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Recent Submissions

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Daniel Hanlan:

The Convict Indentures states that Daniel Hanlon is 23 years old.  He could read and write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of City Cork.  He was a clerk.  He was convicted of forgery at Cork on 6 April 1828 and sentenced to life.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 5 inches; complexion ruddy; hair brown and eyes grey.  Transport number 81.
Assigned to Mr William Carper, Hunter’s River.
Received ticket of leave in 1843 (number 43/492).  Received Conditional Pardon on 3 February 1847 (number 48/492).

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James (senior) Nye:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gang which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

Henry Jupp,  Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too.
James Jupp was also onboard, but may have died on the journey. No records found of him in NSW.
No ship for Thomas Philpot.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.

James Nye Snr. was listed as 48 years old on arrival. Birth dates of 1767, 1770, 1773 listed.

Native Place: Shipley.

James was 5’6” tall, fair sallow complexion, grey hair, hazel eyes.

11/8/1825: TOL Liverpool. Listed as a farming man.
1827: NSW BDM - James Nye died aged 60.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James Jupp:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gaing which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

Henry Jupp,  Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too. 
No ship for Thomas Philpot.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.

There are no records for James Jupp.
Ancestry Convict Indents list his nae but no details, NSW Gov. Convict Records show no listing for James Jupp.

Four convicts died on the voyage..perhaps James was one of them.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Henry Jupp:

Daniel Rapley, James Nye, Snr. and Jnr. were all on board.
James Evans has been listed as EWENS, and he was on board too.

Patrick Blakeney on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Blakeney:

Great granddaughter dawn tuckey

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of William Vessey:

Nottingham Review and General Advertiser for the Midland Counties Nottinghamshire, England
10 Apr 1840

WILLIAM VESSEY, aged 20, to stealing on the 13th of February last, from the person of Henrietta, the wife of John Clarke, a silk bag, a baby’s cap, and other articles, the property of the said John Clarke.  Transported for ten years.

William Vessey was listed as 22 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Derby, Derbyshire.

William was single, 5’5” tall, dark complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, scar under right eye, scar on middle finger left hand, literate.

Father: William at Derby
Brother: Charles, Thomas, Edward.
Sisters: Fanny, Sarah anne and Harriet all at native place.

22/6/1847: TOL

3/4/1850: Free Certificate.

26/1/1852: Married Mary Smith at St. George’s Church, Hobart.  William was 28 and a cook, Mary was 22, a spinster.
Children:
9.12.1852: Unnamed Female
7/9/1855: Sarah

22/7/1880-26/4/1881: Return of Paupers discharged from the Invalid Depots, Tasmania:
Wm. Vessey, ship: Duncan, admitted from Hobart - Discharged: On pass. Able to work.

24/10/1881: William died at the New Town Paupers Establishment, Tas., of Morbis cordis, aged 64 years. Listed as a cook.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of James Ring:

The Convict Indentures state that James Ring was 28 years old.  He could read; religion Catholic; status married with 2 children and a native of Kilkenny.  He was a blacksmith.  He was convicted of cow stealing in Kilkenny on 27 March 1828 and sentenced to life.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 6 inches; complexion dark ruddy; hair black and eyes brown.  Transport number 127.
Assigned to Mr Thomas Seely, Bathurst.
Received Conditional Pardon on 30 July 1849.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Mathew Price:

The Convict Indentures state that Mathew Price was 19 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Cork City.  He was an pot boy.  He was convicted of robbing a person in Cork on 3 April 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 1 inches; complexion ruddy and freckled; hair dark brown and eyes hazel.  Transport number 79.
Assigned to Mr Cooper.
Received Ticket of Leave in 1833 (number 33/829).  Received Certificate of Freedom in 1835 (number 35/717).

