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Recent Submissions

D Wong on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Samuel Oldfield:

Derby Mercury Derbyshire, England
26 Mar 1818:
ASSIZES
Benjamin Warhurst and Samuel Oldfield, for breaking into the dwelling house of John Hudson, at Tideswell, and stealing a quantity of cloth.

Benjamin Warhurst was also on board.

Samuel Oldfield was listed as 26 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Macclesfield, Cheshire.

Samuel was 5’3½” tall, dark sallow complexion, brown hair, grey eyes.

31/8/1830: TOL Hawkesbury.
30/4/1840: Port Macquarie - in lieu of TOL dated 1830, destroyed.

9/9/1840: Convict Death Register - Samuel Oldfield died at Port Macquarie.

D Wong on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Benjamin Warhurst:

Derby Mercury Derbyshire, England
26 Mar 1818:
ASSIZES
Benjamin Warhurst and Samuel Oldfield, for breaking into the dwelling house of John Hudson, at Tideswell, and stealing a quantity of cloth.

Samuel Oldfield was also on board.

Benjamin Warhurst was listed as 23 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Macclesfield.

Benjamin was 5’9” tall, florid complexion, brown hair, hazel eyes.

Colonial Secretary Index:
WARHURST, Benjamin

1821 Dec 15:  Volunteer at Port Macquarie; drowned (Reel 6068; 4/1815 pp.39-40)

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Louisa Thursfield:

Absconded
2 Thursfield ex Wiltshire, Louisa, Grenada,
Servant, 20, Sunderland, 5 feet 5½, hazel eyes,
black hair, brown freckled camp, from her husband R. Wiltshire, Sydney.
Sydney Gazette, 11 Feb 1828.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Mary Ann Johnson:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 23 February 2020), December 1823, trial of JOHANNA LAWSON MARY ANN JOHNSON (t18231203-172).
JOHANNA LAWSON, MARY ANN JOHNSON, Theft > grand larceny, Theft > grand larceny, Theft > grand larceny, 3rd December 1823.

174. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , an opera glass, value 4 s.; a box, value 2 d.; and thirty-two weights, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Gill .

SAMUEL GILL . I am a broker , and live in Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came to my shop to look at some damaged china. These things were on a night-table, by the door. They were about a quarter of an hour in the shop, looking at china, but bought nothing; and in two hours the officer called, and produced an opera glass and a box of weights, which I am certain are mine. I had not seen them myself that day.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am street-keeper to the Foundling estate. On the 18th of November I stopped the prisoners in Spelder-street, and took them to the watch-house. Johnson wished a woman to search him, and the woman found this opera glass and weights in a large pocket which she had before her. She said the weights were brought from the East Indies by her brother, and the opera glass was her own, and she was going to sell it. Lawson said they did belong to her, and that she knew her brother gave them to her.

Cross-examined by MR. GORDON. Q. Was Lawson searched - A. Yes. Lawson said Johnson told her she had them from her brother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON’S Defence. We were both together - one is equally as much in fault as the other.

LAWSON - NOT GUILTY .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

175. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a table-cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of John Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of John Davis . We live in Crown-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came into the shop to buy some bonnets - looked at some, but the price would not suit - they left without buying anything. This table-cloth was on the table with the bonnets. Cadby brought it to me in half an hour.

JOSEPH CADBY . I found this table-cloth in Johnson’s apron. Lawson said it was her’s, and she was going to pawn it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAWSON’S Defence. I stood outside the door, and did not know that she had anything; when she came out she shewed me a time-piece.

MRS. DAVIS. They both came into the shop. Lawson handed the bonnets to Johnson to look at.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

176. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a time-piece stand, value 18 d. , the goods of William Alexander .

ANN ALEXANDER . I am the daughter of William Alexander , who keeps a broker’s shop , in Tunbridge-street, Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, between one and two o’clock, the prisoners came and asked if we had any damaged plates - I said No; and they looked at some damaged crockery; and in about a quarter of an hour after they left, Cadby brought this time-piece stand, which I had not missed. It was safe half an hour before.

JOSEPH CADBY . I stopped them twelve doors from Alexander’s, and found this time-piece stand in Lawson’s apron. She said it was her own, and she was going to get it gilded.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Johanna Lawson:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 23 February 2020), December 1823, trial of JOHANNA LAWSON MARY ANN JOHNSON (t18231203-172).
JOHANNA LAWSON, MARY ANN JOHNSON, Theft > grand larceny, Theft > grand larceny, Theft > grand larceny, 3rd December 1823.

174. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , an opera glass, value 4 s.; a box, value 2 d.; and thirty-two weights, value 1 s. , the goods of Samuel Gill .

SAMUEL GILL . I am a broker , and live in Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came to my shop to look at some damaged china. These things were on a night-table, by the door. They were about a quarter of an hour in the shop, looking at china, but bought nothing; and in two hours the officer called, and produced an opera glass and a box of weights, which I am certain are mine. I had not seen them myself that day.

JOSEPH CADBY . I am street-keeper to the Foundling estate. On the 18th of November I stopped the prisoners in Spelder-street, and took them to the watch-house. Johnson wished a woman to search him, and the woman found this opera glass and weights in a large pocket which she had before her. She said the weights were brought from the East Indies by her brother, and the opera glass was her own, and she was going to sell it. Lawson said they did belong to her, and that she knew her brother gave them to her.

Cross-examined by MR. GORDON. Q. Was Lawson searched - A. Yes. Lawson said Johnson told her she had them from her brother.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

JOHNSON’S Defence. We were both together - one is equally as much in fault as the other.

LAWSON - NOT GUILTY .

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

175. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a table-cloth, value 4 s. , the goods of John Davis .

