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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

You can help grow this resource by contributing your own findings on any convict page by pressing the Contribute to this record button.

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If you have found a convict record that is not listed on this website (there is approximately 28,507 of them after all!), you can add a new convict here.

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Recent Submissions

Nell Murphy on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Hannah Dwyer:

Hannah DWYER was convicted at County Clare, Ireland on 30 June 1848 for stealing tobacco.  Previous offences.  7 yr transportation sentence.  Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Lord Auckand’ arriving 20 Jan 1849.

Single woman; 1 child (stated Thomas LIDDY was the father) not recorded as accompanying her mother onboard ship; aged 28 yrs; house servant; 4’1” height; fresh complexion, freckled; dk brown hair; Hazel eyes; Roman Catholic.
Native place of birth: County Clare, Ireand. (ref. as recorded on Convict Conduct record)
Brother: Michael (ref. Convict Indent record)
Sisters: Margaret, Mary, Peggy & Nancy (ref. as above).

Colony of VDL:
work wervices
20 Dec 1849: Mason - absent. 3 mths hard labour. Female Factory, Hobart.
28 Oct 1850: Ticket of Leave granted.
18 Oct 1853: Conditional Pardon approved.

APPLICATION FOR PERMISSION TO MARRY:
16 July 1850 - Hannah DWYER (per ‘Lord Auckland’) to John BROWN (free status). Approved.

MARRIAGE:
9 Aug 1850 - Hannah DWYER, aged 31 yrs, servant to John BROWN, Ship Wright, aged 35 yrs, at St. Joseph’s Church, Hobart.
(refs. noted on Conduct Record & TA 37/1/9 no. 516)

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Ann Parsons:

PARSONS, Ann (c1774-1831)
Tried - 16 March 1812 Devon Lent Assize
Ann was born somewhere between 1774 and 1786 (the records vary) and was committed for trial at the Lent Assize at Devon in 1812. She was a servant and was given a sentence of 7 years transportation for larceny and banished to New South Wales. Parsons was first sent to the Colony in 1812 on the Emu and finally reached Sydney in 1814 on the ship Broxbornebury.

BC: 1774 (Indent) or 1786 (1828 Census) or 1781 (death)
Sentenced: 16/03/1812 at Devon Lent Assize to transportation for 7 years
Crime: Larceny (Source: England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892, Class: HO 27; Piece: 8; Page: 52)
ALSO ON SHIP EMU IN 1812
Previous Occupation: Servant
Age on Convict Indent: 40
Certificate of Freedom 4103 (indent)
1814 Muster:
Ann PARSONS, con, Broxbornebury, off stores, single, Parramatta (3393)
1822 Muster:
No record found
1823-1825 Muster:
Ann PARSONS, FS, Broxbornebury 1814, 7 years, employed by Mr Balcombe, Sydney (35873)
1825, 29 July –
Ann Parsons per Broxbornebury. received a replacement COF # 145/4103 on 29/07/1825. Ann was described as a servant, native of Devonshire, aged 42, 5’1” tall, florid complexion, brown hair & hazel eyes. (Source: SRNSW Convict Certificates of Freedom, 4/4424, Reel 602)
1827, May –
“Police Report. SYDNEY. Ann Parsons, a lady who had been in the stocks for 4 hours, on Saturday last, for drunkenness, was apprehended the same evening, between 9 and 10 o’clock, when she was, as the constable said, “speechless drunk, bawling out murder! Sentenced 6 hours in the stocks.” (Source: Sydney Gazette, 30/05/1827, p3)
1828 Census:
Ann PARSONS, aged 42, FS, Broxbornebury, prot, laundress at C Dowlings in Cumberland St, Sydney (P0241) [Note: Her employer was Christopher Dowling, a stonemason who had arr free per ship Jupiter in 1823, living in Cumberland St. with his wife Martha (ex-convict midwife) & 3 children.]
1829, 13 March –
Ann Parsons, free, was recorded as being admitted to Sydney Gaol in March 1829, a “drunken common prostitute 3rd class 84 days Parramatta” (Source: SRNSW Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930; Series: 2514; Item: 4/6431; Roll: 851.) [Note:
Third class women were restricted to menial tasks and hard labour such as stone breaking and oakum picking. Source: http://www.parragirls.org.au/female-factory.php ]
1829, 19 Sept. –
Ann Parsons, free per ship Broxbornebury., was recorded as being admitted to Sydney Gaol in March 1831, accused of “notorious prostitute 3rd class 6 months” & sent to Parramatta [Female Factory] on 22 Sept. (Source: SRNSW Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818- 1930; Series: 2514; Item: 4/6431; Roll: 851.)
1831, 19 March –
Ann Parsons, free, was recorded as being admitted to Sydney Gaol in March 1831 for “stealing in a dwelling house” & sent to “Trial – Died in General Hospital 19th May.” (Source: SRNSW Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930; Series: 2514; Item: 4/6432; Roll: 851.) [Note: This date must be incorrect as burial record states funeral held in June]
NSW BDM:
Ann Parsons, aged 50, died at the Sydney Hospital in 1831. The service was held at St James on 23 June 1831 by Rev Hill. (V1831-9634-2C or 1569-15 & also listed under Convict Death Index 1828-1879, Indexed by Lesley Uebel, CD-Rom)

