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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Nell Murphy on 5th January, 2019 wrote of John Ballinger:

John BALLINGER was convicted at the CCCourt, London on 5 July 1841 for burglary and stealing tools and other items. Previously convicted. Life sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Isabella’ 1842.

Aged 27 yrs.

(N.B. There are two John Ballinger’s transported to VDL about this time)

VDL:
Details upon arrival - trade, a whitesmith, aged 29 yrs, 5’4 3/4” height, dark complexion, dark brown hair, dark brown eyes, can read & write, Protestant.
Native place of birth: Kensington, England.
Mother: Martha, living at Carnaby Street, London.

2 and half yrs Probation Period.
1842: at Westbury
1845: at Launceston
30 April 1850: Ticket of Leave granted.
21 June 1853: Conditional Pardon approved.

Nell Murphy on 5th January, 2019 wrote of Mary Jones:

Mary Ann JONES was convicted at Lancaster, England on 23 Oct 1827 for stealing money and linen.  14 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Borneo’ arriving 1828.

Single woman. Aged 20 yrs. House servant. 5’4” height. Had lived as a servant at Salford, Enland.
Native place of family - Liverpool. Two sisters who live at Liverpool.

VDL:
Work services in the Colony.

30 April 1830: Application for permission to marry - Thomas Ballinger (per ‘Commodore Hayes’) to Mary Ann JONES (per ‘Borneo).  ref. 45/1/1

15 June 1830: Marriage - Thomas BALLINGER, bachelor to Mary Ann JONES, Spinster, Convict - at Hobart Town. ref. 36/1/1 no. 1417.

Nell Murphy on 5th January, 2019 wrote of Thomas Ballinger:

Thomas BALLINGER was convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery, London on on 23 Oct 1822 for stealing a copper (from a wash house). 7 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Commodore Hayes’ arriving 1823.

Aged 19 yrs. Single man.
Father & mother live in John St. Tottenham. Father a carpenter.

VDL:
Assigned to work service
Several notes of minor misconduct.

30 April 1830: Application for permission to marry - Thomas Ballinger (per ‘Commodore Hayes’) to Mary Ann JONES (per ‘Borneo).  ref. 45/1/1

15 June 1830: Marriage - Thomas BALLINGER, bachelor to Mary Ann JONES, Spinster, Convict - at Hobart Town. ref. 36/1/1 no. 1417.

There is a departure listed from Launceston to Melbourne in 1852 but would need further research to see if this man.  He is listed as “free” but could mean free by servitude.

D Wong on 5th January, 2019 wrote of John Sumption:

16/4/18242 Bristol Mirror Bristol, England:
John Richards, 24, John Sumption, 22, and Julia Edwards, 22, were charged with having a mould in their possession for counterfeiting half-crowns.

The Jury retired, and after an absence of about an hour, returned into Court with a verdict of Gilty against Sumption and Edwards, but acquitted Richards.

The three prisoners were then, along with Joseph Gerred, charged, Sumption and Richards with stealing, and Gerred and Edwlards with receiving a piece of cotton print, the property of Messrs. Wintles.

The evidence was defective against Richards, Gerred, and Edwards, who were acquitted; Sumption was found Guilty.

John Sumption was 23 years old on arrival in VDL.
Native Place: Reading, Berkshire.

John was 5’4½” tall, fresh complexion, reddish hair, brown whiskers, hazel eyes, pockpitted, scar on left hand, scar on knuckle forefinger left hand, small scar on 3rd and 4th fingers left hand, literate, single.

Mother: Jane at native place.
Brothers: James, Charles.
Sisters: Susannah, Betty.

1/1/1847: TOL
22/6/1849: Free Certificate.

29/12/1851: Steerage passenger, Launceston to Melbourne, per ‘City of Melbourne’.  Free by Servitude.  Listed as ‘Somption’.

9/8/1861: Was at Chewton, Victoria.

S Boz on 4th January, 2019 wrote of William Goodall:

Profile at http://www.wikitree.com, Goodall-863

Amelia Alice Guillet on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Sarah Smith:

I believe she was born in 1800 on December the 13th at Walworth in Surrey

D Wong on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Henry Cane:

8/12/1837 Nottingham Journal Nottinghamshire, England:

Henry Cane was committed by the same Magistrate and W. B. Martin. Esq. to the said Gaol, for trial at the same Sessions, for having feloniously stolen an ewe sheep, belonging to Samuel Taylor, of Bulcote.

