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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Robert Flanagan:

Robert Flanagan’s wife, Ann Marsh, had arrived on the “Lady Juliana” in June 1790.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Robert Flanagan:

Robert Flanagan - on ship indent as “Flannagan” - was tried at the Co Armagh Assizes in April 1791 and found guilty.

Belfast Newsletter Friday 29 April 1791 page 3
“ARMAGH ASSIZES
“Robert Flanagan found guilty of a highway robbery, judgement respited till further orders.”

“Judgement respited until further orders implies that he was originally given the death sentence, but some appeal or consideration on his behalf caused it to be put into abeyance until further consideration of those matters. In the end, he was transported for seven years -per record on the indent of “Boddingtons” on which he sailed.

“Boddingtons’ indent also recorded him as aged 42 years. As the ship did not depart until February 1793, the indent was made up shortly prior to then.

He had been incarcerated since at least April 1791 - getting close to two years. He may have been more like 40 years when he was tried.

ARRIVAL in NSW
“Boddingtons’ arrived at Sydney Cove on 7th August 1793.

There are few records of Robert Flanagan.
He would have been due to become free in April 1798.

He formally married on 27 November 1796, at St John’s church Parramatta to convict Ann Marsh.
Unusually, they had the permission of the Governor, John Hunter, to do so. It is possible one or both had been married already. Both signed their names in the register as did the witnesses, James John Grant, and Ann Blady.

Ann Marsh must have been 4 - 5 months pregnant when they married since their daughter Susannah was born on 17 April 1797, but was not baptised until two years later, at St Phillip’s Church in Sydney, on 31st March 1799.
2 year old Susannah was baptised together with her one year old sister, Elizabeth, born on 7 April 1798.

Richard Flanagan’s wIfe, Ann Marsh, had arrived in NSW on the Second Fleet on ” ” She had already had two children to different fathers. A daughter, who did not survive, was born in 1791 to the ship’s surgeon, Richard Alley.

Ann then had a son -  baptismal record as John “Irvine”, also “Irvin” and “Irving” - with convict John Irving embarked “Scarborough but arrived ‘Lady Penrhyn”. John Irving the convict died in 1795 (NSWBDM).

Ann’s relationship with Robert Flanagan follows John Irving’s death.

There is no record of what happened to Richard Flanagan. However Ann was living with William Chapman by 1800 (an emancipated convict per “PItt” in 1791) when she had a daughter to him baptised in 1800 - Eliza.

Thereafter Ann had many re children with William Chapman until he died in 1810.

Robert Flanagan & Ann’s daughter, Elizabeth, became known by the name of Chapman, since she was married in 1817 as Elizabeth Chapman to Edward Priest.

Vicki Beveridge on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Eliza Williams:

Had 3 children baptised in Battery Point in Hobart before moving to Melbourne and then on to Moliagul where the rest of their children were born.
Susan got ticket of leave June 1839 and this is when she started using her real name Susan Benson or Susan Hewitt.
Thomas and Susan had 6 children, most stayed in Australia. Their eldest son Thomas born in hobart immigrated to NZ in 1863 after the death of his parents.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of William Mason:

IRISH CRIME

Belfast Newsletter Friday 29 April 1791 page 3
“ARMAGH ASSIZES
William Mason found guilty for a burglary and felony, to be hanged on 24th May”

Mason was reprieved from the death sentence, on acceptng transportation to NSW instead, for seven years, arriving on ship ‘Boddingtons’, where the indent recorded him as Aged 24, convicted April 1791 at Co Armagh, seven year sentence.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of John Reilly:

Correction: Belfast Newsletter reports John Reilly guilty of “stealing 5 sheep”.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of John Reilly:

On indent of Boddingtons, transported as John “RIELY”, Aged 42, convicted April 1791, Co Armagh, transported for seven years.

Belfast Newsletter Friday 29 April 1791 page 3:
“Armagh Assizes
“John REILLY for stealing a sheep, found guilty, but recommended by the grand jury for transportation.”

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Patrick Allen:

PATRICK ALLEN in NSW

He did not get his Certificate of Freedom until 1811 - dated 2nd February 1811. In fact he would have been entitled to a certificate of freedom nine tears earlier, and it does in fact note that his term expired in March 1802.

By 1820 Patrick Allen was employed at Parramatta as a tanner with a man named Jones who had a tanning business.
This information comes from a memorial he sent to Governor Macquarie, dated 1st June 1820.

