.

George died in 1886. (Family website).

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Thomas Birchenough:

Western Times Devon, England
3 Sep 1836:
At the Chester Assizes, Louisa Plant, aged seventeen, and Thomas Birchenough aged twenty-two years, were tried on the charge of murdering Edward Plant, the infant child of Louisa Plant by the male prisoner.  It was proved that the woman suffered great distress in consequence of the man refusing to give her anything for the support of the child.  Several witnesses stated, that when the female prisoner asked the man for money, he beat her, and treated her in a cruel manner.  On some of those occasions after Birchenough had left the house, the female prisoner had been observed to take up the child and sitting with it on her knee, exclaim__"I have nothing but trouble of mind ; if the Lord would take my baby, never, never, would I go in that man’s company any more.  If it had only a pennyworth of arsenic it would be gone.”
After that, the witnesses said she went to bed, lamenting very much.  At another time she said to Mrs. Burrowes the person with whom she lodges, that she had seen a girl who had a child which was very poorly, and who told her that if she would give her child what the girl and given to her’s she would soon get shut of it.  It appeared that she gave arsenic to her baby, being herself almost distracted, and caused its death.
It was proved that Birchenough was an accessory to the murder, but not a principal ; and he was acquitted.  After Louisa Plant had been found guilty, he was tried and convicted of being an accessory.  The woman was most strongly recommended to mercy by the Jury, in consideration of her youth and the influence under which she acted ; and Lord Denman only directed sentence of death to be recorded against her, intimating that it would be commuted.
Birchenough was sentenced to be hanged.

No ship found for Louisa Plant.

Ancestry Convict Records state his crime as ‘Kidnapping’.

Thomas Birchenough was 23 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Cheshire.

(Possible brother, George, arrived VDL per ‘Duncan’ 1841).

Thomas could read, was protest, single, 5’2¼” tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair and eyes, small scar over left eyebrow, scar under left eye, scar back of left thumb, TB on upper right arm.

1845: TOL, Goulburn.

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Mary Daley:

Mary Daley was listed as 20 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Cork County.

Mary was illiterate, Roman Catholic, single, 5’3½” tall, ruddy little pockpitted and freckled complexion, light brown hair, blue eyes, little fingers of both hands crooked, scar back of little finger of left.

Occupation: Laundress/All work.

15/2/1836: Permission to marry James Thomas (Agamemnon) he was 22 with a TOL, Mary was 22 and on bond.

1836: Married in the Presbyterian Church, in the district of Derbie; Hunter District; Maitland; Morpeth; Paterson; Singleton.

They had 7 children, 5 boys and 2 girls.

1839: TOL, Maitland.

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Thomas West:

THOMAS WEST, JAMES STEEL.
Theft: pocketpicking.
17th August 1835
Verdict Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
Sentence Transportation
THOMAS WEST and JAMES STEEL were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Tell, from his person.

JAMES WILD (police-constable R 141.) I was on duty at Eltam in plain clothes on the 23rd of July—I saw the two prisoners sound seveal gentlemen’s pockets—they at last went behind the prosecutor, and West took this handkerchief from his pocket, and passed it to the other—I took Steel, and found this handkerchief and another silk handkerchief on him.

RICHARD TELL. I was at Eltham. I was told my handkerchief was gone—I turned and saw Steel, who was putting it under his cost—this is it.

West. Q. You said you could not swear to that handkerchief? A. I had one exactly like it—I missed it, and saw Steel putting it into his cost.

WILLIAM TOOKEY (police-constable L 148.) I was on duty—I saw West run away, and I took him—I did not see the handkerchief found on Steel.

(The prisoner Steel put in a written defence, stating that the handkerchief found on him was his own, and that the other prisoner was a stranger to him.)

WEST— GUILTY. Aged 41.

STEEL— GUILTY. Aged 19.
Transported for Seven Years.

James Steel arrived NSW per ‘Recovery’ 1836.

Thomas West was 42 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Bristol.

Thomas was literate, protestant, a widower, no children listed, 4’10½” tall, dark sallow complexion, dark brown mixed with grey hair, chestnut eyes, front upper teeth decaying, perpendicular scar left side upper lip, scar over inner corner of left eyebrow, small mole centre of breast, scar back of fourth finger left and, anchor inside lower right arm.

Occupation: Ship’s cook and steward.

20/8/1842: COF

Greg Petersen on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Henry Rouse:

1885, 3rd September, Died i Terrace Gaol, Wellington New Zealand of Bronchitis.

BRETT FROST on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Mary Daley:

death 18 sep 1886 kiandra nsw

Suzie Buttigieg on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Christopher O' Hara:

Married Mary Ann Agnes ( Marianne) Cousens in 1843 at Dulwich, NSW and had 5 children. He died in Muswellbrook, NSW.