Ancestry Convict Indents - Listed as Henry CAIN. (Also on NSW Gov. Convict Records).

Henry was 34 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Nottingham.

Occupation: Frame work knitter.

Henry was literate, protestant, married with 5 male and 2 female children, 5’3” tall, dark sallow complexion, dark brown hair, dark grey eyes, scrofula marks on both sides of neck and throat, has an impediment in his speech.

1845: TOL, Port Macquarie.

1/6/1849: CP

D Wong on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Thomas Gutteridge:

Old Bailey:
MACDONALD SMITH, THOMAS GUTTER-IDGE, SOPHIA MEYERS, MARY TURTON.
Theft: burglary.
17th September 1817
Verdict Not Guilty; Not Guilty; Guilty > lesser offence
Sentence Death; Death

Macdonald Smith was also on board the ‘Isabella’.

Thomas Gutteridge was 20 years old on arrival - he was 5’1” tall, fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes.

Occupation: Bricklayer’s labourer.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
GUTTERIDGE, Thomas. Per “Isabella”, 1818

1819 Mar 5:  On list of convicts embarked on “Prince Leopold” for the public service in Van Diemen’s Land (Reel 6006; 4/3500 p.27).

9/6/1821 Hobart Town Gazette:
John Morell and Thomas Gutteridge were arraigned on a charge of stealing from the dwelling-house of one William Whyte, at Norfolk Plains, certain goods of the value of 40s. and putting in bodily fear of their lives, William Price and William Lawson therein.
Also, with stealing from the dwelling house of Charles Reed, goods above the value of 40s.
Also, with making an assault on, and maliciously shooting at, and wounding one Cinnamon Wilkinson, a private in His Majesty’s 48th regiment of Foot, with a loaded musket, against the form of the Statute, &c.
William Price was first called, and stated, that about the 10th of March last, three men, bush-rangers, came to their master’s stock-yard and hut, about ten o’clock in the morning ; two of them had a musket each, and the third man a horse pistol ; they ordered them into the hut, and to cook for them ; they remained about an hour;—that while there he looked at them, and that the two prisoners were two of the men ; they demanded muskets and dogs ; they took away three kangaroo dogs, some meat, a tomahawk, &c. ; that when they were about to leave, they forced himself and Lawson to go with them,to shew them Reed’s place, about three miles off, as they wanted a musket that was there ; that when they came near Reed’s, the bush-rangers made himself and Lawson sit down, having tied their hinds behind them ; that two of them went to the hut, while the third remained sentry over them, with the pistol in his hand ; that some bed-clothes were brought back, and he was then untied, and ordered to go home, leaving Lawson with them, who several times called the prisoner Morell by his name, while they were together; that he believed the iron pot, tomahawk, &c. produced, to be the same that had been taken on the occasion from Whyte’s, and that pistol was like that Gutteridge, the prisoner, had.
The trial continued….
three soldiers had been sent in pursuit of the bushrangers, one of the soldiers was shot…...,

Thomas Gutteridge was found Guilty ; and John Morell Guilty of the first and second charges in the information exhibited against them.

Morell being called on whether he wished to say any thing in his defence,said, ” that he had nothing to say, but that bad usage drove him into the bush; that he had no cloths, or any thing.”

Gutteridge said, ” I went into the bush, because I was accused of stealing a fowl.”

On Saturday forenoon, the 19th instant, the following prisoners, viz. William Hyder, Patrick Kane, Thomas Watson, George O’Neil, John Griffiths, Daniel McCarthy, James Norris, William Lloyd, Robert Gilliard, Edward McCracken, Thomas Philips, John Morell and Thomas Gutteridge, were placed in the dock, and called on by the court, what they, or either of them, had o say why sentence of death should not be passed upon them to die according to law. No answer was made by the unhappy men…...