Land GrantMemorial dated June 1st, 1820, summary:
• Patrick Allen was a tanner of Parramatta Arrived
      per Marquis Cornwallis
• Had been a free man for a number of years
• Resides at Parramatta
• Supporting an honest industrious character
• Had never received any indulgence of land from
      government
• Was anxious to improve a farm
• Humbly implores His Excellency to take his
      case into consideration and grant a parcel of
      land for a Farm.

His application was supported by J. Harris, J.P [John Harris?] who wrote simply that
“This man is employed with Jones the tanner in that capacity at Parramatta.”
and was also signed by George Middleton who noted that he was of “Parramatta – Officiating Chaplain”.

Macquarie noted in handwriting on the side: “30 acres”

* Patrick Allen does not say anything about having a family so it is likely that he was a single man the whole time.
* He got a land grant of 30 acres at Minto. However, at some stage between 1820 and 1831 he sold this land (or otherwise disposed of it) to William Klensendorff. Klensendorff had acquired several 30 acre blocks originally granted to others at Minto (see Sydney Gazette, 15 October 1831, p.1)

Grants of land about to be formally made were published for general information in the Sydney Gazette in order that anyone may have an opportunity for correcting any errors/omissions – and if no caveat was lodged against the particular property within a month then Deeds of Grant would be prepared.

Sydney Gazette 20 Sept 1831 page 1:
“MINTO
“3.  Patrick Allen, 30, Thirty Acres; bounded on the East by a line South 58 chains, commencing at Johnson’s North-west corner; on the South by a line West 30 degrees North 8 chains ; on the West by a line North 58 chains ; and on the North by Curran Creek.
“Promised by Governor Macquarie on the 31st March, 1821 ; Quit-rent, 1s. sterling per annum, commencing 1st January, 1827.”

But William Klensendorff must have lodged a caveat against Patrick Allen’s 30 acre foral land grant and the land was readvertised the following month for a document to be issued to Klensendorff. See Sydney Gazette 15 October 1831 page 1.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Patrick Allen:

The crime for which Patrick Allen was transported was tried at the Lent Assizes for the county of Antrim held at Carrickfergus in late March, 1795:

Belfast Newsletter Monday March 30 1795, p.3:
“The following persons were tried at the Antrim Assizes held at Carrickfergus which ended on Wednesday last (i.e 25 March):
“PAT ALLEN found guilty of feloniously taking 25 yards of linen cloth out of the bleach yard of Jonathon Richardson, value 10s. to be transported for 7 years. “

William Baxter who was tried at the same assizes for the same crime (but whose death sentence was commuted) also sailed on the same ship to NSW.

The indent of the Marquis Cornwallis, which sailed just over four months after the trial, recorded Patrick Allen as being aged 28, and tried at Antrim in March 1795, given a seven year sentence.

WAS THIS THE PAT ALLEN of 1792 GAOL ESCAPE from DOWNPATRICK?
A man named Patrick Allen had escaped from Downpatrick Gaol with Patrick Marmion (also per Marquis Cornwallis) and several others in April or May 1792?  Allen’s age on the indent of Marquis Cornwallis in 1795 was said to be 28 years, however if his age was consistent with the 1792 escapee description given for pat Allen, he would be aged 38 years (a possible transcribing error).

A report of the original trial which put that earlier Patrick Allen into Downpatrick Gaol hasn’t yet been located. However, when Pat Marmion was before the court at Downpatrick in April 1791, there was also a John Allen given a short one month sentence – was this person related to Patrick Allen of the Downpatrick incident?
Freemans Journal, Saturday April 16th 1791 p. 4
“Downpatrick Assizes
“At the Assizes for the county Down, which commenced in Downpatrick before the Hon Baron Power, on the 7th [April] and ended the 13th April 1791 — the following persons were put on their trial, viz:
“John Allen, for assaulting the Rev Mr Frazer of Kirkcubbin, - guilty, to be imprisoned a month and fined a mark.”

If the two Patrick Allens are the same person, then he was at large for almost three years. However,  the report of the Carrickfergus Assizes in 1795 did not refer to him as having escaped from gaol or “returning from transportation” if that had been the original Downpatrick sentence.

See Patrick Marmion record for detailed description of the Downpatrick Patrick Allen.