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Michael Shannahan:

The Convict Indentures state that Michael Shannahan was 19 years old.  He could not read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Cork City.  He was an boat boy.  He was convicted of stealing candle sticks in Cork on 8 April 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 4 inches; complexion ruddy, freckled and pock pitted; hair dark brown and eyes dark brown.  Transport number 83.
Assigned to Mr P. Cunningham, Hunter’s River.
Received Certificate of Freedom on 5 May 1835 (number 35/430).  Government Gazette Wednesday 6 May 1835.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Martin Shea:

The Convict Indentures state that Martin Shea was 42 years old.  He could not read or write; religion Catholic; status married with 3 children and a native of Cork.  He was a plough man.  He was convicted of pig stealing in Cork on 31 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 4 feet 11 inches; complexion ruddy and freckled; hair dark brown and eyes dark brown.  Transport number 118.
Assigned to Mr William Devon, Pitt Water.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Thomas Dainty:

The Convict Indentures state that Thomas Dainty was 20 years old.  He could read and write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Limerick.  He was an indoor servant.  He was convicted of stealing dowlass (I think) in Limerick on 13 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had 2 prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 5 feet 2 1/4 inches; complexion ruddy; hair dark brown and eyes brown.  Transport number 157.
Assigned to Mr William Dunn, Patterson Plains.

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Stokes:

The Convict Indentures state that Patrick Stokes was 20 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Loumeth (I think).  He was an errand boy.  He was convicted of picking pockets in Carlow on 21 March 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 4 feet 11 inches; complexion ruddy and freckled; hair brown and eyes grey.  Transport number 136.
Assigned to Mr J. P Hawkins, Bathurst.
Received Ticket of Leave dated 9 September 1833 (number 33/711.  Government Gazette Wednesday 11 September 1833.  Received Certificate of Freedom in 1835 (number 35/1096).

James Sydney Edward Harrison on 25th February, 2020 wrote of William Vessey:

Married Mary Smith in Hobart Town on 26/01/4852

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Prendergast:

The Convict Indentures state that Patrick Prendergast was 15 or 17 years old.  He could neither read or write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of County Wicklow.  He was a Weaver’s boy.  He was convicted of Robbing a drug house in Wicklow on 7 March 1827 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had no prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 4 feet 9 inches; complexion ruddy and freckled; hair brown and eyes Hazel.  Transport number 4.
Assigned to Mr Richard Holland, Cornwell.
Received Certificate of Freedom on 1834 (number 34/247).

James Sydney Edward Harrison on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Prater:

Married Henry Adams in Hobart Town on 30/05/1836

Wendy Smith on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Richard Hogan:

The Convict Indentures state that Richard Hogan was 15 years old.  He could read and write; religion Catholic; status single and a native of Cork.  He was an errand boy.  He was convicted of house robbery in City Cork on 6 April 1828 and sentenced to 7 years.  He had 2 prior convictions.  Physical attributes - Height 4 feet 11 inches; complexion ruddy, fair and freckled; hair sandy to red and eyes dark brown.  Transport number 64.
Assigned to Mr Bunker, Liverpool.
Received Certificate of Freedom on 5 May 1835 (number 35/300).  Government Gazette Wednesday 6 May 1835.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Mary Whale:

Mary Whale married Henry Stockfish who came as a free settler.

Colonial Secretary Index.

STOCKFISH, Henry. Came free per “Pomana”, 1798; of district of Evan

1809 Feb - Produce received from at the Hawkesbury Stores (Reel 6040; 9/2673 p.7)

1814 Jun 30 - Of Nepean. On list of persons to receive grants of land in 1814 (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.17)

1817 Dec - Petition of his wife Mary Whale for mitigation of sentence to return to England with Stockfish (Fiche 3182; 4/1853 p.366)

1818 - Settler of district of Castlereagh. Recommending Henry Twinger for ticket of leave (Fiche 3190; 4/1856 p.274)

1818 - Recommending James Whitfield for ticket of leave (Fiche 3191; 4/1856 p.289)

1820 Sep 18 - On list of persons for whom grants of land have been handed over to the Surveyor General for delivery (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.59)

1821 Feb 28 - Store receipts of for wheat (Reel 6051; 4/1748 p.155)

1821 Dec 26-1822 Oct 24 - Settler at Castlereagh. Petitions for free pardon for his wife Mary (Fiche 3227; 4/1867 pp.110-2)

1823 Mar - Convict from the Establishment, Emu Plains, assigned to (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.205)

1823 Mar 14 -Of Evan. On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.30)

1824 May 24 -Of Evan. Memorial that grant of common land to Captain King not be made until decision of Earl Bathurst (Fiche 3091; 4/1837B No.409A pp.569-72)