From the book “Journey to a New Life…” the story of the ships Emu & Broxbornebury by Elizabeth Hook (3rd ed. 2014). I am the author & can be contacted on hookey5609@yahoo.com.au for further info

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Ann Parsons:

PARSONS, Ann (c1774-1831)
Tried - 16 March 1812 Devon Lent Assize
Ann was born somewhere between 1774 and 1786 (the records vary) and was committed for trial at the Lent Assize at Devon in 1812. She was a servant and was given a sentence of 7 years transportation for larceny (Source: England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892, Class: HO 27; Piece: 8; Page: 52) and banished to New South Wales. Parsons was first sent to the Colony in 1812 on the Emu and finally reached Sydney in 1814 on the ship Broxbornebury.

For info re her colonial life, see the second entry for Ann Parsons on this site listed as a convict on the Broxbornebury

On the 12th of November 1812, the ship Emu left England in company with the brig James Hay, bound for the Colony of New South Wales. Lieutenant Alexander Bisset of the Royal Navy was the Commander of the Emu and he had a crew of twenty-two men although the Declaration given to Bisset stated there were thirty-six crew. They carried stores of food to last three months.

The ship was a small brig of 182 tons, with two decks and two masts, especially built for service in New South Wales and was armed with ten guns mounted and fitted with a devise to prevent attacks over the side. As well as some stores and a large quantity of ammunition for the Colony, on board were forty women convicts, several with children, having been put under sentence of transportation to Sydney, Port Jackson in the Colony of New South Wales, over 20 thousand kilometres away.

At this time Britain was still fighting a war with France (mainly at sea against Napoleon) however in 1812 a second Colonial war with America began, called the War of 1812. The American’s grievance was the British insistence upon the right of search of their vessels at sea and the trade blockades which were in place. The Americans started with inflicting heavy losses on English ships using privateers (American government-sanctioned pirates) and their “prizes” were often sailed into American waters and sold. The Americans also invaded Canada, which was under British rule, and set fire to the city of Toronto. The English retaliated with setting fire in Washington to the presidential mansion (the White House).

On leaving England, Captain Bisset was handed a Declaration granting him Letters of Marque and Reprizals “for the apprehending, seizing, and taking the ships, vessels and goods belonging to the United States of America”.

The war was soon over, but unfortunately the Emu found herself directly in the firing line. In the Bay of Biscay they had parted company with the James Hay and on the 30th of November they were alone when the Holkar, an American privateer approached. Captain Jonathan Rowland was the commanding officer of the larger vessel which was mounted with eighteen guns and a crew of one hundred and fifty. The Emu was vastly outnumbered and most of the crew refused to fight, except for Captain Bisset, a gunner and a landsman. With little choice against such odds, Bisset capitulated, first throwing overboard the ship’s papers and other official documents and the Emu was boarded by the Americans.