ELIZABETH DAVIS . I am the wife of John Davis . We live in Crown-street . On the 18th of November, the prisoners came into the shop to buy some bonnets - looked at some, but the price would not suit - they left without buying anything. This table-cloth was on the table with the bonnets. Cadby brought it to me in half an hour.

JOSEPH CADBY . I found this table-cloth in Johnson’s apron. Lawson said it was her’s, and she was going to pawn it.

(Property produced and sworn to.)

LAWSON’S Defence. I stood outside the door, and did not know that she had anything; when she came out she shewed me a time-piece.

MRS. DAVIS. They both came into the shop. Lawson handed the bonnets to Johnson to look at.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

176. JOHANNA LAWSON and MARY ANN JOHNSON were again indicted for stealing, on the 18th of November , a time-piece stand, value 18 d. , the goods of William Alexander .

ANN ALEXANDER . I am the daughter of William Alexander , who keeps a broker’s shop , in Tunbridge-street, Cromer-street . On the 18th of November, between one and two o’clock, the prisoners came and asked if we had any damaged plates - I said No; and they looked at some damaged crockery; and in about a quarter of an hour after they left, Cadby brought this time-piece stand, which I had not missed. It was safe half an hour before.

JOSEPH CADBY . I stopped them twelve doors from Alexander’s, and found this time-piece stand in Lawson’s apron. She said it was her own, and she was going to get it gilded.

LAWSON - GUILTY . Aged 19.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

—————————————————————
Absconded Prisoner
1. Lawson Johanna, Grenada, 21, London, 5 feet 3,
chesnut eyes, dark brown eyes, fair comp. from Female Factory, Parramatta.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Cahill:

Irish Convict Database by Peter Mayberry.
Elizabeth Cahill,  age 24, per ship Southworth (3) 1832; tried at Kilkenny, 1831, 7 years, for vagrancy,  single, catholic, Native of Kilkenny Co., trade: kitchen maid, D.O.B. 1808.

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM 1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
956. Cahill Elizabeth, Southworth, housemaid, to Sarah Pickering, 38, Pitt-street, Sydney
———————————————————————-

Sydney Monitor 15 Jun 1840
Certificates of Freedom:
Cahill Elizabeth, Southworth (2) ;

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Sarah Robinson:

Sydney Monitor 15 Jun 1840
Certificates of Freedom:
Robinson Sarah alias Smith alias O’Donnell, Southworth (2);

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Mary Doyle:

Irish Convict Database by Peter Mayberry.
Mary Doyle,  age 46, per ship Southworth (3) 1832; tried at Dublin, 1831, 7 years, for stealing handkerchiefs, Former convictions: 9 months, 9 months, 18 months. married 2 children, catholic, Native of Wexford, trade: house maid laundress needlewoman, D.O.B. 1786. Colonial sentence.

Moreton Bay convicts:
Mary Doyle Southworth 2, Convicted at Dublin City, 4 Mar 1831, Grand Larceny, 7 years. Trade: servant. Colonial Sentence: Qr Sessions Sydney, 19 Oct 1835, Larceny, Sentence 3 years. To Sydney 26 Oct 1838. Description: native of Dublin, age 51, 4ft 1; pale complexion, l. brown hair, blue eyes, catholic.

SYDNEY QUARTER SESSIONS
Mary Doyle, a runaway, was charged with stealing a watch from one John Perry. Guilty, three years to a penal settlement.
Sydney Gazette, 20 Oct 1835.

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM 1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
972. Doyle Mary, Southworth, housemaid, to Mrs. Smith, Pitt-street, Sydney

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Mary Kavangh:

Mary Kavanagh was sent to Moreton Bay after a colonial conviction.

Moreton Bay convicts:
Mary Kavanagh convicted as Walls, Southworth 2, Convicted at Wexford, 11 Mar 1830, 7 years, Offence – stealing a hankf. Trade- servant. Colonial Sentence: Qr Sessions Sydney, 19 Oct 1835, Larceny, Sentence 3 years. To Sydney 26 Oct 1838. Description: Mary Wall, native of Wexford, age 34, 5ft 1 ½ . Sallow complexion, brown hair, hazle eyes, catholic.

————————————————————————-
SYDNEY QUARTER SESSIONS
Mary Wall, assigned to her husband, stood indicted for stealing from the shop of Mr. John Weiss, Haberdasher, George-street, one piece of ribbon of the value of 30s.. Guilty-The prisoner called on two or three persons as to character, which called forth some very pertinent remarks from the Chairman, as to” the system” of character which had prevailed, in the case of persons arraigned for felonies in that Court; to such a pitch, was it carried in general as to be quite a burlesque on character. The practice of shop-lifting was becoming of so frequent occurrence, that it was necessary to make an example. Sentenced to be transported to a Penal Settlement for three years. Sydney Herald. 22 Oct 1835.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Jane Tate:

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM 1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1118. Tate Jane, Southworth, housemaid, to William Sheed, O’Connel-street, Sydney

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Ann Walker:

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1129. Walker Ann, Southworth, housemaid, to Francis Oakes, Parramatta.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Mary Nowlan:

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1076. Nowlan Mary, Southworth, nursemaid, to Ann Hermingham, York-street, Sydney

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Mary Moore:

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1060. Moore Mary, Southworth, housemaid, to Joseph Payne, Macquarie Place.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Bell Vallally:

Irish Convict Database by Peter Mayberry.
Bell Vallaly, alias Isabel Vallaly Isabella Vallaly, age 22, per ship Southworth (3) 1832; tried at Antrim, 1831, 7 years, for stealing watch, single, catholic, Native of Armagh, trade: all work, D.O.B. 1810.
———————————————————————

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1121. Vallally Bell, Southworth, allwork, to J. H. Plunkett, Royal Hotel

—————————————————————-
Runaways apprehended up to the 23rd July:
Vallally Bell, Southworth, from Mr. J. H. Plunkett, Sydney.
Sydney Gazette, 26 July 1832.
————————————————————————————
Certificate of Freedom
Vallaby Bell Southworth 2
Sydney Gazette, 23 Apr 1839.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Bridget Lehane:

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1028. Lehane Bridget, Southworth, allwork, to Sarah Robinson, George-street, Sydney.