1824 Oct 22 -Of Castlereagh. On list of persons receiving an assigned convict (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.59)

1824 Oct 25 - Of Nepean. Convicts from the Establishment, Emu Plains, assigned to (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.203)

1824 Nov 26 - Memorial (Fiche 3157; 4/1844B No.773 pp.799-802). Reply, 12 May (Reel 6014; 4/3514 p.273)

1825 Jan 17 - Of Evan. Return of Government servants employed by (Fiche 3157; 4/1844B No.773 p.797)

1825 Apr 26 - Signatory to a memorial by magistrates, settlers & stockholders of the District of Evan praying that the common near Castlereagh, recently given to Captain King on a ticket of occupation, be returned to its former purpose (Reel 6017; 4/5782 pp.299-301)

1825 May 12 - On list of persons who have received orders for grants of land (Fiche 3266; 9/2652 p.101)

1825 Aug - Of Evan. On list of persons liable to serve as jurors in the District of Windsor (Reel 6062; 4/1782 p.81b)

1825 Aug 11 - Of Evan. Petition for free pardon for his wife Mary; intending to leave Colony (Fiche 3252; 4/1875 p.218). Reply, 27 Aug (Reel 6015; 4/3515 p.244)

1825 Aug 22 - Settler & stock holder; of District of Evan. On list of persons liable to serve as jurors in the District of Windsor (Reel 6060; 4/1775 p.188[v])

1825 Sep 27 - Signatory to a memorial from the magistrates, land proprietors & settlers of the District of Evan praying for the different public roads to be surveyed (Fiche 3142; 4/1843A No.500A p.276)

STOCKFISH, Mary. Per “Aeolus”, 1809, as Mary Whale; wife of Henry; of Evan

1817 Dec - Petition for mitigation of sentence to return to England with her husband Henry Stockfish; as Whale (Fiche 3182; 4/1853 p.366)

1821 Dec 26-1822 Oct 24 - Petitions of her husband Henry Stockfish for free pardon for (Fiche 3227; 4/1867 pp.110-2)

1825 Aug 11 - Petition of Henry Stockfish for free pardon for wife as they planned to leave Colony (Fiche 3252; 4/1875 p.218)
—————————————————————————

1828 NSW Census at Evan.
Henry Stockfish, age 59, C.F. per Ship Pomono in 1798, settler, protestant, his wife, Mary Stockfish, age 45, C.P. per Ship Eolus,  and 5 servants.
————————————————————————-

NOTICE.-The Executors of the Will of Mr. Henry Stockfish, late of the Nepean River, Farmer, deceased, request that all persons indebted to his Estate, will forthwith pay the amount of their respective debts to Mr. Beddek, Solicitor, Windsor, and that all persons having any claims on the said estate, will forward the particulars thereof to Mr. Beddek without delay.
Sydney Herald, 16 Oct 1839.

————————————————————————-
In the Windsor and Richmond Gazette, 21 May 1904, is an article by a schoolteacher, who describes a visit to an old Church of England cemetery, on a turning off the Windsor and Penrith Road.  Among the gravestones he finds “A beautifully carved stone, with deeply cut lettering – but broken in twain – bears this inscription:
In Memory of Henry Stockfish, who departed this life September 16, 1839, aged 72 years. Also Mary Stockfish who departed this life July 11, 1840, aged 84 years.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Henry Jupp:

Morning Advertiser London, England
20 Mar 1818

SHIPLEY GANG
James Evans, James Jupp, Philip Jupp, and Henry Jupp, James Nye, sen. James Nye, jun. Thomas Philpot, and Daniel Rapley, were arraigned upon ten indictments for various burglaries and felonies committed within the last two years. The prisoners formed a gang which has been the terror of the county for the last three years ; at length the above prisoners were apprehended.  This morning, on being brought into Court, they pleaded Guilty to all the indictments.
MR. COMMON SERJEANT and MR. CURWOOD, who were Counsel for the prosecution, stated, that as the prisoners seemed actuated by a sense of contrition for their past conduct, into which hey had been seduced by an old offender, they, on the part of the prosecution, recommended them to the mercy of the Court.
It was understood that the leader of this gang was Daniel Rapley, sen. an old offender, who, when he found the party was discovered and apprehended, hanged himself.