Before his Excellency the Governor-in-Chief left Launceston, on Monday, the 28th of May last, we find, that the fatal warrants had been delivered to the Provost Marshal, for the execution
at Launceston, of Kane, Lloyd, Gilliard, McCarthy and Morrell, on the following Wednesday, as also, for the execution at George Town, on Monday, the 3d of June following, of Hyder, Norris, McCracken and Gutteridge :—the sentence against the other capital convicts having been commuted by His Excellency, the Governor-in-Chief, to transportation for life.

3/6/1821: Executed.

D Wong on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Catherine Nugent:

Catherine Nugent was 20 years old on arrival.
Native place: Dublin.

Catherine was single, 5’1¾” tall, fair ruddy and pockpitted complexion, light brown hair, grey eyes.

Assigned to James Thompson, Cumberland Street, Sydney.

There are 2 entries on Ancestry Convict Indents for Catherine Nugent:
2nd entry: Felony, Ribbons, 7 years, aged 24, 4’11”, brown hair, grey eyes, fair complexion, tried Dublin City. (Only 1 Catherine Nugent on the Lady Rowena).

22/12/1831: Permission to marry McDonald Smith (Isabella 1818).  He was listed as 33, with a TOL - Catherine was 25 and on bond. No registration found.

23/4/1832: Certificate of Freedom.

D Wong on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Macdonald Smith:

Old Bailey:
MACDONALD SMITH, THOMAS GUTTER-IDGE, SOPHIA MEYERS, MARY TURTON.
Theft: burglary.
17th September 1817
Verdict Not Guilty; Not Guilty; Guilty > lesser offence
Sentence Death; Death

MACDONALD SMITH, THOMAS GUTTER-IDGE, SOPHIA MEYERS, and MARY TURTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Smith, about two in the night of the 13th of July, with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three spoons, value 1l.; one glass,value 1s.; 6lbs. of bacon, value 2s.; 26 shirts, value 2l.; three shifts, value 3s.; seven petticoats, value 7s.; three frocks, value 3s.; one habit-shirt, value 1s.; one veil, value 2s.; one pair of trowsers, value 6d.; eight handkerchiefs, value 5s.; one apron, value 6d.; two bed-gowns, value 1s., eight caps, value 2s.; one pocket,value 6d.; four pinafores, value 2s.; and five pair of stockings, value 5s., his property; one hat, value 2s., the goods of William Fry ; and one tea-caddy, value 2s. , the goods of Mary Ann Hill.

MR. THOMAS SMITH. I keep an academy at Gordon House, Kentish-town, in the parish of St.Pancras.

ELIZA BELL. I am servant to Mr. Thomas Smith On the 13th of July I went to bed between ten and eleven o’clock, and secured the back and front doors; I did not look at the windows; I was the last up. About three o’clock in the morning, I was alarmed by my fellow-servant, she was up before me. I went down below, and found the shoe-room window, which looks into the backyard, open-it was day-light; I missed the articles stated in the indictment out of the laundry, which communicates with the shoe-room. I had seen them safe the night before.

MR. THOMAS SMITH re-examined. The house appeared to have been entered by putting the sash of the shoe-room window down; I observed it at three o’clock in the morning. I do not know whether it was fastened the overnight or not; there were no marks of violence on it. There is a private bolt, which goes across the laundry-door-it goes by the kitchen-door, through the wall, into the laundry-door; it is impossible for any one to enter the laundry without getting the bolt out. I found the crossbolt on the ground in the kitchen-the kitchen and laundry-doors were open, and one of the back-doors, which goes out of the laundry. We were not alarmed till the servants came down in the morning to wash. Mr. Fry is one of my assistants. All the things were taken out of the laundry. The property was worth four or five pounds at the lowest.

NEHEMIAH SMITH. On the 13th of July, between four and five o’clock in morning, I was coming-from Kentish-town to Covent-garden-market, and met Mr. Smith’s son, he told me if I met the prisoner (he described Macdonald Smith), to apprehend him; about half-past seven o’clock, as I returned from Covent-garden, I met the prisoners, Gutteridge and Smith, at the end of Pancras-street, Tottenham-court-road, each of them had a bundle - I stopped my cart, got down, and asked Smith what he had got in the bundle? he said he had his clothes. I told him they were stolen, and he was my prisoner, and I must apprehend him. He attempted to run away; I overtook. and secured him with the bundle. Gutteridge ran away with his bundle. As I was taking him to the watch-house, I met Squib. We took him to a public-house, and took two silver table-spoons, one tea-spoon, a knife, a rummer, and the hat-lining from his pocket.