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Anne Jennings:

Irish Convict Database by Peter Mayberry.
Anne Jennings, age 20, per ship Southworth (3) 1832; tried at Limerick, 1831, 7 years, for stealing cotton, single, catholic, Native of Mayo Co., trade: all work, D.O.B. 1812.

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
1010. Jenning Ann, Southworth, allwork, to W. Spooner, Sydney

Maureen Withey on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Jane Dillon:

Irish Convict Database by Peter Mayberry.
Jane Dillon, age 23, per ship Southworth (3) 1832; tried at Dublin, 1830, 7 years, for stealing calico, single, catholic, Native of Kings Co., trade: Cook all work, D.O.B. 1809.

LIST OF FEMALE CONVICTS ASSIGNED FROM
1st TO 30th JUNE, 1832.
970. Dillon Jane, Southworth, cook, to John Black, George-street, Sydney.

D Wong on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Elizabeth Warhurst:

Elizabeth Warhurst was listed as 16 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Manchester.

Elizabeth was 5’4¾” tall, fresh fair complexion, sandy flaxen hair, hazel eyes, well looking.

Assigned to M. D. Meares, Windsor.

7/5/1829: Permission to marry Patrick Donnelly (Medina 1823) - Patrick was 25 and had a TOL - Elizabeth was 18 and on Bond.

1829: Married at the Church of England, Abercrombie District, Bathurst.  Elizabeth listed as Walhurst on the NSW BDM.
No children listed.

16/1/1834: Certificate of Freedom.

D Wong on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Patrick Donnelly:

Patrick Donnelly was listed as 20 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Dublin.

Occupation: Fence thatcher.

Patrick was 5’4” tall, brown and freckled complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes.

Colonial Secretary Index:
DONNELLY, Patrick. Per “Medina”, 1823

1824 Jan 6:  On list of convicts landed from the “Medina” and forwarded to Bathurst for distribution (Reel 6012; 4/3510 p.133)

1824 Apr 10:  On list of prisoners on establishment at Bathurst with sentences not transmitted (Reel 6028; 2/8283 p.102)

????: TOL Bathurst
11/5/1830: COF

D Wong on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of John Alexander:

Occupation: carter and thatcher.

Transported for ‘cart robbery’.

John Alexander was listed as 21 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Dublin.

John was 5’8¾” tall, heavy complexion, grey eyes, brown hair, very well.

25/11/1832: married Ann Clark at St. Mary’s, Sydney.
3 children:
Margaret Celia,
Ann
Joseph.

Lived at The Rocks, Sydney.

Chris Jenkins on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Jane Jones:

Joseph’s widow Jane remarried the same year as his death.
Joseph Henry COPPOCK and Jane RANDALL were married on 5 Sep 1838 in Trinity Church Bathurst (Kelso), New South Wales, Australia.8,72 Jane RANDALL (daughter of Living and Living) was born before 29 Apr 1816.75,76 Keyser Family Tree (Ancestry.com) gives Jane Jones, b 1813 Shropshire. I00064.
She was baptized on 29 Apr 1816 in St Alkmund, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.72,76 She died on 17 Oct 1879 in Long Swamp, Orange, New South Wales, Australia.72,76

On 12 January 1835 Jane, known as Jones because see had married a William Jones in St Peter’s Liverpool Lancashire England, was tried at Lancashire (Liverpool) Quarter Sessions for man robbery and sentenced to 14 years’ transportation. It was her first conviction. Jane arrived in Australia on 6 September 1835 on the ship “Mary III” which sailed from London on 16 April 1835, a sea voyage of about four and a half months. (About the ship: Fifth trip, barque 365 tons. Built at Ipswich 1811 AEl Class. Master: Wm Ascough. Surgeon: John Inches. Embarked 180 females, relanded 2, 1 died, landed 177 females.) Upon arrival in Australia, Jane Jones was sent to Bathurst, as the assigned servant of Mr Parker at Dunn’s Plains.

Age on arrival in Australia: 20
Native place: Shropshire
Education: Nil
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Kitchen maid
Physical aspects: 4ft 10-1/2 ins in height; fair to ruddy and freckled complexion; brown hair; hazel eyes
Identifying marks: 11, two stars, heart, ERW, M’c, anchor on upper arm; small lump and scar on right wrist; scar back of little finger on left hand.
(from the Indent to Convicts, 1835, NSW State Archives)

In the 1837 Muster, Jane Jones is recorded as working for master John Brown at Bathurst. Banns for the marriage of Jane Jones (“Mary”, 1835, 14 years, bond, present service Mr Parker, Bathurst), and Isaac Peach, 28 widower, free, were posted previous to July 1838. Disallowed. Authorities were not apparently satisfied that Mr Peach was in fact a widower, because he had stated on arrival that he was married with one child. Jane presumably declared her status as a spinster despite her previous marriage and whether or not William was still living! Jane lost no time in finding a replacement prospect as a husband. Women were scarce in those days, and there were always plenty of men wanting to marry the eligible females.