James Jupp was also on board.
Daniel Rapley was also on board.
Phillip Jupp - may be the one on the ‘Susan’ 1837 to VDL - not transported earlier.
No ships found for the others.

Henry Jupp was listed as 25 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Horsham.

Henry was 5’10½” tall, fair ruddy complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes.

1828 Census: Age 37 years, Castle Hill, Greater Sydney, NSW.

1829: Married Margaret Goodin (born in the colony) 16/6/1806-1865.  Married at Field of Mars, NSW.
Children:
Lucy Jupp 1828–1897
James Jupp 1830–1907
Mary Ann Jupp 1831–1833
Ruth Jupp 1833–
Henry Thomas Jupp 1835–1913
Martha Jupp 1838–1855
Andrew Jupp 1840–1923
John Jupp 1842–1853
Elizabeth Ann Jupp 1843–1902
Hannah Mary Jupp 1845–1925

12/10/1827: TOL Kissing Point Bench.
10/7/1834: CP

1865: Henry Jupp died at Ryde, NSW., aged 74.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of George Stockbridge:

Colonial Secretary Index.

STOCKBRIDGE, George. Per “Dick”, 1821

1821 Sep 1,13 - Re permission to marry Lucy Ashton at Liverpool (Reel 6008; 4/3504 p.300)

1822 Jan 21 - Recommended to be a constable at Liverpool (Reel 6054; 4/1759 p.100)

1822 Mar 14 - Appointed Constable, Liverpool (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.48)

1822 May 23 - Dismissed (Reel 6039; 4/424 p.60)

1822 Sep 14 - Husband of Mary [Lucy] Stockbridge. On return of convicts discharged from the Establishment, Emu Plains; to Parramatta (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.121)

1824 Apr 10 - On list of prisoners on establishment at Bathurst with sentences not transmitted (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.101)
—————————————————————————

George married Lucy Ashton, who was a convict on Morley 1820.

D Wong on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Henry Bishop:

Sherborne Mercury Dorset, England
9 Aug 1864

SOMERSET MIDSUMMER ASSIZE
ATTEMPTING MURDER A WIFE. Henry Bishop, 20, labourer, pleaded not guilty to an indictment charging him with shooting at his wife, Louisa Bishop, Bath, on the 16th of April last, with intent to Murder her. It appeared from the evidence of the prosecutrix that on the 16th of April lasst, she was in Bath, and met the prisoner, from whom she had been separated.  He asked her to return or tell him where she was going, but she refused.  Prisoner then asked if she “had anything more to say.”  She replied that she hoped he would do well, and immediately after she felt she had been shot.  Some of the shot entered her right eye, and she consequently was permanently deprived of its use.  Immediately after prisoner give himself into custody, saying to the officer that he had “settled her.”  For the defence Mr Bailey called Mr Dawson, printer, Market Place, Bath, who said his opinion certainly was that the prisoner was of weak mind.  He (Mr Dawson) would have great pleasure in again taking the prisoner into his employment, where he had been for seven years.  The learned judge having summed up, briefly placing the issues before the jury, the prisoner was found guilty on the count charging him with shooting with intent to inflict grievous bodily harm.  The Judge, in sentencing the prisoner, said that in his opinion he was a murderer with intent.  [These words had scarcely escaped the lips of his lordship when the prisoner, uttered a loud cry, fell back upon the gaolers quite insensible.  After some time he was able to sit in a chair, assisted by the gaolers.]
The Judge then, in a very few words, sentenced him to ten years’ penal servitude.

Henry Bishop was 22 years old on arrival.  He was married, no children, 5’8½” tall, light brown hair, blue eyes, long face, dark complexion, stout made, cupped marks on shoulders and breast.

2/5/1869: TOL
7/8/1874: COF

Comments: General servant, cook, brickmaker.  To NSW 2/3/1875.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Aarons:

More information about Joseph and Rachel Aarons can be found in
“These are the Names: Jewish Lives in Australia, 1788-1850.” by John S. Levi.

Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Aarons:

Joseph aarons and his wife Rachel were both tried at the Old Bailey.