Nearly seven weeks after their capture, on the 17th of January 1813, the crew of the Emu and the forty women convicts were landed at Mindelo on Saint Vincent one of the Cape Verde Islands “with provisions enough for four months”.

The Holkar sailed away with the Emu to Providence Harbour, Rhode Island where the ship was sold as a “prize” and the Captain and crew receiving most, if not all, of the money received.

The Cape Verde Islands are located in the Atlantic Ocean, six hundred and twenty kms. off the Coast of Senegal, Africa, then under the control of the Portuguese. There seems to be no official record of what happened to the women convicts, their children and the crew during their stay there, but an unverified report states that they were looked after by Catholic nuns. One of the women, Elizabeth King, died on the island on the 29th of January 1813.

It must have taken a few months for the news of the ship’s capture to be known by the authorities in England and they finally sent the ship Isabella to the Cape Verde Islands for their “rescue”. They arrived back at Portsmouth England (via a journey to Bear Haven, Ireland), about the 12th of October 1813, only for the authorities to be told the women were “….in a state of nakedness and inadvisable of their being landed…” They were kept on board in the harbour for a total of four months until another ship was made ready for a voyage to the Colony, which was the Broxbornebury in February 1814, along with an extra eighty-five female convicts.

Not all the thirty-nine remaining women from the Emu made the journey to New South Wales. Five convicts were transferred to the Captivity prison hulk ship in Portsmouth Harbour. Four of these women were granted Full Pardons and one died on the hulk ship. For the other thirty-four it had been a long voyage when they finally arrived in Sydney in July 1814, twenty months after first embarking on the Emu!

From the book “Journey to a New Life…” the story of the ships Emu & Broxbornebury by Elizabeth Hook (3rd ed. 2014). I am the author & can be contacted on hookey5609@yahoo.com.au for further info

Sources:
Public Record Office (UK), Reel 32; CO 201 (Colonial Office); Original Correspondence; Vol. 70, pp72-3
Admiralty records at National Archives (UK) ADM 7/319 & ADM 108/24 p15)

Nell Murphy on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Hannah Dwyer:

Hannah DWYER was convicted at County Cork, Ireland on July 1840 for Larceny - stealing a cloak. Previous offences. 7 yr transportation sentence. Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘Mary Anne’ arriving 30 March 1841.

Single woman.

Colony of VDL:
Work services.

Free Certificate issued 30 Jan 1850.

N.B. There is another person, convicted, also named “Hannah Dwyer”.

Nell Murphy on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Catherine Fitzgibbon:

Catherine FITZGIBBON was convicted at County Cork, Ireland on 10 Oct 1842 for stealing clothes. Gaol Report: “Good. Once convicted before”.  7 yr transportation sentence.  Sent to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) per the ‘East London’ arriving 21 Sept 1843.

Single woman; Roman Catholic religion.

Colony of VDL:
Work services.
1843: Living at Brickfield’s Depot.
10 June 1844: McCarthy’s - misconduct. 3 mths hard labour at the Female House of Correction.
1846: Abscond. 3 months extension of sentence.
13 June 1846: Delivered of a male child, John. (ref. note on Conduct Record)
30 Apri 1848: Application for Permission to Marry - Catherine FITZGIBBON (per ‘East London’) to John COOPER (free status). Approved.
29 May 1848: Marriage.  Catherine FITZGIBBON, aged 28 yrs, house servant, Pass holder to John COOPER, carpenter, aged 29 yrs. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Launceston.  (ref. TA 37/1/7 no. 2063).
18 Jan 1850: Free Certificate issued.