GEORGE SQUI. I am the watch-house-keeper. On the 13th of July, I was in Tottenham-court-road about half-past seven o’clock in the morning; I saw a crowd at the end of Pancras-street, I went up, and found Smith had the prisoner, Macdonald Smith, in custody, with a bundle - I took charge of him, and as soon as I got hold of him he shifted about, as if he wanted to get rid of something. I took him to a public-house, and found two table-spoons and one tea-spoon in his breeches-pocket, and a glass and a hat lining in his coat-pocket.

JAMES LEGGAT. I am a tailor. On the 13th of July, I was returning from the city to Kentish-town about half-past seven o’clock in the morning, and met the prisoners, Smith and Gutteridge, with each a bundle in their arms, and Smith had a hat in his hand - I knew nothing of the robbery - They passed me and walked on-when I got to Kentish-town I met the officer, Smith, he gave me information - I told him what I had seen and went in pursuit of the prisoners, we met Mr. Nehemiah Smith who said he had taken one; I returned to the public-house and could not find Gutteridge; the prisoner, Smith, told us at the watchhouse where to find the bundle - I went to a field at the back of Mr. Smith’s house, and found a bundle secreted in a hollow tree as he had directed us, it was not either of the bundles which I had seen on the prisoners before.

WILLIAM JEFFERSON. I am an officer. From information which I received, I went to No. 1, New-street, St. Giles’s, and found the prisoner, Gutteridge, there, he had a hat on his head and a handkerchief in it-there was another hat on the chair, and an empty bag in his pocket-there were two hats in the room - I asked him which was his, he said the one he had on - I took him to the office, leaving Morris in the room - I returned again and found the prisoner, Turton, there; and while I was searching the room the prisoner, Meyers, came in; Morris searched her and took a duplicate from her; and found a child’s spencer, a pair of stockings, and an handkerchief in a box which Turton said was her box; I told her what I was looking for, she said she had no more of the property, I asked her what she had done with it, she said she sold it to a woman at a public-house-door, and she did not know who she was - I asked her what she had done with the money she said she bought some bacon and greens; I afterwards heard some bacon had been stolen from Mr. Smith’s, I went back to the lodgings and brought the bacon away, and found a pair of shoes and gaiters in the room which the prisoner, Smith, said were his; as Meyers was being searched she took the duplicate out and put it on the table.

BENJAMIN MORRIS. On the 14th of July, I went with Jefferson to No. 1, New-street, St. Giles’s, and apprehended Gutteridge there - I staid there while Jefferson took him to the office-the two female prisoners came in - I found a duplicate in Meyers’s hand - She said it was for a shirt which she had pledged.

JOHN MURRAY. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner, Meyers, pledged a boy’s shirt, for 2s.6d., at our house on the 13th of July.

WILLIAM FRY. I am assistant to Mr. Smith. I missed my hat the same morning - I am certain all was safe the overnight in the passage-the lining of the hat is mine, the hat found is also mine, the lining is cut out of it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

GUTTERIDGE’S Defence. I was going to work and found them in the fields.

SMITH’S Defence. It is as he has said, I gave the shirt to Meyers thinking it belonged to Gutteridge.

SMITH - GUILTY. - DEATH. Aged 19.
GUTTERIDGE - GUILTY. - DEATH. Aged 19.
MEYERS- NOT GUILTY.
TURTON- NOT GUILTY.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of the burglary .
Recommended to mercy.

Thomas Gutteridge was also on board the ‘Isabella’.

MacDonald Smith was the son of Thomas Smith and Sarah Homans.

Colonial Secretary Papers:
SMITH, Macdonald. Per “Isabella”, 1818
1825 Feb 8:  On list of prisoners in the service of John Wylde; from Feb 1823 (Reel 6063; 4/1785 p.94).

1826 Census: A bullock driver for J. J. Moore of Monaro Plains.

1827: TOL
1832: TOL, Argyle.