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 24 February 2020), September 1821, trial of JOSEPH AARONS RACHEL AARONS (t18210912-78).
JOSEPH AARONS, RACHEL AARONS, Theft > theft from a specified place, 12th September 1821.

1123. JOSEPH AARONS and RACHEL AARONS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , eighteen yards of woollen cloth, value 18 l., the goods of James Blakesley and William Lester , privately, in their warehouse .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM LESTER . I am in partnership with John Blakesley ; we are Blackwell-hall factors , and live in Basinghall-street - I saw the female prisoner go out of the warehouse and brought back by the porter, and heard the cloth fall from her.

HARRY KENDAL . I am clerk to the prosecutors. On the 4th of September, the prisoners came together to the warehouse, about five o’clock in the afternoon, and asked to see some blue cloth - I shewed them two pieces; the man enquired the price, and said he should buy for money, he spoke English, and understood me; I think the woman understood very little English - he bought nothing that night, but went away, saying, he should call next morning, but did not - on Thursday morning, a little past nine o’clock, when I got to the warehouse, I found them both there, they had been looking at cloth; when I went in, the man asked me to shew him some black cloth, and said, he had had the rheumatism, which was the reason he had not been on Wednesday - I shewed him some, he wishedfor patterns of the blue which he had seen that morning - I went into the back warehouse to get them; on my return, the woman was gone, he remained for the patterns - he said he would come again in fifteen or twenty minutes, and pay for what he wanted, not having then fixed on any thing, I had left the female standing within six yards of the door - there was a quantity of cloths in the warehouse when I left her - while I was speaking to the man, she was brought back (before he had quitted the door), by Stevens - the cloth was nearly covered by her gown - by her side, she had a large shawl also, which seemed to hide it, she appeared pregnant; immediately on her coming inside the warehouse, I saw the cloth drop from her, it was eighteen yards and a quarter of blue cloth - we are the manufacturers of it; seventeen yards and a half would be the payable length - I saw it on the previous evening in the back warehouse; where they had been looking at cloth - Stebbing was with them when I came. The cloth had not been sold.

Q. Did you observe the man do any thing when she was brought in - A. He appeared angry, patted her on the bonnet, and said,

“What did you do this for?” An apron was found in the warehouse. I did not see her take any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is this a warehouse for retail business - A. No, wholesale; we sell goods there - each piece is kept separate. The porter sleeps up stairs, and lives there. There is always somebody there to show goods.

JOHN STEBBING . I am employed in the prosecutors’ warehouse; I was there on the 6th of September; the prisoners came in together about nine o’clock, the man apologised for not coming before, saying he had the rheumatism in his leg; he asked to see some blue cloth - which I showed him; Kendal came in just as they were going away; he was then shewed black cloth. The woman was then standing in the front of the warehouse, against the door - she appeared pregnant. I took the counting-house stool down for her to sit on, if she was disposed. I believe she did not sit down. There was a number of pieces of cloth, standing on their ends on the ground; Kendal went back to cut patterns, while he was gone I was in the front warehouse - the man opened the door for the woman to go out, and shut it after her. Stevens brought her back. I did not see her take anything, nor had I any suspicion - there is a yard which they must cross from the warehouse and on the left hand is the carpet warehouse, the door of which they would pass. When she was brought back I saw the cloth drop from her; it appeared suspended from her right side; but when she got in it dropped upon the warehouse floor. The male prisoner slapped her bonnet, and said,

“What did you do that for?” He did not ask for any thing after he let her out. Kendall was gone for the patterns, only he and I were in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Her being pregnant prevented your suspicions - A. Yes; the man slightly slapped her bonnet, and said, in an angry tone, “What did you do that for?” He stood at her side.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you observe her when she moved to go to the door - A. The man stood behind her - I was behind him, within five yards of him. He opened the door and shut it after her.

JOHN STEVENS . I am porter to the prosecutors. My suspicions were excited by something before; and on Thursday I saw the prisoner come in, and heard the door open, and saw the woman go out by herself - I was in the carpet warehouse in the passage; she came along close by the door - I ran to the window, looked at her, and thought she looked rather more bulky on her right side than when she came in - I went up to her, and hit my left hand against the cloth, and said. “You have got it, have you, and I have got you” - she sighed, I took her back, it dropped from her - I produce it, having kept it ever since.