CHILD:
Joseph COOPER born 19 Aug 1855 at Fingal, VDL. Father - John Cooper, carpenter, residence - Cullenswood.  Mother - Catherine Fitzgibbon. (ref. TA 33/1/33 no. 294)

Leslie Thompson on 8th September, 2019 wrote of George Whitaker:

Burial Braidwood General Cemetery:
GEORGE WHITAKER 1860 56 yrs   Reidsdale             unmarked   registration Braidwood

Burial Register Seymour Pioneer Cemetery:
GEORGE W WHITTAKER 29 Dec 1873 69 last residence Warough

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Sophia Kingsmore:

On the 12th of November 1812, the ship Emu left England in company with the brig James Hay, bound for the Colony of New South Wales. Lieutenant Alexander Bisset of the Royal Navy was the Commander of the Emu and he had a crew of twenty-two men although the Declaration given to Bisset stated there were thirty-six crew. They carried stores of food to last three months.

The ship was a small brig of 182 tons, with two decks and two masts, especially built for service in New South Wales and was armed with ten guns mounted and fitted with a devise to prevent attacks over the side. As well as some stores and a large quantity of ammunition for the Colony, on board were forty women convicts, several with children, having been put under sentence of transportation to Sydney, Port Jackson in the Colony of New South Wales, over 20 thousand kilometres away.

At this time Britain was still fighting a war with France (mainly at sea against Napoleon) however in 1812 a second Colonial war with America began, called the War of 1812. The American’s grievance was the British insistence upon the right of search of their vessels at sea and the trade blockades which were in place. The Americans started with inflicting heavy losses on English ships using privateers (American government-sanctioned pirates) and their “prizes” were often sailed into American waters and sold. The Americans also invaded Canada, which was under British rule, and set fire to the city of Toronto. The English retaliated with setting fire in Washington to the presidential mansion (the White House).

On leaving England, Captain Bisset was handed a Declaration granting him Letters of Marque and Reprizals “for the apprehending, seizing, and taking the ships, vessels and goods belonging to the United States of America”.

The war was soon over, but unfortunately the Emu found herself directly in the firing line. In the Bay of Biscay they had parted company with the James Hay and on the 30th of November they were alone when the Holkar, an American privateer approached. Captain Jonathan Rowland was the commanding officer of the larger vessel which was mounted with eighteen guns and a crew of one hundred and fifty. The Emu was vastly outnumbered and most of the crew refused to fight, except for Captain Bisset, a gunner and a landsman. With little choice against such odds, Bisset capitulated, first throwing overboard the ship’s papers and other official documents and the Emu was boarded by the Americans.

Nearly seven weeks after their capture, on the 17th of January 1813, the crew of the Emu and the forty women convicts were landed at Mindelo on Saint Vincent one of the Cape Verde Islands “with provisions enough for four months”.

The Holkar sailed away with the Emu to Providence Harbour, Rhode Island where the ship was sold as a “prize” and the Captain and crew receiving most, if not all, of the money received.

The Cape Verde Islands are located in the Atlantic Ocean, six hundred and twenty kms. off the Coast of Senegal, Africa, then under the control of the Portuguese. There seems to be no official record of what happened to the women convicts, their children and the crew during their stay there, but an unverified report states that they were looked after by Catholic nuns. One of the women, Elizabeth King, died on the island on the 29th of January 1813.

It must have taken a few months for the news of the ship’s capture to be known by the authorities in England and they finally sent the ship Isabella to the Cape Verde Islands for their “rescue”. They arrived back at Portsmouth England (via a journey to Bear Haven, Ireland), about the 12th of October 1813, only for the authorities to be told the women were “….in a state of nakedness and inadvisable of their being landed…” They were kept on board in the harbour for a total of four months until another ship was made ready for a voyage to the Colony, which was the Broxbornebury in February 1814, along with an extra eighty-five female convicts.

Not all the thirty-nine remaining women from the Emu made the journey to New South Wales. Five convicts were transferred to the Captivity prison hulk ship in Portsmouth Harbour. Four of these women were granted Full Pardons and one died on the hulk ship. For the other thirty-four it had been a long voyage when they finally arrived in Sydney in July 1814, twenty months after first embarking on the Emu!