Chris Jenkins on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Coppock:

Joseph Henry COPPOCK was born on 30 Mar 1811 in Union Court, Holborn, Middlesex.8,68,69 Place of brith does not appear in IGI records. Possibly appears in the parish register for baptisms at St Andrews, Holborn. He was baptized on 21 Jun 1812 in St Andrew, Holborn, City of London.68,70 In 1829 he was a Horse Hair Weaver.Trial Surrey 1829. 7 years, 20 years old.  71 Between 1829 and 1838 he was a Convict Labourer.72 He was transported, arrived 1320 in 1829 in Australia.73 on Katherine S. Forbes. In 1849 he was a Settler & Stockkeeper.72 He died on 11 Jan 1866 near Cadia, New South Wales, Australia.8,74

Joseph was convicted for picking pockets at the Adjourned Surrey Quarter Sessions at Newington, London 20/7/1829 & transported for seven years being his first conviction. He had been committed, along with his partner in crime John Cantlon, on 4 July 1829, by J T Hone Esq, charged on the oaths of George Buckmaster Gibbons and others, “with feloniously stealing, at Saint Saviour, a silk handkerchief, his property.”

James was held pending his trial and sentencing at Horsemonger Lane Gaol. The lane took its name from “Horsemonger lande” in possession of St Thomas’s Hospital, then in Southwark, in 1536. The jail was erected at the suggestion of John Howard, from the designs of Geo Gwilt, under provisions of an Act passed in 1791, and was completed in 1798. The building consisted of a quadrangle of three stories. Three of the sides were appropriated to criminals, the fourth to debtors. Provision was made for 400 prisoners, the wall enclosing an area of about 3-1/2 acres.

The following excerpt is taken from “The London Encyclopaedia “, 1991, describing Horsemonger Lane Gaol: Built as a model prison by George Gwilt in 1791-9. Public executions used to take place outside. It was here in November 1849 that Dickens attended the hangings of Mr and Mrs Manning who killed a friend for his money and buried him under the kitchen floor. He wrote to The Times, “I do not believe that any community can prosper where such a scene of horror as was enacted this morning outside Horsemonger Lane Gaol is permitted. The horrors of the gibbet and of the crime which brought the wretched murderers to it faded in my mind before the atrocious bearing, looks & language of the assembled spectators.” In 1813-15 Leigh Hunt was imprisoned here for a libel on the Prince Regent, whom he called “a fat Adonis of forty”. Byron met Hunt here for the first time. The gaol was closed in 1878 and demolished in 1880. Newington Recreation Ground marks the site.

Morning Chronicle 21/7/1829: Surrey Sessions - Monday

Two young men, named JOHN CAMPTON & JOSEPH COPPOCK, were tried & sentenced to be transported for seven years each, for stealing a silk handkerchief from the person of George Gibbons. After sentence had been passed, Campton, on retiring from the bar, struck Coppock a desperate blow on the face with his fist. The Chairman being witness of the outrage committed in Court, ordered him to be brought back to the bar, & sentenced him to be transported for life. [from Alison Coppock]

The File of Indictments (ref. QS2/7/1829, entry no. 270, held by the Surrey County Council Archives): Coppock’s accomplice was John CANTLON, they were lately of “St George the Martyr in the Borough of Southwark” & the value of the handkerchief was 4 shillings. [Alison Coppock]

(From 1718 to 1783, about 50,000 British criminals were transported to British colonies in America. With the American War of Independence in 1775-1783, hostilities with Britain brought transportation to an end. British prisons and hulks (derelict ships left to rot in the Thames River) began to over-flow. Then, in 1786, the colony of New South Wales was proclaimed by King George III, the east coast of Australia first having been mapped by Captain James Cook on his epic voyage of discovery in 1776. On 23 January 1787, the British parliament informed Lord Sydney agreed to send convicts to New South Wales. The eleven ships of the First Fleet left Portsmouth on 13 May 1787, under the command of Captain Arthur Phillip. The Fleet arrived in Botany Bay on 18 January 1788, but the landing party was not impressed with the site, and moved the fleet to Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour), and settled in Sydney Cove on 26 January 1788. From the arrival of the First Fleet In 1788, to the end of the transportation system in 1868, over 160,000 convicts, men, women and children, were transported to Australia. The exact number is not known, and many died on the voyage, which was undertaken in terrible conditions.)

Joseph Coppock arrived in Australia on 18 February 1830 on the ship “Katherine Stewart Forbes” which had left Spithead (England) on 14 October 1829. (About the Katherine Stewart Forbes: First voyage. Ship was 457 tons, built at North Fleet 1818. Class El Master: Jos. Grote; Surgeon: Jas Gilchrist. Sailed 2 October 1929 from Dublin, to Spithead and thence to Sydney. Carried 200 males, 1 death, landed 199 males in Sydney.) Upon arrival in Australia he was assigned to R J Allen at Lake George.

Age on arrival in Australia: 20
Native place: London
Education: Could read and write
Marital status: Single
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Horsehair weaving
Physical aspects: 5ft 4 ins in height; fair to ruddy complexion; brown hair; blue eyes
Identifying marks: Sun, moon, stars, anchor and man on right arm; mermaid, fish, I.C., July 20 1829, JC on left arm.
(from the Indent to Convicts, 1830, NSW State Archives)

In the 1837 Muster, Joseph Coppock was listed as “came on Katherine Stewart Forbes”, 1830, age 25, Road Party, Vale of Clwydd (near Lithgow). Road parties were groups of men, ex-convicts and other labourers, working on roadworks in the colony. Road gangs also worked on the road, consisting of men who were still serving their time, and they would have to work with their fetters and chains on. There was quite a large program of road building at this time in the colony’s history, as the government was keen to open up the farming areas to the north and west of Sydney.