THOMAS LAUCHLAND . I am in the service of the prosecutors. I found an apron among some cloths where I had seen the prisoners walking, in the front warehouse - I found it directly she was taken; it does not belong to the warehouse.

MR. LESTER. The cloth is ours, and contains eighteen yards and a quarter. We charge it at seventeen yards; it cost us upwards of 16 l., as the manufacturers.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the cost price - A. As near as I can guess, 16 l. odd shillings. We do not expose goods for sale; our names are on the door, and woollen warehouse - our chief trade is on commission; we never sell less than an end.

JOSEPH AARON ‘S Defence. (Through an interpreter.) What my wife did, I know nothing about. I am a merchant ; the prosecutors did not see my wife take it no more than I did - I gave her two slaps on the bonnet for doing it.

RACHAEL AARON ‘S Defence. What I did, was unknown to my husband.

JOSEPH AARONS - GUILTY Aged 34.

RACHAEL AARONS - GUILTY Aged 30.

Of stealing under the value of 15 l.

Transported for Life .
————————————————————————-
London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.
Colonial Secretary Index.

AARONS, Joseph. Per “Princess Royal”, 1823

1823 Oct 20, Nov 17 - Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3230; 4/1869 pp.1-2)
1823 Nov 28 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.2)
1824 Jan 20 - Petition for mitigation of sentence (Fiche 3239; 4/1872 p.1)
1824 Apr 25 - Petition from his wife Rachel to have him assigned to her (Reel 6061; 4/1779 p.36). Reply, 6 May (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.174)
1824 Dec 11 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.3)
——————————————————————————
Joseph’s wife Rachel was transported on Mary 1823.

Colonial Secretary Index.

AARONS, Rachel. Per “Mary”, 1823

1824 Apr 25 - Petition to have her husband Joseph assigned to her (Reel 6061; 4/1779 p.36). Reply, 6 May (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.174)
1824 Dec 11 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.3)

————————————————————————
THE dames of this quarter, young and old, were afforded an ample opportunity of exchanging their mouldy dollars and long-hoarded rupees, for caps, lace, and every description of attire of the newest fashions, which the great depot of taste and vertu, had transmitted to us per the late arrivals; by a well-timed visit from the ” Head Quarters” of Colonial luxury, of that honest plain Israelite Joseph Aarons, the dealer, with a whole cargo of goods,
Of description multifarious,
To suit tastes and fancies various;
Tobacco and Cheese, Cut Glass and Crockery,
Rings, Jackets, and Teas, with Watches and Clockery. 
All of which he submitted to the hammer of the facetious Mr. Battie. Spirited biddings soon exhausted the purses of many, and supplied the wants of more. Then for “up-the-banks.” The Wheat tumbled into the boat —as the redundancy of gaieties were unsparingly handed out; bushels on one side, in return for yards on the other —the stacks in yard diminishing in a corresponding ratio with the boxes of finery; till the looks of the “‘good man of the house,” bore evidence of his perfect willingness to see an end of the ” BARGAINS.”
The speculation could not have been a bad one.
The Monitor, (Sydney) 25 Feb 1828.

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CRIMINAL COURT.
Supreme Court, Monday, before Judge Dowling. William Price was indicted for stealing a bed tick, the property of Joseph Aarons, of George-street. Prosecutor stated, that prisoner came to his house and asked for lodgings, which were supplied him, and shortly afterwards he was discovered concealing the bed tick, but affected to be drunk. Prisoner in his defence said he was drunk, and knew nothing about it.—Guilty.
Sydney Gazette, 6 June 1829.
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Supreme Criminal Court. THURSDAY, JUNE 18.
John Rice was indicted for stealing a sack and a quantity of corn, the property of Joseph Aarons, on the 3d of April last. Mrs. Rachel Aarons, wife of Joseph Aarons, dealer, residing in George-street, stated that, on the 3rd of April last, two bushels of corn, contained in a sack, were stolen from the premises of her husband.  The bag and the corn were the property of witness’ husband, and were worth more than £1; witness saw the bag and the corn in the back kitchen, about an hour before it was stolen.
By the prisoner.—I do not think prisoner stole the property, but it was found in his house.
Francis Sutland, a Sydney constable, deposed that on the 3d of April, he went to the house of the prisoner, in Company with Joseph Aarons, and desired him to give up the property which had been brought into his house a few minutes before.—
The learned Judge here interposed, and told the Jury that the evidence did not support the information, which charged the prisoner with stealing the property in question.  He might be indicted if it were thought necessary, for receiving the property knowing it to have been stolen, but after the evidence of the first witness he must be acquitted of the present charge.
The Jury accordingly acquitted the prisoner, who was remanded to answer another charge to be preferred against him.
Sydney Gazette, 20 June 1829.
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Government Notice. Colonial Secretary’s Office, Sydney, July 17th, 1829.
THE Right Honorable the Secretary of State for the Colonies has signified to His Excellency the Governor, in his Despatch No. 84, dated 14th January, 1829, His Majesty’s gracious Approbation and Allowance of the CONDITIONAL PARDONS respectively dated 27th May, 1828, and granted to the undermentioned Individuals, viz :
Joseph Aarons, per Ship Princess Royal.
Sydney Gazette, 23 Jul 1829.