22/12/1831: Permission to marry Catherine Nugent (Lady Rowena 1826). (No record found on the NSW BDM).

21/11/1835: CP

6/6/1836: Married Emma Ann Allen at Cobbitty, NSW.

28/5/1874: McDonald Smith died at Springrove Farm, Spring Vale, now Millthorpe, NSW.

Leanne Grogan on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Thomas Wiggins:

Proceedings of the Old Bailey, 10th September 1823, page 91.

1193. THOMAS WIGGINS was indicted for stealing, on the 29th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d., the goods of Abraham Luck , from the person of Martha Luck .

MARTHA LUCK , a child, twelve years of age, not appearing to understand the nature of an oath, was not examined.

ABRAHAM LUCK . I am father of Martha Luck , and live in Charlotte-mews, Bloomsbury. I know nothing of this circumstance.

DANIEL HONE . I am headborough of St. Giles’s. On the 29th of July, about five o’clock in the afternoon, I heard the cry of Stop thief! in Castle-street, opposite my own door - I immediately looked out, and saw the prisoner running with a handkerchief in his hand; he ran about thirty yards, then threw it down, and the little girl ran to pick it up. I saw the prisoner stopped, and only lost sight of him as he turned the corner - he was the only person running. I brought him back to where the girl had picked the handkerchief up. She said in his presence that she had it loose round her neck, with her hand on it, and he took it off - he said he picked it up.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

Prisoner’s Defence. I was in Museum-street, and saw it on the ground; I picked it up, and heard the cry of Stop thief! dropped it, and ran to see where the thief was.

GUILTY . Aged 18.
Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 03 January 2019), September 1823, trial of THOMAS WIGGINS (t18230910-224).

Thomas Wiggins was born about 1805 in England. He was transported to Van Diemen’s Land, departing England on 29 Mar 1824 and arriving in what is now known as Tasmania on 21 Jul 1824 to Hobart Town.

On 31 October 1832 he was given permission to married Helen (Ellen) Lawrence. They married on 25 February 1833 when he was 28 years old. He had the occupation of Fisherman after his marriage.

Thomas and Helen (Ellen) had the following children:
1] Mary WIGGINS (1837-1896)
2] Thomas WIGGINS (1839-)
3] Edward WIGGINS (1842-)
4] Margaret WIGGINS (1845-)
5] William WIGGINS (1848-)

Nell Murphy on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of John Fordham:

John FORDHAM was convicted at Middlesex Gaol Delivery, London on 18 Feb 1830 for embezzlement. Not known to the Courts before.  Orderly.  Single man. 14 yr sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania), Australia per the ship ‘Southworth’ arriving there 19 Oct 1830.

Assigned to work duties in the Colony.
20 April 1831: Assigned to Mr. Raynor. Charged with embezzling 1.6.8.  Further 7 yrs added to sentence.
1832 - a baker at Prison Barracks. Bake cakes contrary to orders. 25 lashes.
7 Dec 1833: Stealing from Patrick Duffy on the King’s Highway.  Not Guilty.

5 June 1841: Application for permission to marry - Agnes HALL (per Westmorland) to John FORDHAM (per Southworth).  (ref. 52/1/2 pg 55)

MARRIAGE: 3 Aug 1841 - Agnes HALL, aged 25 yrs, Ticket of Leave, spinster to John FORDHAM aged 30yrs, Ticket of Leave, Baker,  at St. Luke’s Parish Church, Campbell Town, district of Avoca, VDL. (ref. 37/1/2 no. 1276)

7 Oct 1842: Conditional Pardon approved (no. 825).

15 Oct 1845: John & Agnes FORDAM left VDL for Sydney, Australia per the ship “Shamrock”.  (ref. 549904)

Nell Murphy on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Agnes Hall:

Agnes HALL was convicted at Edinburgh, Scotland on 15 March 1836 for theft - repeat habit. Had been imprisoned before.Life Sentence. Transported to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Westmorland’ arriving there 3 Dec 1836.

Note: Her name is also recorded as “Stewartson”.

VDL:
Assigned to work duties. 8 Feb 1837 - absent without leave. Sent to Female Factory to work at hard labour on the wash tubs.