A Patrick Allen was also tried at Downpatrick later in 1792, in September, a few months after the gaol break, for robbing a bleach-green at Downpatrick. But he was acquitted with several others. It would be thought that if this was the same gaol escape man, he would be recognised and returned to gaol. However, it’s also possible that the gaol escape Pat Allen was different to the bleach-green robbing Pat Allen but that the bleach-green robber is the same as the 1795 Co Antrim convict:

Freemans Journal Thurs 6 Sept 1792 page 4
“Downpatrick Assizes
“Patrick Conway of felony – to be transported
“Patrick Carr for a felony – to be transported
“Patrick Allen, Daniel McSevigny, Elizabeth Dorman, and Elizabeth Stewart, acquitted of stealing linen out of the bleach-yard of James Agnew of Drumbridge.
“Patrick Allen, George Mckeever, John Newton, James Ennis, Michael Ennis, Thomas Shortin, and Edward Straney, acquitted of felonies.
(Remainder in our next)”
___________________________________________

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of William Baxter:

Baxter’s 7 year sentence would have expired in March 1802.

He is not the William Baxter recorded in NSWBDM as marrying Mary “Ware” in 1803 – this is a marine who arrived free on “Alexander” in the First Fleet who had a son with Mary Watts/Ware/Weir in 1792 when Irish William Baxter had not yet arrived in the country. (See biographical database of Australia)

William Baxter per “Marquis Cornwallis” is not easy to find in the usual convict records after this.

Robin Sharkey on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of William Baxter:

William Baxter was transported on the Marquis Cornwallis after trial at the County of Antrim Assizes held at Carrickfergus in late March 1795 (ending Wednesday 25th March).

His original death sentence of hanging on 12th May 1795 was commuted on condition of accepting transportation instead, for a period of seven years. He was transported on ‘Marquis Cornwallis’ and recorded on the indent as being aged 35 years.

Just over four months after his trial, William Baxter, recorded as aged 35, was transported to NSW on the Marquis Cornwallis, departing from Cork on 9th August 1795. With him were two other convicts tried at Antrim, - one was Pat Allen also tried at the same March 1795 Antrim Assizes, and the other was Archibald Kane tried in 1795.

Belfast Newsletter Monday March 30, p.3:
“The following persons were tried at the Antrim Assizes held at Carrickfergus which ended on Wednesday last (i.e 25 March):
“WILLIAM BAXTER, found guilty of feloniously stealing cloth out of the Bleach-yard of John Russell – ordered to be hanged on 12th May next.”

Nell Murphy on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of John Dunn:

Although there are many persons named “John DUNN” in the Colony at this time, research on his wife, Jane ARNOTT, reveals that he was charged with the death of her. (ref. convict conduct record, inquest.)

DEATH of wife Jane DUNN:
1867: Killed by husband John DUNN.  Coronor’s inquest and memo 30 August 1867.  (ref. noted on her Conduct Record, Tasmanian Archives & Inquest ref 195/1/51 no. 6274)
Inquest statement: “that John DUNN of Little Oyster Cove, did inflict one mortal wound on the forehead of the said Jane DUNN on the sixth day of August 1867 from which she died”.

Further research needed for outcome of what criminal charges were made.

Nell Murphy on 22nd March, 2019 wrote of Jane Arnott:

Jane ARNOTT was charged and convicted at the Central Criminal Court London on 19 Sept 1842 for forging and uttering a forged acquittance and receipt, with intent to defraud. On the same date of court she was also charged with stealing 2 silver spoons.  The Court clerk noted she had 5 previous offences. 7 yr transportation sentence.  Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania), Australia per the ship “Margaret” arriving 10 July 1843. Ship Surgeon’s report: “good”.

Aged 37 or 39 yrs; a cook; single woman; 5’1 1/2” height; Church of England.
Sister Sarah at London.

Colony of VDL:
Assigned to work services.
17 May 1844 - 3rd Class status.
10 July 1845 - drunk. 14 days solitary confinement.
16 Feb 1847: Ticket of Leave granted.
28 Oct 1849: Certificate of Freedom.

APPLICATION FOR PERMISSION TO MARRY:
8 Sept 1845 - John DUNN per ‘Waterloo’ to Jane ARNOTT per ‘Margaret’. Ref. 52/1/2

MARRIAGE:
1 Oct 1845 - John DUNN, aged 34yrs, trade - a smith to Jane ARNOTT, aged 35yrs, at St. George’s Church, Hobart. (ref. 37/1/4 no. 1653)

DEATH:
1867: Killed by husband John DUNN.  Coronor’s inquest and memo 30 August 1867.  (ref. noted on her Conduct Record, Tasmanian Archives & Inquest ref 195/1/51 no. 6274)
Inquest statement: “that John DUNN of Little Oyster Cove, did inflict one mortal wound on the forehead of the said Jane DUNN on the sixth day of August 1867 from which she died”.