BRETT FROST on 15th June, 2019 wrote of James Thomas:

born 26 june 1794 Bramham Yorkshire.
death april 1861 kiandra nsw

Heather Galley on 15th June, 2019 wrote of Michael Clune:

My research indicates he married Margaret Quealy (nee Corry)in 1856 and moved to Glen Innes NSW where he dies in 1891.Some records show surname as Cluen

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of James Steel:

THOMAS WEST, JAMES STEEL.
Theft: pocketpicking.
17th August 1835
Verdict Guilty > unknown; Guilty > unknown
Sentence Transportation
THOMAS WEST and JAMES STEEL were indicted for stealing, on the 23rd of July, 1 handkerchief, value 2s. 6d., the goods of Richard Tell, from his person.

JAMES WILD (police-constable R 141.) I was on duty at Eltam in plain clothes on the 23rd of July—I saw the two prisoners sound seveal gentlemen’s pockets—they at last went behind the prosecutor, and West took this handkerchief from his pocket, and passed it to the other—I took Steel, and found this handkerchief and another silk handkerchief on him.

RICHARD TELL. I was at Eltham. I was told my handkerchief was gone—I turned and saw Steel, who was putting it under his cost—this is it.

West. Q. You said you could not swear to that handkerchief? A. I had one exactly like it—I missed it, and saw Steel putting it into his cost.

WILLIAM TOOKEY (police-constable L 148.) I was on duty—I saw West run away, and I took him—I did not see the handkerchief found on Steel.

(The prisoner Steel put in a written defence, stating that the handkerchief found on him was his own, and that the other prisoner was a stranger to him.)

WEST— GUILTY. Aged 41.

STEEL— GUILTY. Aged 19.
Transported for Seven Years.

Thomas West arrived per ‘Strathfieldsaye 1836’.

James Steel was 20 years old on arrival.
Native Place: London.

James was illiterate, protestant, single, 5’5¼” tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, lost two front upper teeth, blue spot on back of right wrist, two scars back of forefinger right hand, W R, crown, J M on upper, four blue dots back of lower left arm, and two dots and two scars on same hand.

1840: TOL, Bathurst.

D Wong on 15th June, 2019 wrote of William Abbott:

William was illiterate, protestant, single, 5’6¾” tall, ruddy complexion, light brown hair, light hazel eyes, mole right side of forehead, ditto back of neck, MC back of left hand, W A BEA back of right hand, scar left shin.

Occupations: blacksmith/anchorsmith

D Wong on 14th June, 2019 wrote of Hugh Loughrey:

Hugh Loughrey was 29 years old on arrival, 5’5” tall, blue eyes, flaxen hair, fresh complexion, very well (in the comments section).
Native Place: Londonderry.

Hugh was married to Mary Ann Mcloughlin and he had 2 children.
Daughter Mary Martha Loughrey arrived in NSW 19/6/1853 per the ‘John Fielden’.
Hugh had applied for his wife and 2 children to come to Australia at the expense of the Gov. but no record of his wife arriving.

Assigned to James Williams, Parramatta.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
LOUGHERY, Hugh. Per “Medina”, 1823

1824 Jan 6: On list of convicts landed from the “Medina” and forwarded to Parramatta for distribution (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.131)

1824 Apr 10: On list of prisoners on establishment at Bathurst with sentences not transmitted (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.103)

1824 Jul 31-1825 Dec 31: Stockman at Crooked Corner. On lists of men on the Government Stock Establishment at Bathurst; listed as Lochry (Reel 6031; 4/7029A pp.140-359)

D Wong on 14th June, 2019 wrote of Thomas Bolton:

Thomas Bolton was 21 years old on arrival.
Born: Stone, Kent.

Thomas was 5’5” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, no whiskers, light hazel eyes, married, reads on board.

Wife: Mary at native place.
Mother: Sarah at native place.
Brothers: William, George, James, Henry.

22/2/1848: TOL
30/7/1850: CP

15/8/1853: Married Bridget O’Brien, 18, at the Parish Church, Swansea, both made their marks.  Thomas was listed as Bolten and he was 27 years old.
Children were all born at Spring Bay.
Thomas was listed as a Labourer and later as a farmer.
Children:
BOLTON SARAH 1857
BOLTON BRIDGET 1859
BOLTON MARY ANN 1861
BOLTON ELIZABETH 1863
BOLTON DANIEL 1865
BOLTON JAMES 1869
BOLTON HENRY 1869
BOLTON HONORA 1871
BOLTON WILLIAM JOHN 1874

6/2/1896: Thomas died of heart disease at Spring Bay, aged 75 - listed as a farmer.

Bridget died C 1/1/1906 - she made a will dated 3/12/1905 - left a farm of 84½ acres to James and Henry, money to her daughter and daughter-in-law.

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