Sources:
Public Record Office (UK), Reel 32; CO 201 (Colonial Office); Original Correspondence; Vol. 70, pp72-3
Admiralty records at National Archives (UK) ADM 7/319 & ADM 108/24 p15)

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of John King:

John King (c1778-?)
John King reached Sydney on 28 July 1814 on the ship Surrey (1). He had been tried in London GD [see trial record below] on 8 April 1812 & was given a 7 year term. He was described as a native of Essex, a seaman, aged 36, 5’4¼” tall, sallow complexion, brown hair & light brown eyes. Also - John King, Age: 36, Born: Essex [ESS ENG], Seaman, Height: 5/4 1/4, Complexion: Sallow, Hair: Brown, Eyes: Light Brown, Convicted: Gaol Delivery 08 Apr 1812 London [MDX ENG] 7 years; Transported per Surrey, Departed England [ENG], arrived 28 Jul 1814 Sydney; Certificate of Freedom 2221. Source: Convict Indents &c; SRNSW ref: Vol. 4/4004 Surrey 1814 Entry No. 66
1812 - JOHN KING, Theft > grand larceny, 8th April 1812.
333. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April, three bottles of castor oil, value 20 s. the property of John Kirk, Richard Herrin, Henry Herrin, and Brailsford Bright.
THOMAS DENSON. I am warehouseman to John Kirk, Richard Herrin, Henry Herrin, and Brailsford Bright, they are chemists and druggist, Bishop’sgate within. The prisoner was a porter employed by them, I believe he received eighteen shillings a week. On Saturday April the 4th, I mentioned my suspicion to the partners, I had an opportunity on Saturday night of detecting the prisoner. Before I went into the cellar the prisoner was in the cellar, I called the prisoner up, and sent him with a bag which was standing about the cellar into another part of the warehouse, with a view of going down into the cellar myself. I went into the cellar and concealed myself behind a cask, and presently the prisoner came into the cellar and took two or three bottles off a shelf in the cellar, I supposed them to be castor oil, it was from a place where there ought to be nothing but castor oil. When he had taken them from a shelf he wrapped them up in paper and then put them into his breeches, he left a lamp standing upon a cask, and came up stairs in the dark, and I remained on the premises until eight o’clock. When the prisoner had gone about twenty yards from the door an officer secured him, which we had procured for the purpose, he was taken to the watchhouse.
SAMUEL SHEPPARD. I am a constable I was stationed opposite to Mr. Kirk’s house, a wholesale druggist, in Bishopgate-street; from the information I received I watched the prisoner, I saw him about ten yards from Mr. Kirk’s house.
Q. Did you know him before - A. No. I did not. I observed that he walked very wide and stradling; I walked close behind him for about ten yards further, then I laid hold of him and asked him what he had got about him, he said nothing, what did I want with him; I told him I was an officer, and insisted upon searching him; I put my hand between his legs, then he began to make some resistance; I told him I would knock him down if he took any thing out of his pocket; he was putting his hand into his breeches; I then took from his breeches three bottles, I asked him what it was; he said, oil; I asked him if he was not a porter in some house; he said, no, he was a jobbing porter in the street. I secured him and took him into the watchhouse; I further searched him, and only found his wages which he had received. I took him to the Compter, I there asked him where he lived, he said in Old-street-road; I then went to his lodgings in Draper’s-buildings, No. 21, Old-street-road; I there saw his wife, I asked her leave to search the place; I found this quantity of soap of different descriptions, and a piece of rhubarb, and this roll of oil-skin. These are the three bottles that I took from his person, I have had them ever since.
Q. What soap is it - A. Castile soap.
RICHARD HERRIN. Q. Have you looked at these bottles - A. I have. They are castor oil.
Q. Do you keep your castor oil in the cellar which we have been speaking of - A. Yes, of that description, we keep in that cellar, I have no doubt it is our property. The soap I can say is Castile soap of a similar description to ours we use it. The rhubard we sell and the oil skin we sell.
The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.
GUILTY, aged 34.
Transported for Seven Years
London jury, before Mr. Recorder.
(Source: Old Bailey on-line http://www.oldbaileyonline.org )
1814 Muster:
Sophia KINGSMORE, con, Brox, off stores, wife to John King, Windsor (1859) & spouse - John KING, con, Surrey, off stores, to Joseph Mercer, Windsor (0917)
1814 –
John King was sent to Windsor for distribution from the ship Surrey. (Source: SRNSW Col Sec Papers)
1822 Muster:
No record found for John King.
1823 to 1825 Muster:
No record found for John King.
1828 Census:
John KING, 37, Surrey 1813 (?), prot, tailor, at Thomas Kains, Clarence St, Sydney (K0819) [Note: There was a total of 10 people living at this address including Mrs Dorothy Wood, Age: 60, Protestant, Arrived per Broxbornebury 1813 (?), Came Free; Servant to Thos Kain; Householder; Residence: Clarence St [NSW AUS]; Household Return district: Sydney]