2 March 1839: Application for permission to marry - Anges HALL (per Westmorland) to Francis WILLIAMSON (per England).  (ref. 52/1/1 pg 224)
Does not appear to have proceeded.

1840: at Campbell Town, midlands of VDL.
23 March 1841: Ticket of Leave granted.

5 June 1841: Application for permission to marry - Agnes HALL (per Westmorland) to John FORDHAM (per Southworth).  (ref. 52/1/2 pg 55)

MARRIAGE: 3 Aug 1841 - Agnes HALL, aged 25 yrs, Ticket of Leave, spinster to John FORDHAM aged 30yrs, Ticket of Leave, Baker,  at St. Luke’s Parish Church, Campbell Town, district of Avoca, VDL. (ref. 37/1/2 no. 1276)

15 Oct 1845: John & Agnes FORDAM left VDL for Sydney, Australia per the ship “Shamrock”.  (ref. 549904)

Nell Murphy on 3rd January, 2019 wrote of Johannah Henessey:

Johanna HENNESSY was convicted at Bristol, England on 4 Jan 1836 for stealing shirts. Gaol report: “bad character & convicted before”. 7 yr transportation sentence - sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ship ‘Westmorland’ arriving there 3 Dec.

Johanna was admitted to the H.M. Colonial Hospital, Hobart and died there 23 June 1837. (ref. Convict Conduct Record)

Dean Gledden on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of Josiah Hayes:

Had a partnership with Lucy Payne (nee Goodsell) resulting in 2 children Susan Goodsell Hayes and Harriet Goodsell Hayes.

D Wong on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of James Ramsdale:

16/10/1839 Staffordshire Gazette and County Standard Staffordshire, England:
James Ramsdale, indicted for stealing three fowls, the property of Josiah Hand, at Botteslow.  Transported for seven years.

James Ramsdale was listed as 24 years old on arrival in VDL.
Native Place: West Houghton.

James was 5’4¼” tall, single, illiterate, fresh complexion, black hair and small black whiskers, black eyes, scar on left arm, 2 scars on left thumb.

1846: Free Certificate.

19/10/1846: Passenger per ‘Agenoria’ from Hobart to Port Albert, Victoria.

D Wong on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of Thomas Meacham:

16/10/1839 Staffordshire Gazette and County Standard Staffordshire, England:

STAFFORDSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS
Thomas and James Meacham were charged with stealing eight bushels of oats, the property of Joseph Adams, the township of Curborough and Elmhurst. Guilty. Thomas to be transported for 10 years, and James for seven years.

No ship found for James Meacham.

Sick List of the Maitland 1840:
Folio 3: Thomas Meachem, aged 35, prisoner; sick or hurt, ophthalmia from a wound of the eye; put on sick list 14 June 1840, discharged 8 July 1840 with the loss of sight in one eye.

Thomas Meacham was listed as 31 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Staffordshire.

Thomas was literate, protestant, married with 1 male and 2 female children, 5’5¾” tall, dark sallow and slightly pockpitted, black hair, brown eyes, eyebrows meeting, lost two front upper teeth small dark mole on left side of throat, two inside lower right arm.

Listed as ‘Meachan’ and ‘Meacham’ on NSW Gov. Convict Records.
1/3/1851: CP

D Wong on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of James Mclean:

National Records of Scotland
Title Precognition against James McLean for the crime of theft by housebreaking at Old Assembly Close, Edinburgh
Dates 1839

Accused James McLean, bookbinder, Address: Conn’s Close, Edinburgh.

Trial Papers:
James McLean, Verdict: Guilty, Sentence: Transportation - 7 years Previous convictions: theft - Edinburgh Police Court, 31 May 1838.

James McLean was 20 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Inverness.

Occupation: Bookbinder.

James was literate, protestant, single, 5’4” tall, fair ruddy complexion, brown hair, grey eyes, three scars on forehead, nose a little cocked, two scars back of forefinger of left hand.