In 1838 Joseph was free by servitude, in service to Mr Parker at Dunn’s Plains (on the Campbell River near Rockley), where he met Jane Jones. Joseph applied to marry Jane on 3 July 1838. Permission was necessary as Jane was still a convict. From a List of persons applying for the Publication of Banns at Bathurst: Joseph Coppock, 26, bachelor (“Katherine Stewart Forbes” from Spithead, 1830), free, sentence 7 years, present service Mr Parker & Jane Jones, 23, spinster (“Mary III” 5/1835) bond sentence 14 years, present service Mr Parker. On 19 June 1838 Mr Parker gave his approval to the marriage of Joseph Coppock and Jane Jones, as follows: “I hereby give my consent to the withnamed prisoner of the Crown being married, she being my assigned servant”. J Parker. On 3 July 1838, Reverend Walpole, Trinity Church, Bathurst (now Kelso) married Joseph Coppock and Jane Jones. (Register of Convicts’ Applications to Marry January 1838 - March 1841, NSW State Archives). According to the recollections of Florence Workman, nee Coppock (granddaughter of Joseph and Jane), Joseph was an Irish Londoner and Jane was Welsh.

In 1841 the family were still living at Bathurst, but by the time Betsy, Mary Ann, Eliza, John, Jane, were all baptised on 8 April 1849 at Orange (in the Parish of Carcoar, County Bathurst) the family had moved to Flyer’s Creek where Joseph was a settler and stockkeeper. In November 1846, the Government Gazette (p1516) listed an unclaimed letter for Jane Coppock at the Sydney general post office. Joseph - listed as Henry Coppock - purchased land from the Government on 23 July 1856 in the County of Bathurst, Parish of Waldergrove. The land consisted of 30 acres 3 chains, the block was stated to be at Carcoar. He paid the sum of forty one pounds ten shillings and threepence to the Colonial Treasury. The land was a Conditional Purchase under the Old Titles Act, which meant that it was held by Joseph and his heirs in perpetuity but was still nominally owned by the government and was actually a perpetual lease. If it wished, the Government could demand the rent of one peppercorn. The grant commenced on Flyer’s Creek at the North Eastern corner of an unassigned portion of thirty acres two roods and bounded on the South by the Northern boundary of that land being in a line bearing west thirty one chains fifty links; on the west by a line bearing North ten chains; on the North by a line bearing East to Flyer’s Creek thirty two chains fifty links; and on the East by that creek downwards to the North East corner of the thirty acres two roods aforesaid. Exclusively of a road, one chain wide, passing through this land from a point twenty four chains East from its North Western corner the area of which has been deducted from the total area. Being the land sold as Lot 22 in pursuance of this proclamation of 9 June 1856. The land purchase was signed by the Governor General, Sir William Thomas Denison Knight Commander of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, dated 4 December 1856. Recorded by the Supreme Court 3 February 1857.

The Coppocks remained there in the Parish of Waldergrove, variously stated to be Carcoar, Cadia or Orange as the district changed. They were still there in 1860 when daughter Mary Ann married. The lease continued to be renewed through to 1864 when Joseph, now aged about 54, sold the land to his son Joseph Jnr. Joseph Snr also purchased land from Thomas Leach, paying 35 Pounds, and made this over to Joseph at the same time. The indenture for the change of title was signed by Joseph. Flyer’s or Errowinbal Creek, rises in the South east of Canobolas cluster of hills, flowing about 18 miles through rough scrub country, with tolerably good alluvial ground on the west bank. A good poor man’s diggings (that is, a small amount of gold was to be found) at one time existed on this creek. In 1860 the population of the whole district of Orange municipality was 2,000. In 1860 Mrs Coppock was witness at the baptism of Thomas, son of neighbours William and Mary Ann Garvin, on 18 February.

The year 1866 was a very eventful one for the Coppock family. On 11 January Joseph died; his death certificate shows that he was a farmer living near Cadia aged 56, he died of bronchitis and asthma having been ill for six weeks. The Doctor was I. Daniel, Joseph was buried in Orange Cemetery (D024 - there is no marker on the grave); the informant was Henry Hunt, friend (and husband of Jane Coppock); and witnesses T. Reynolds and H. Coppock. Also in 1866, about a week before Joseph’s death, Joseph and Jane’s fourth daughter, Jane, married Henry Hunt. Their son Joshua was born that year and named for Henry’s brother, who was married to Mary Ann Coppock. Joseph’s widow Jane remarried the same year as his death.
Joseph Henry COPPOCK and Jane RANDALL were married on 5 Sep 1838 in Trinity Church Bathurst (Kelso), New South Wales, Australia.8,72 Jane RANDALL (daughter of Living and Living) was born before 29 Apr 1816.75,76 Keyser Family Tree (Ancestry.com) gives Jane Jones, b 1813 Shropshire. I00064.
She was baptized on 29 Apr 1816 in St Alkmund, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.72,76 She died on 17 Oct 1879 in Long Swamp, Orange, New South Wales, Australia.72,76

On 12 January 1835 Jane, known as Jones because see had married a William Jones in St Peter’s Liverpool Lancashire England, was tried at Lancashire (Liverpool) Quarter Sessions for man robbery and sentenced to 14 years’ transportation. It was her first conviction. Jane arrived in Australia on 6 September 1835 on the ship “Mary III” which sailed from London on 16 April 1835, a sea voyage of about four and a half months. (About the ship: Fifth trip, barque 365 tons. Built at Ipswich 1811 AEl Class. Master: Wm Ascough. Surgeon: John Inches. Embarked 180 females, relanded 2, 1 died, landed 177 females.) Upon arrival in Australia, Jane Jones was sent to Bathurst, as the assigned servant of Mr Parker at Dunn’s Plains.