Date and place of death for John King not found.

From the book “Journey to a New Life…” the story of the ships Emu & Broxbornebury by Elizabeth Hook (3rd ed. 2014). I am the author & can be contacted on hookey5609@yahoo.com.au for further info

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Sophia Kingsmore:

KINGSMORE, Sophia (c1793-1815)
Tried - 23 March 1812 Sussex Lent Assize
Sophia was sent before the Sussex Court charged with burglary. She was found guilty, sentenced to death but she was later reprieved and had her term commuted to transportation for life to New South Wales. Sophia was aged about 19 and originally sailed to the Colony in 1812 on the Emu and finally reached Sydney in 1814 on the Broxbornebury.

BC: 1790 [Brox. Indent] or 1793 [Emu] or 1793 [Death]
Sentenced: 23/03/1812 Sussex Lent Assize to death, commuted to transportation for life
Crime: Burglary
Previous Occupation: Servant
Age on Convict Indent (Broxbornebury ) 24
ALSO ON SHIP EMU IN 1812
1814 Muster:
Sophia KINGSMORE, con, Brox, off stores, wife to John King, Windsor (1859) & spouse - John KING, con, Surrey, off stores, to Joseph Mercer, Windsor (0917)
1814 –
John King was sent to Windsor for distribution from the ship Surrey. (Source: SRNSW Col Sec Papers)
1822 Muster:
No record found for John King.
1823 to 1825 Muster:
No record found for John King.
1828 Census:
John KING, 37, Surrey 1813 (?), prot, tailor, at Thomas Kains, Clarence St, Sydney (K0819) [Note: There was a total of 10 people living at this address including Mrs Dorothy Wood, Age: 60, Protestant, Arrived per Broxbornebury 1813 (?), Came Free; Servant to Thos Kain; Householder; Residence: Clarence St [NSW AUS]; Household Return district: Sydney]
NSW BDM:
Sophia King (?), aged 24, of Windsor, died in 1815 & the service was held on 30 April at St Mathews Windsor. (Sophia King, Convict; Died 29 Apr 1815 Windsor district, Aged: 24; Buried 30 Apr 1815 Windsor by [Reverend] Robt Cartwright; Registered at St Matthews Church of England Windsor, Arrived per Broxbornebury 1814. Source: V1815-3386-2B & St Matthew’s Church of England Windsor NSW: Church Register - Burials; ML ref: Reel SAG 53, published in St Matthews Church of England Windsor NSW: Parish Registers 1810 to 1856 ‘A Complete Transcription’, by Lake Macquarie Family History Group Inc, 2003; Vol Entry# 141)

From the book “Journey to a New Life…” the story of the ships Emu & Broxbornebury by Elizabeth Hook (3rd ed. 2014). I am the author & can be contacted on hookey5609@yahoo.com.au for further info

Beth Kebblewhite on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Sophia Kingsmore:

KINGSMORE, Sophia (c1793-1815)
Tried - 23 March 1812 Sussex Lent Assize
Sophia was sent before the Sussex Court charged with burglary. She was found guilty, sentenced to death but she was later reprieved and had her term commuted to transportation for life to New South Wales. Sophia was aged about 19 and originally sailed to the Colony in 1812 on the Emu and finally reached Sydney in 1814 on the Broxbornebury.