1845: TOL, Queanbeyan
25/11/l1847: COF

D Wong on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of William Johnston:

National Records of Scotland
Title Trial papers relating to Mary Ferguson, William Johnston, Daniel McKenzie for the crime of theft by housebreaking. Tried at High Court, Glasgow
Dates 4 May 1839

Accused Mary Ferguson, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession - theft, Sentence: Imprisonment - 12 months with hard labour. Note: Pannel pleaded not guilty to housebreaking, and the Advocate Depute passed from this charge. Pannel to serve sentence in the Bridewell of Glasgow.
William Johnston, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession, Sentence: Transportation - 7 years
Daniel McKenzie, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession, Sentence: Transportation - 7 years Previous convictions: theft

Daniel McKenzie was also on board the ‘Maitland’.

D Wong on 2nd January, 2019 wrote of Daniel Mckenzie:

National Records of Scotland
Title Trial papers relating to Mary Ferguson, William Johnston, Daniel McKenzie for the crime of theft by housebreaking. Tried at High Court, Glasgow
Dates 4 May 1839

Accused Mary Ferguson, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession - theft, Sentence: Imprisonment - 12 months with hard labour. Note: Pannel pleaded not guilty to housebreaking, and the Advocate Depute passed from this charge. Pannel to serve sentence in the Bridewell of Glasgow.
William Johnston, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession, Sentence: Transportation - 7 years
Daniel McKenzie, Verdict: Guilty, Verdict Comments: Guilty in terms of own confession, Sentence: Transportation - 7 years Previous convictions: theft

William Johnston was also on board the ‘Maitland’.

Daniel McKenzie was 20 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Edinburgh.

Daniel was literate, Presbyterian, single, 5’5½” tall, sallow complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, nose a little cocked, blue spot under inner corner of left eyebrow, head diseased, mark of a boil on right elbow, scar back of middle finger of right hand, two scars on right knee.

No records found.

Penny Gordon on 1st January, 2019 wrote of Michael Fitzpatrick:

Certificate of Freedom issued 9 August 1831 - description given as:
Height: 5 feet 7 inches
Complexion: fair, sallow
Hair: light brown
Eyes: brown

D Wong on 1st January, 2019 wrote of Hall Parcel:

Hall Parcel/Purcell/Pysell or William Hall etc., was 24 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Holywell near Royston.

Transported for ‘Obtaining potatoes under false pretences.

Goal Report: Been twice before in custody, character very bad.

Previous convictions: Stealing trees, 6 months in Cambridge, went for the name of Taylor.

Hall was 5’6½” tall, dark brown hair and eyes, mole on right eyebrow, married, wife and 2 children at Essingfield.
Father and Mother at Holywell near Royston, a Farmer.

19/1/1828 The Hobart Town Courier:
Free Certificate granted - Hall Parcel alias Passell, Phoenix.

Colonial Convictions:
16/4/1828 at Hobart Town, 7 years for stealing a gun, value £5, the property of George Meredith Esq. __Guilty.

4/12/1833 - Stealing a colt, a filly and a foal - Death recorded, life.
5/8/1834 - Trafficking in the Port Barracks - Death commuted to Life.

1830-32: Assigned to Public Works.
1833 Muster: Assigned to Mr. Guest.
1835 Muster: Transported to Port Arthur.

1843: Was ordered a TOL but not to reside in the Brighton district.

10/2/1843: TOL

D Wong on 1st January, 2019 wrote of Michael Fitzpatrick:

From his Indent per Ancestry:
Michael Fitzpatrick was 20 years old on arrival.  He was 5’6” tall, fair complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes, very well on arrival - assigned to ‘Harper’, area unreadable.

From his COF per Ancestry:
9/8/1831: 5’7” tall, fair sallow complexion, light brown hair, brown eyes, specks on right, hairy mole on right cheek, scar betwixt thumb and forefinger of left hand.

Nell Murphy on 1st January, 2019 wrote of George Powell:

Albert Powell on 1st January 2019 wrote of George Powell:

Clara 11 second voyage

His record already exists.

Elizabeth Yewers on 1st January, 2019 wrote of John Benjamin Hawkins:

John Benjamin Hawkins’ daughter Margaret ‘Grace’ Hawkins married the son of another John Somes exile from 1947, James Joseph Pine (1864-1912) son of Joseph Pine.

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