Age on arrival in Australia: 20
Native place: Shropshire
Education: Nil
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Kitchen maid
Physical aspects: 4ft 10-1/2 ins in height; fair to ruddy and freckled complexion; brown hair; hazel eyes
Identifying marks: 11, two stars, heart, ERW, M’c, anchor on upper arm; small lump and scar on right wrist; scar back of little finger on left hand.
(from the Indent to Convicts, 1835, NSW State Archives)

In the 1837 Muster, Jane Jones is recorded as working for master John Brown at Bathurst. Banns for the marriage of Jane Jones (“Mary”, 1835, 14 years, bond, present service Mr Parker, Bathurst), and Isaac Peach, 28 widower, free, were posted previous to July 1838. Disallowed. Authorities were not apparently satisfied that Mr Peach was in fact a widower, because he had stated on arrival that he was married with one child. Jane presumably declared her status as a spinster despite her previous marriage and whether or not William was still living! Jane lost no time in finding a replacement prospect as a husband. Women were scarce in those days, and there were always plenty of men wanting to marry the eligible females.

In November 1846 the Government Gazette (p1516) listed an unclaimed letter for Jane Coppock at the Sydney general post office. Jane did not mourn Joseph for long after he died in January 1866. She married on 23 July 1866 to David White; on the marriage certificate she is recorded as being a widow, age 53, of Long Swamp, parents John Randall (gardener) and Elizabeth Owen. David White (labourer of Long Swamp) is recorded as being a widower, born Scotland, parents David and Clementine White. Witnesses were Samuel Walsh and Mary Ann Hunt, her daughter. Jane and David continued to live at Flyer’s creek until her death on 17 October 1879 at Long Swamp, Orange, where she may have been at the home of Mary Ann. Jane died of dropsy (congestive heart failure) having been ill for seven months. She was 66 years old. The Walsh brothers, her son-in-law James and his brother Samuel were witnesses at the burial in Orange Cemetery (grave D022). William Scarr was the informant. He was a friend who later married Mary Jane Hunt, Jane’s grand daughter (the daughter of Mary Ann and Joshua Hunt). Joseph Henry COPPOCK and Jane RANDALL had the following children:
24 i. Margaret COPPOCK was born on 2 Jun 1850 in Cadia New South Wales Australia.72

+25 ii. Elizabeth (Betsy) COPPOCK.

+26 iii. Mary Ann COPPOCK.

+27 iv. Eliza COPPOCK.

+28 v. John COPPOCK.

+29 vi. Jane COPPOCK.

+30 vii. Margaret COPPOCK.

+31 viii. Joseph COPPOCK.

32 ix. Joanna COPPOCK was born on 4 Mar 1853.72,77

+33 x. William Henry COPPOCK.

+34 xi. George COPPOCK.

Chris Jenkins on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of Joseph Coppock:

Joseph Henry COPPOCK was born on 30 Mar 1811 in Union Court, Holborn, Middlesex.8,68,69 Place of brith does not appear in IGI records. Possibly appears in the parish register for baptisms at St Andrews, Holborn. He was baptized on 21 Jun 1812 in St Andrew, Holborn, City of London.68,70 In 1829 he was a Horse Hair Weaver.Trial Surrey 1829. 7 years, 20 years old.  71 Between 1829 and 1838 he was a Convict Labourer.72 He was transported, arrived 1320 in 1829 in Australia.73 on Katherine S. Forbes. In 1849 he was a Settler & Stockkeeper.72 He died on 11 Jan 1866 near Cadia, New South Wales, Australia.8,74

Joseph was convicted for picking pockets at the Adjourned Surrey Quarter Sessions at Newington, London 20/7/1829 & transported for seven years being his first conviction. He had been committed, along with his partner in crime John Cantlon, on 4 July 1829, by J T Hone Esq, charged on the oaths of George Buckmaster Gibbons and others, “with feloniously stealing, at Saint Saviour, a silk handkerchief, his property.”

James was held pending his trial and sentencing at Horsemonger Lane Gaol. The lane took its name from “Horsemonger lande” in possession of St Thomas’s Hospital, then in Southwark, in 1536. The jail was erected at the suggestion of John Howard, from the designs of Geo Gwilt, under provisions of an Act passed in 1791, and was completed in 1798. The building consisted of a quadrangle of three stories. Three of the sides were appropriated to criminals, the fourth to debtors. Provision was made for 400 prisoners, the wall enclosing an area of about 3-1/2 acres.

The following excerpt is taken from “The London Encyclopaedia “, 1991, describing Horsemonger Lane Gaol: Built as a model prison by George Gwilt in 1791-9. Public executions used to take place outside. It was here in November 1849 that Dickens attended the hangings of Mr and Mrs Manning who killed a friend for his money and buried him under the kitchen floor. He wrote to The Times, “I do not believe that any community can prosper where such a scene of horror as was enacted this morning outside Horsemonger Lane Gaol is permitted. The horrors of the gibbet and of the crime which brought the wretched murderers to it faded in my mind before the atrocious bearing, looks & language of the assembled spectators.” In 1813-15 Leigh Hunt was imprisoned here for a libel on the Prince Regent, whom he called “a fat Adonis of forty”. Byron met Hunt here for the first time. The gaol was closed in 1878 and demolished in 1880. Newington Recreation Ground marks the site.