For info re her colonial life, see the second entry for Sophia Kingsmore on this site listed as a convict on the Broxbornebury

Iris Dunne on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Hannah Knight:

Conviction 10 January 1809

Criminal Register charged with Larceny (stealing wearing apparel)

Paula Griffiths on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Hannah Knight:

Can I get a source for the date of birth? What document was it on. thank you.

Eileen Wray on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Joseph Marsh:

Joseph was a cloth dresser convicted of highway robbery with his brother Christopher. They lived in Long Marston near York. This from Long Marston Church records.

D Wong on 8th September, 2019 wrote of Ferdinando Shakespeare:

15/3/1838 Berrows Worcester Journal:
Ferdinado (sic) Shakespeare, aged 23, and Joseph Bloomer, aged 22, both nailors; indicted for breaking into the shop of William Cox, at Cradley, in the Parish of Halesowen and stealing an amount of bacon, cheese and other articles. Sentenced to 10 years transportation each.

Ferdinando Shakespeare was listed as 21 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Worcestershire.

Ferdinando could read, was protestant, single, 5’2½’ tall, ruddy complexion, brown hair, grey eyes, eyebrows partially meeting, diagonal scar on centre of forehead, scar over right eyebrow, and two over left, small scar outside left elbow.

15/3/1844: TOL Port Phillip. (listed as Ferdinand).

1889: Ferdinando Shakespeare died at Heathcote in Victoria - listed as 88 years old.

No marriage found.

D Wong on 8th September, 2019 wrote of John Steedworthy:

Salisbury and Winchester Journal Wiltshire, England
10 Mar 1817

SALISBURY
John Steedworthy, Edmund flutton, John Howell, John Martin, James Hum, Noah Thomas and Geo. Thomas and John Webb, for Burglary.

Listed as 26 years old on arrival on Ancestry Convict Indents.

11/3/1824: COF

D Wong on 7th September, 2019 wrote of Samuel Denford:

23/8/1834 Gloucestershire Chronicle Gloucestershire, England:
BRISTOL.___APPREHENSION OF BURGLARS.
On Wednesday, a gang of desperate burglars, consisting of four men, named Wm. Bishop, Edward Fuller, William Smith, and Samuel Goddard, and three women, were apprehended at their haunts in Lewin’s Mead, on a charge of having on the previous night broken into the house of Mr. Holden, in Somerset-street, Kingsdown, and robbed it of several valuable articles of plate and wearing apparel.  The stolen property was found in their possession ; skeleton keys and other housebreaking apparatus were also discovered.  The male prisoners were fully committed for felony ; and the women are remanded for further examination.

William Bishop, and Edward Fuller were also on board - no ship found yet for William Smith.

Samuel Denford was listed as 27 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Bristol.

Samuel was literate, protestant, single, 5’3¼” tall, sallow complexion, light brown hair brown eyes, scar on left eyebrow, sun, moon, seven stars, cross, WWHDSD, inside right arm, small scar left side upper lip, MG, Mermaid, Anchor, Heart, Square, and compasses, inside lower left arm, two scars left thumb.___Served six years at Woolwich.

1837: Assigned to Goat Island

1841: TOL, Musswellbrook.
31/12/1847: CP
18/1/1849: COF

1842: Application to marry Ann Kennedy (John Renwick).