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On Tuesday week, the rite of circumcision was performed for the second time in this Colony, on the infant son of Mr. Joseph Aarons of George-street. Mr. C Hyam performed the office of High Priest.
Sydney Monitor,  24 Oct 1829.
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Maureen Withey on 25th February, 2020 wrote of Rachael Aarons:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 24 February 2020), September 1821, trial of JOSEPH AARONS RACHEL AARONS (t18210912-78).
JOSEPH AARONS, RACHEL AARONS, Theft > theft from a specified place, 12th September 1821.

1123. JOSEPH AARONS and RACHEL AARONS were indicted for stealing, on the 6th of September , eighteen yards of woollen cloth, value 18 l., the goods of James Blakesley and William Lester , privately, in their warehouse .

MR. BRODRICK conducted the prosecution.

MR. WILLIAM LESTER . I am in partnership with John Blakesley ; we are Blackwell-hall factors , and live in Basinghall-street - I saw the female prisoner go out of the warehouse and brought back by the porter, and heard the cloth fall from her.

HARRY KENDAL . I am clerk to the prosecutors. On the 4th of September, the prisoners came together to the warehouse, about five o’clock in the afternoon, and asked to see some blue cloth - I shewed them two pieces; the man enquired the price, and said he should buy for money, he spoke English, and understood me; I think the woman understood very little English - he bought nothing that night, but went away, saying, he should call next morning, but did not - on Thursday morning, a little past nine o’clock, when I got to the warehouse, I found them both there, they had been looking at cloth; when I went in, the man asked me to shew him some black cloth, and said, he had had the rheumatism, which was the reason he had not been on Wednesday - I shewed him some, he wishedfor patterns of the blue which he had seen that morning - I went into the back warehouse to get them; on my return, the woman was gone, he remained for the patterns - he said he would come again in fifteen or twenty minutes, and pay for what he wanted, not having then fixed on any thing, I had left the female standing within six yards of the door - there was a quantity of cloths in the warehouse when I left her - while I was speaking to the man, she was brought back (before he had quitted the door), by Stevens - the cloth was nearly covered by her gown - by her side, she had a large shawl also, which seemed to hide it, she appeared pregnant; immediately on her coming inside the warehouse, I saw the cloth drop from her, it was eighteen yards and a quarter of blue cloth - we are the manufacturers of it; seventeen yards and a half would be the payable length - I saw it on the previous evening in the back warehouse; where they had been looking at cloth - Stebbing was with them when I came. The cloth had not been sold.

Q. Did you observe the man do any thing when she was brought in - A. He appeared angry, patted her on the bonnet, and said,

“What did you do this for?” An apron was found in the warehouse. I did not see her take any thing.

Cross-examined by MR. ANDREWS. Q. Is this a warehouse for retail business - A. No, wholesale; we sell goods there - each piece is kept separate. The porter sleeps up stairs, and lives there. There is always somebody there to show goods.