Morning Chronicle 21/7/1829: Surrey Sessions - Monday

Two young men, named JOHN CAMPTON & JOSEPH COPPOCK, were tried & sentenced to be transported for seven years each, for stealing a silk handkerchief from the person of George Gibbons. After sentence had been passed, Campton, on retiring from the bar, struck Coppock a desperate blow on the face with his fist. The Chairman being witness of the outrage committed in Court, ordered him to be brought back to the bar, & sentenced him to be transported for life. [from Alison Coppock]

The File of Indictments (ref. QS2/7/1829, entry no. 270, held by the Surrey County Council Archives): Coppock’s accomplice was John CANTLON, they were lately of “St George the Martyr in the Borough of Southwark” & the value of the handkerchief was 4 shillings. [Alison Coppock]

(From 1718 to 1783, about 50,000 British criminals were transported to British colonies in America. With the American War of Independence in 1775-1783, hostilities with Britain brought transportation to an end. British prisons and hulks (derelict ships left to rot in the Thames River) began to over-flow. Then, in 1786, the colony of New South Wales was proclaimed by King George III, the east coast of Australia first having been mapped by Captain James Cook on his epic voyage of discovery in 1776. On 23 January 1787, the British parliament informed Lord Sydney agreed to send convicts to New South Wales. The eleven ships of the First Fleet left Portsmouth on 13 May 1787, under the command of Captain Arthur Phillip. The Fleet arrived in Botany Bay on 18 January 1788, but the landing party was not impressed with the site, and moved the fleet to Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour), and settled in Sydney Cove on 26 January 1788. From the arrival of the First Fleet In 1788, to the end of the transportation system in 1868, over 160,000 convicts, men, women and children, were transported to Australia. The exact number is not known, and many died on the voyage, which was undertaken in terrible conditions.)

Joseph Coppock arrived in Australia on 18 February 1830 on the ship “Katherine Stewart Forbes” which had left Spithead (England) on 14 October 1829. (About the Katherine Stewart Forbes: First voyage. Ship was 457 tons, built at North Fleet 1818. Class El Master: Jos. Grote; Surgeon: Jas Gilchrist. Sailed 2 October 1929 from Dublin, to Spithead and thence to Sydney. Carried 200 males, 1 death, landed 199 males in Sydney.) Upon arrival in Australia he was assigned to R J Allen at Lake George.

Age on arrival in Australia: 20
Native place: London
Education: Could read and write
Marital status: Single
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Horsehair weaving
Physical aspects: 5ft 4 ins in height; fair to ruddy complexion; brown hair; blue eyes
Identifying marks: Sun, moon, stars, anchor and man on right arm; mermaid, fish, I.C., July 20 1829, JC on left arm.
(from the Indent to Convicts, 1830, NSW State Archives)

In the 1837 Muster, Joseph Coppock was listed as “came on Katherine Stewart Forbes”, 1830, age 25, Road Party, Vale of Clwydd (near Lithgow). Road parties were groups of men, ex-convicts and other labourers, working on roadworks in the colony. Road gangs also worked on the road, consisting of men who were still serving their time, and they would have to work with their fetters and chains on. There was quite a large program of road building at this time in the colony’s history, as the government was keen to open up the farming areas to the north and west of Sydney.

In 1838 Joseph was free by servitude, in service to Mr Parker at Dunn’s Plains (on the Campbell River near Rockley), where he met Jane Jones. Joseph applied to marry Jane on 3 July 1838. Permission was necessary as Jane was still a convict. From a List of persons applying for the Publication of Banns at Bathurst: Joseph Coppock, 26, bachelor (“Katherine Stewart Forbes” from Spithead, 1830), free, sentence 7 years, present service Mr Parker & Jane Jones, 23, spinster (“Mary III” 5/1835) bond sentence 14 years, present service Mr Parker. On 19 June 1838 Mr Parker gave his approval to the marriage of Joseph Coppock and Jane Jones, as follows: “I hereby give my consent to the withnamed prisoner of the Crown being married, she being my assigned servant”. J Parker. On 3 July 1838, Reverend Walpole, Trinity Church, Bathurst (now Kelso) married Joseph Coppock and Jane Jones. (Register of Convicts’ Applications to Marry January 1838 - March 1841, NSW State Archives). According to the recollections of Florence Workman, nee Coppock (granddaughter of Joseph and Jane), Joseph was an Irish Londoner and Jane was Welsh.

In 1841 the family were still living at Bathurst, but by the time Betsy, Mary Ann, Eliza, John, Jane, were all baptised on 8 April 1849 at Orange (in the Parish of Carcoar, County Bathurst) the family had moved to Flyer’s Creek where Joseph was a settler and stockkeeper. In November 1846, the Government Gazette (p1516) listed an unclaimed letter for Jane Coppock at the Sydney general post office. Joseph - listed as Henry Coppock - purchased land from the Government on 23 July 1856 in the County of Bathurst, Parish of Waldergrove. The land consisted of 30 acres 3 chains, the block was stated to be at Carcoar. He paid the sum of forty one pounds ten shillings and threepence to the Colonial Treasury. The land was a Conditional Purchase under the Old Titles Act, which meant that it was held by Joseph and his heirs in perpetuity but was still nominally owned by the government and was actually a perpetual lease. If it wished, the Government could demand the rent of one peppercorn. The grant commenced on Flyer’s Creek at the North Eastern corner of an unassigned portion of thirty acres two roods and bounded on the South by the Northern boundary of that land being in a line bearing west thirty one chains fifty links; on the west by a line bearing North ten chains; on the North by a line bearing East to Flyer’s Creek thirty two chains fifty links; and on the East by that creek downwards to the North East corner of the thirty acres two roods aforesaid. Exclusively of a road, one chain wide, passing through this land from a point twenty four chains East from its North Western corner the area of which has been deducted from the total area. Being the land sold as Lot 22 in pursuance of this proclamation of 9 June 1856. The land purchase was signed by the Governor General, Sir William Thomas Denison Knight Commander of the Most Honorable Order of the Bath, dated 4 December 1856. Recorded by the Supreme Court 3 February 1857.