1842: Married Anne Kennard (28/4/1819-29/1/1850) at Maitland.
Children:
8/3/1845: Samuel
1847: Martha Jane
1849: William Henry
1851: George

29/1/1866: Samuel Denford died suddenly, aged 55, and was buried at the Camperdown Cemetery, Newtown, NSW.
Ann was also buried there.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of John Gwilliam:

John Gwilliam was sent to Moreton Bay.
Moreton Bay records:
Original conviction: Wilts Ass. 4 Mar 1820, sentence 14 years Trade: rougher and shears.
colonial sentence: Patters Plains Bench, 2 Nov 1826, for robbery and harbouring a bushranger, sentence 3 years.  To Sydney 17 Dec 1829.
Description: native of Gloucestershire, age 53, 5 ft 8, sallow comp, light brown hair, grey eyes.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of John Smith:

John Smith was sent to Moreton Bay.
Moreton Bay records:
John Smith, convicted at Wilts Ass, 24 July 1819 and sentenced to Life. Trade: shoemaker. Colonial sentence: General Sessions Sydney, 11 March 1829, for stealing Government leather, sentenced to 3 years. Sent to Sydney 1 Sept 1832.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of John Steedworthy:

Moreton Bay- Description:
John Steedworthy, native of Fermanagh, age 24, 5 ft 4 1/2. fair comp, brown hair, grey eyes. religion - r.c.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of Charles Janes:

Charles was sent to Moreton Bay.
Moreton Bay records:
Original conviction: Wilts Qr Session, 6 jan 1826, convicted for stealing butter, sentence 7 years. Trade- groom. Colonial sentence: General sessions , Penrith, 19 July 1828 , for being a runaway and incorrigible character, sentence 3 years. To Sydney, 4 Feb 1832.
Description: native of Wiltshire, aged 19, 5 ft 3 1/2, fair freckled comp., red hair, grey eyes. Religion E.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of George Bull:

George Bull was sent to Moreton Bay.
Original conviction: Wilts Qr Sesions,11 July 1825, 7 years. Labourer. Colonial Sentence, Wallis Plains, General Sessions, 24 April 1828, for Hut breaking and robbery,  sentence 3 years. To Sydney, 8 July 1831.
Description:Native of Devizes, age 21, sallow comp, brown hair, hazle eyes. 5 ft 7 1/2.

Maureen Withey on 7th September, 2019 wrote of James Say:

James Say was sent to Moreton Bay.
Moreton Bay Records:
James Say, original conviction, Wilts Ass, 7 Aug 1824, sentenced to Life. Trade - weaver. Colonial conviction,General Sessions, Sydney, sentence 3 years, 30 Sept 1826, for assault with intent to rob. Sent to Sydney, 27 Oct 1829.
Description:native of Wiltshire, age 16, height 5 ft 1 3/4. fair comp. light brown hair, grey eyes, religion E.

D Wong on 7th September, 2019 wrote of Catherine Quin:

45 convicts were landed in VDL and 62 in NSW.
Catherine Quin was listed on the Founders and Survivors website but there was no convict record of her on the Tasmanian lists.
She was listed on the NSW Gov. Convict Records website and also on Ancestry Convict Indents for convicts to NSW.

Catherine Quin was listed as 42 years old on arrival in VDL.
(English newspaper also states that she was 42.

Native Place: County Down, Ire.

No actual crime found but possibly transported for Uttering.

Catherine was 5’0¼” tall, pale complexion, dark eyes, black hair.

1823: NSW BDM - Married William Jackson at St. Matthew’s, Windsor.  No Children listed.

23/5/1835: COF - Wife of William Jackson (as stated on her CF).

There is a death listed for Catherine Jackson, aged 74, in 1853.

Iris Dunne on 7th September, 2019 wrote of Catherine Quin:

Ticket of Leave No.30/811 dated 25 November 1830 in the District of Parramatta, Tried 24 March 1821

Indents: aged 22, Trade Housekeeper

Iris Dunne on 7th September, 2019 wrote of Catherine Wilson:

Indents: aged 30, conviction 30 July 1821, Native Place Dublin, Trade Servant

Possible aliases Smith, Whelan

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