JOHN STEBBING . I am employed in the prosecutors’ warehouse; I was there on the 6th of September; the prisoners came in together about nine o’clock, the man apologised for not coming before, saying he had the rheumatism in his leg; he asked to see some blue cloth - which I showed him; Kendal came in just as they were going away; he was then shewed black cloth. The woman was then standing in the front of the warehouse, against the door - she appeared pregnant. I took the counting-house stool down for her to sit on, if she was disposed. I believe she did not sit down. There was a number of pieces of cloth, standing on their ends on the ground; Kendal went back to cut patterns, while he was gone I was in the front warehouse - the man opened the door for the woman to go out, and shut it after her. Stevens brought her back. I did not see her take anything, nor had I any suspicion - there is a yard which they must cross from the warehouse and on the left hand is the carpet warehouse, the door of which they would pass. When she was brought back I saw the cloth drop from her; it appeared suspended from her right side; but when she got in it dropped upon the warehouse floor. The male prisoner slapped her bonnet, and said,

“What did you do that for?” He did not ask for any thing after he let her out. Kendall was gone for the patterns, only he and I were in the warehouse.

Cross-examined by MR. LAW. Q. Her being pregnant prevented your suspicions - A. Yes; the man slightly slapped her bonnet, and said, in an angry tone, “What did you do that for?” He stood at her side.

MR. BRODRICK. Q. Did you observe her when she moved to go to the door - A. The man stood behind her - I was behind him, within five yards of him. He opened the door and shut it after her.

JOHN STEVENS . I am porter to the prosecutors. My suspicions were excited by something before; and on Thursday I saw the prisoner come in, and heard the door open, and saw the woman go out by herself - I was in the carpet warehouse in the passage; she came along close by the door - I ran to the window, looked at her, and thought she looked rather more bulky on her right side than when she came in - I went up to her, and hit my left hand against the cloth, and said. “You have got it, have you, and I have got you” - she sighed, I took her back, it dropped from her - I produce it, having kept it ever since.

THOMAS LAUCHLAND . I am in the service of the prosecutors. I found an apron among some cloths where I had seen the prisoners walking, in the front warehouse - I found it directly she was taken; it does not belong to the warehouse.

MR. LESTER. The cloth is ours, and contains eighteen yards and a quarter. We charge it at seventeen yards; it cost us upwards of 16 l., as the manufacturers.

Cross-examined. Q. What is the cost price - A. As near as I can guess, 16 l. odd shillings. We do not expose goods for sale; our names are on the door, and woollen warehouse - our chief trade is on commission; we never sell less than an end.

JOSEPH AARON ‘S Defence. (Through an interpreter.) What my wife did, I know nothing about. I am a merchant ; the prosecutors did not see my wife take it no more than I did - I gave her two slaps on the bonnet for doing it.

RACHAEL AARON ‘S Defence. What I did, was unknown to my husband.

JOSEPH AARONS - GUILTY Aged 34.

RACHAEL AARONS - GUILTY Aged 30.

Of stealing under the value of 15 l.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

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Colonial Secretary Index.

AARONS, Rachel. Per “Mary”, 1823

1824 Apr 25 - Petition to have her husband Joseph assigned to her (Reel 6061; 4/1779 p.36). Reply, 6 May (Reel 6013; 4/3511 p.174)
1824 Dec 11 - On list of prisoners assigned (Fiche 3290; 4/4570D p.3)
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Certificate of Freedom obtained.
Mary (3), Rachael, the wife of Joseph Aarons.
Sydney Monitor, 17 Nov 1830.
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AARONS.—At her residence, 472 Elizabeth-street South, Rachel, relict of the late Joseph Aarons, senior, and mother of Mrs. Knapp, Elizabeth-street North, and grandmother of Edward Knapp, surveyor.
The Empire (Sydney), 31 July 1866.

FUNERAL.-The Funeral of the Mrs. JOSEPH AARONS will move from her late residence, 472, Elizabeth-street South, at 4 o’clock, THIS AFTERNOON.
Sydney Morning Herald, 25 July 1866.

Ann Marie Gould on 24th February, 2020 wrote of Henry Bishop:

Shot his wife Louisa in the face in Bath, Somerset

Wendy Orchard on 24th February, 2020 wrote of Tryphena Morgan:

She was convicted in 1833 for ‘Stealing Wearing Apparel’.
She married convict (Thomas CLIFTON) on 17 Feb 1837 in Morpeth, NSW, Australia

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