The Coppocks remained there in the Parish of Waldergrove, variously stated to be Carcoar, Cadia or Orange as the district changed. They were still there in 1860 when daughter Mary Ann married. The lease continued to be renewed through to 1864 when Joseph, now aged about 54, sold the land to his son Joseph Jnr. Joseph Snr also purchased land from Thomas Leach, paying 35 Pounds, and made this over to Joseph at the same time. The indenture for the change of title was signed by Joseph. Flyer’s or Errowinbal Creek, rises in the South east of Canobolas cluster of hills, flowing about 18 miles through rough scrub country, with tolerably good alluvial ground on the west bank. A good poor man’s diggings (that is, a small amount of gold was to be found) at one time existed on this creek. In 1860 the population of the whole district of Orange municipality was 2,000. In 1860 Mrs Coppock was witness at the baptism of Thomas, son of neighbours William and Mary Ann Garvin, on 18 February.

The year 1866 was a very eventful one for the Coppock family. On 11 January Joseph died; his death certificate shows that he was a farmer living near Cadia aged 56, he died of bronchitis and asthma having been ill for six weeks. The Doctor was I. Daniel, Joseph was buried in Orange Cemetery (D024 - there is no marker on the grave); the informant was Henry Hunt, friend (and husband of Jane Coppock); and witnesses T. Reynolds and H. Coppock. Also in 1866, about a week before Joseph’s death, Joseph and Jane’s fourth daughter, Jane, married Henry Hunt. Their son Joshua was born that year and named for Henry’s brother, who was married to Mary Ann Coppock. Joseph’s widow Jane remarried the same year as his death.
Joseph Henry COPPOCK and Jane RANDALL were married on 5 Sep 1838 in Trinity Church Bathurst (Kelso), New South Wales, Australia.8,72 Jane RANDALL (daughter of Living and Living) was born before 29 Apr 1816.75,76 Keyser Family Tree (Ancestry.com) gives Jane Jones, b 1813 Shropshire. I00064.
She was baptized on 29 Apr 1816 in St Alkmund, Shrewsbury, Shropshire.72,76 She died on 17 Oct 1879 in Long Swamp, Orange, New South Wales, Australia.72,76

On 12 January 1835 Jane, known as Jones because see had married a William Jones in St Peter’s Liverpool Lancashire England, was tried at Lancashire (Liverpool) Quarter Sessions for man robbery and sentenced to 14 years’ transportation. It was her first conviction. Jane arrived in Australia on 6 September 1835 on the ship “Mary III” which sailed from London on 16 April 1835, a sea voyage of about four and a half months. (About the ship: Fifth trip, barque 365 tons. Built at Ipswich 1811 AEl Class. Master: Wm Ascough. Surgeon: John Inches. Embarked 180 females, relanded 2, 1 died, landed 177 females.) Upon arrival in Australia, Jane Jones was sent to Bathurst, as the assigned servant of Mr Parker at Dunn’s Plains.

Age on arrival in Australia: 20
Native place: Shropshire
Education: Nil
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Kitchen maid
Physical aspects: 4ft 10-1/2 ins in height; fair to ruddy and freckled complexion; brown hair; hazel eyes
Identifying marks: 11, two stars, heart, ERW, M’c, anchor on upper arm; small lump and scar on right wrist; scar back of little finger on left hand.
(from the Indent to Convicts, 1835, NSW State Archives)

In the 1837 Muster, Jane Jones is recorded as working for master John Brown at Bathurst. Banns for the marriage of Jane Jones (“Mary”, 1835, 14 years, bond, present service Mr Parker, Bathurst), and Isaac Peach, 28 widower, free, were posted previous to July 1838. Disallowed. Authorities were not apparently satisfied that Mr Peach was in fact a widower, because he had stated on arrival that he was married with one child. Jane presumably declared her status as a spinster despite her previous marriage and whether or not William was still living! Jane lost no time in finding a replacement prospect as a husband. Women were scarce in those days, and there were always plenty of men wanting to marry the eligible females.

In November 1846 the Government Gazette (p1516) listed an unclaimed letter for Jane Coppock at the Sydney general post office. Jane did not mourn Joseph for long after he died in January 1866. She married on 23 July 1866 to David White; on the marriage certificate she is recorded as being a widow, age 53, of Long Swamp, parents John Randall (gardener) and Elizabeth Owen. David White (labourer of Long Swamp) is recorded as being a widower, born Scotland, parents David and Clementine White. Witnesses were Samuel Walsh and Mary Ann Hunt, her daughter. Jane and David continued to live at Flyer’s creek until her death on 17 October 1879 at Long Swamp, Orange, where she may have been at the home of Mary Ann. Jane died of dropsy (congestive heart failure) having been ill for seven months. She was 66 years old. The Walsh brothers, her son-in-law James and his brother Samuel were witnesses at the burial in Orange Cemetery (grave D022). William Scarr was the informant. He was a friend who later married Mary Jane Hunt, Jane’s grand daughter (the daughter of Mary Ann and Joshua Hunt). Joseph Henry COPPOCK and Jane RANDALL had the following children:
24 i. Margaret COPPOCK was born on 2 Jun 1850 in Cadia New South Wales Australia.72

+25 ii. Elizabeth (Betsy) COPPOCK.

+26 iii. Mary Ann COPPOCK.

+27 iv. Eliza COPPOCK.

+28 v. John COPPOCK.

+29 vi. Jane COPPOCK.

+30 vii. Margaret COPPOCK.

+31 viii. Joseph COPPOCK.

32 ix. Joanna COPPOCK was born on 4 Mar 1853.72,77

+33 x. William Henry COPPOCK.

+34 xi. George COPPOCK.

Lyn Hudson-Williamson on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of John Lodge:

Ticket of Leave January 10, 1842
Certificate of Freedom February 13, 1846

Doug Moncur on 23rd February, 2020 wrote of John Mancor:

Trial is reported in the Scotsman of 25 December 1824.
The same person is reported as absconding from No 11 road gang in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser of 3 December 1828

(see https://moncurdg.com/2020/02/23/another-moncur-bad-boy/ for full details)

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