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of Hugh Boyle:

Two other convicts who were sentenced at the same Monaghan Assizes to be hanged on the same day - John Davison for horse stealing, and James Martin also for horse stealing -  were also pardoned on condition of transportation to NSW, and both arrived with Hugh Boyle in NSW on the Marquis Cornwallis.

Geoff Moran on 21st March, 2019 wrote of Mary Ann Ormisher:

Married Francis Henry Moran

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of Hugh Boyle:

Two other convicts who were sentenced at the same Monaghan Assizes to be hanged on the same day - John Davison for horse stealing, and James Martin also for horse stealing -  were also pardoned on condition of transportation to NSW, and both arrived with Hugh Boyle in NSW on the Marquis Cornwallis.

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of James Martin:

Two other convicts who were sentenced at the same Monaghan Assizes to be hanged on the same day - John Davison also for horse stealing, and Hugh Boyle for burglary and theft of a gun - were also pardoned and transported to NSW with Hugh Boyle on the Marquis Cornwallis.

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of John Davison:

John Davison was tried at Monaghan, Ireland, in April 1795 for horse-stealing and was found guilty.
He was originally sentence to be hanged on 11th May 1795, but clemency was extended to him and he was instead transported to NSW for seven years.

Belfast Newsletter, Monday 13 April 1795 p. 2
“Monaghan Assizes
“John Davison found guilty of horse-stealing – ordered to be hanged 11th May next.”

Two other Monaghan convicts who were sentenced a the same Assizes to be hanged on the same day - James Martin for horse stealing also, and Hugh Boyle for burglary and theft of a gun - were also pardoned and transported to NSW on the same convict ship: Marquis Cornwallis.

Davison appears on the indent of the Marquis Cornwallis, arriving in Sydney in February 1796. He is listed as aged 40 years (this would be on departure from Ireland), tried in County Monaghan in “March 1795” and the sentence was a term of seven years.

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of James Martin:

James Martin was tried at Monagan in 1795 for horse-stealing and found guilty. He was transported for seven years after clemency was extended to him so that his original death sentence was not carried out.

Belfast Newsletter, Monday 13 April 1795 p. 2
“Monaghan Assizes
“James Martin found guilty of horse-stealing – ordered to be hanged 11th May next.”

Appears on the indent of the Marquis Cornwallis, arriving in Sydney in February 1796.

in the NSW 1825 Muster he claimed he came free on ‘Cornwallis’ in 1795. He was a housekeeper (i.e. probably meaning for himself) at Parramatta.

Robin Sharkey on 21st March, 2019 wrote of Catherine Melin:

Catherine Melin or Mellon was tried in Dublin in April, 1795 and given a sentence of transportation for seven years, arriving on the ship “Marquis Cornwallis”. (per Indent of ‘Marquis Cornwallis’).

In 1801 the muster recorded her as being at the home of D’Arcy Wentworth and off stores.

The 1806 Muster recorded her as Free by Servitude and the wife of John White (note - not necessarily legally married).

She was a dressmaker and a milliner and advertised her business in June 1808:

The Sydney Gazette, Sunday 19 June 1808 p.2
“Catherine Mellon, mantua maker and milliner begs leave to inform ladies and the public at
large, that all orders with which she may be favoured in the above branches shall be punctually
executed, either in a plain or fashionable mode, on terms which she trusts will not be considered unwarrantable.—All commands forwarded to her, at No. 12, Back Row East, will be immediately attended to.”

Possibly Catherine Mellon was the person recorded in 1806 as living with John White, being the “Catherine White” referred to by a John White in the following advertisement, which appeared in the same newspaper – on the same page -  as the above advertisement by Catherine Mellon, mantua maker:

The Sydney Gazette, Sunday 8 October 1809 p.2
“WHEREAS my wife Catherine White having absconded from my house with a number of
blank Promissory Notes or Checks, printed for me and having my marginal scroll, in her possession all persons are hereby forbid receiving in payment any notes of mine; but to return all that are now in circulation to me, for immediate payment, in order to prevent fraud and imposition by the said Catherine White. And I do hereby further caution the Public against giving credit to my said wife, as I will not be responsible for any debt or debts she may contract.”

It seems within a year Catherine had saved enough money for her passage home and no furtehr record of her in the colony appears after the following notice of her intended departure in 1809:

The Sydney Gazette, Sunday 8 October 1809 p.2
“Notice is hereby given, that the undermentioned Persons have obtained His Honor the Lieutenant Governor’s Permission to go as Passengers in the Mary Ann :
Mr. O’Connor   Ellen O’Connor
Mr. Williaim Gough Mary Gough
Sarah Hesley   Mr James Dixon
Mr. William Emmett Mr. Thomas Green
Sarah Green   John Doyle
John Petty   Joseph Eyms
Jane Rhynd   Catherine Mellon
Sarah Bell and Child Sarah Sibery
[per] Captain Bishop”

D Wong on 21st March, 2019 wrote of John Connor:

John Connor was 28 years old on arrival.
Native Place: Cork.

Sick List of the Southworth:
John Connor, aged 23, convict; disease or hurt, plethoric habit of body. Put on sick list, 28 October 1821 at the Cove of Cork. Discharged 6 November 1821 cured.
**Note the age difference**

Colonial Secretary Papers:
CONNOR, John. Per “Southworth”, 1822

1823 May 21:  On lists of prisoners transported to Port Macquarie per “Lady Nelson” (Reel 6019; 4/3864 pp.48, 408-9)

Wendy Smith on 21st March, 2019 wrote of Martin Hennessy:

Servant to Mr John Hunt, Storekeeper, Queanbeyan.  Died of Natural Causes and is buried in the Oaks Estate Burial Ground.  Reference; Queanbeyan Pioneer Cemeteries Volume 1 page 7

John Hopkinson on 21st March, 2019 wrote of George Brassington:

George Brassington and other Pentrich Revolutionaries were given an absolute pardon in 1835 after a petition to the British Home Office on 2nd August 1834 from some of the Derbyshire magistrates and Members of Parliament. (source British National Archives)

Nicole Eliazabeth New on 20th March, 2019 wrote of Margaret Darnall:

Cathy Dunn, ‘Marriages November 1791 Norfolk Island’, Australian History Research, http://www.australianhistoryresearch.info/marriages-november-1791-norfolk-island/, accessed 20/03/2019 lists 100 marriages performed by Reverend Richard Johnson on visit to Norfolk Island in November 1791, one being Cavanough, Owen to Darling, Margaret.

D Wong on 20th March, 2019 wrote of Ann Thompson:

Ann Thompson was listed as 22 years old on arrival - (from her indent on https://www.records.nsw.gov.au)

After her arrival, Ann began a relationship with Thomas Davies/Davis, an officer of the NSW Corp.  Thomas arrived on the ‘Gorgon 1791’.  He enlisted in the NSW Corp 28/6/1793 as a ensign.
20/12/1797: Daughter Mary Ann born Sydney.
Mary Ann died and was buried 17/8/1802.
7/10/1803: Daughter Susannah was born, Sydney.

Soon after his arrival in NSW aboard the ‘Duke of Portland, 1807’ Ann began a relationship with John Bellinger/Billinger.
1809: Daugher Elizabeth born.

C1805: They moved to Norfolk Island, Susannah died there.
Thomas then died 21/1/1806, after a long illness.  Thomas was buried at the Old Sydney Burial Ground.

Ann next lived with or was employed by John Whitter/Whitear/Whitten who arrived per ‘William and Ann 1791’.

1806 Census: Ann is described as a concubine, living with John and one natural female child.

23/8/1807: John Whitear assigned his house in Bell Row to Ann Thompson before he departed on the ship ‘Lucy’.

15/7/1809: Ann had a daughter, Elizabeth, with John Bellinger.

Feb. 1812: John and Ann left Sydney for Hobart Town per ‘Ruby’.
Ann was pregnant on the journey and on 26/6/1812 christened another child, Charles, in Hobart Town - Charles was recorded in the name of Billinger.

John Bellinger was granted 42 acres in the Glenorchy district in 1813, and the family were based at Glenorchy for the next 20 years.

John Bellinger died in 1833.

29/7/1860: Ann Thompson died at Forcett, Tasmania, aged 87.

Wendy Smith on 20th March, 2019 wrote of Edward Holmes:

UK Prison Hulk Register and letters book on the Justitia moored at Woolwich in 1835.  Offence written but not easy to work out.  NSW Convict Muster in 1837 were Edward Holmes assigned to Mr G. T. Palmer at Sydney while the Convict Index indicates that Edward Holmes is from Yorkshire, aged 24 and is single.  He was assigned to Captain A. T. Faunce.  He is buried at the Oaks Estate burial ground.

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