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ConvictRecords.com.au is based on the British Convict transportation register, compiled by the State Library of Queensland. We have given a searchable interface to this database, and show the information for each convict in full.

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Recent Submissions

David Bromwich on 8th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Plant:

Record https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON27-1-9$init=CON27-1-9P171. Aged 23 -> DOB ABt 1818
Ricard Plant boatman, highway robbery, aged 23. 15 years seems an appropriate or even lenient sentence for highway robbery,

Ancestry:
Name: Richard Plant
Birth Year: abt 1817
Age: 33
Death Date: 10 Aug 1850
Death Place: Tasmania
Registration Year: 1850
Registration Place: Launceston, Tasmania
Registration Number: 252
(Record fits birth year. All other TROVE newspaper reports of deaths of a Richard Plant point to another person. My research into Richard Plant shoemaker from Stone, Staffordshire indicate a similar death date - wife a widow in 1851 Census, but the difference in vocation make that link less likely - the whole extended family were shoemakers or in that industry)

Also. Ticket of Leave
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article226534633
Convict 4143
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8762848
Ticket of Leave Granted 9 May 1848

Robin Sharkey on 8th April, 2019 wrote of Sarah Tillett:

Sarah Tillett was transported for seven years after being tried in early October 1809 at the Essex Quarter Sessions at Colchester. She arrived in NSW on the “Canada” in 1810. Her age was not recorded on the ship’s indent.

In the 1814 NSW Census she was recorded as living with Henry Austin in Sydney, being off the stores and mustered in Sydney. Henry Austin was Irish and had arrived in 1806 on the Tellicherry, aged only 16 or 17.  In the 1814 Muster, Mary Austin, a convict arrived in 1813, also resided with Henry Austin, as a servant. It’s likely that Sarah Tillett was in a relationship with Henry Austin since she was recorded as “lives with” him. Henry would then have been aged about 25. Presumably Sarah was his age or younger.

RETURN to EGLAND

In 1817, Sarah grabbed an opportunity to return to England on a free passage on the brig ‘Kangaroo”. She had been freed herself for a year.

The government brig “Kangaroo” was being sent by Governor Macquarie back to England, he believing the brig inadequate for its purpose and that its commander, Captain, Charles Jeffreys, was incompetent and lazy. Macquarie wrote in his diary on 29 January 1817:
“I have ordered Lt. Jeffreys not to engage to take any Passengers Home but such as may have my permission, it being my intention, in pursuance of Orders received from the Secry. of State – to send Home in the Kangaroo as many Persons as she can conveniently accommodate who have lately become free by their Sentences of Transportation having expired.”

In the Sydney Gazette of 1st and 8th February 1817, the Governor’s secretary advertised that the ‘Kangaroo’ was being sent back to England with Despatches, and “that Passages will be provided for fifteen Women of the above Description [i.e. former convicts who have obtained their freedom by Servitude]; but none need apply who shall not produce written Testimonials of their decent and orderly Conduct in this Country, subscribed by the Clergyman and Magistrate of the District wherein they reside ...” Applications were to be received by the 15th February.

As it turned out, only eight women were sent, not fifteen. Acceptance of Sarah’s application as one of the few lucky women indicates that she was of reputable behaviour and was known to her local clergyman (despite having lived with Henry Austin).

On 5th April, the Sydney Gazette recorded:
“The persons to whom a passage to the mother country has been humanely granted by Government, embarked yesterday morning on board His Majesty’s brig Kangaroo; as did also this forenoon a small party of the 46th Regiment, who had obtained leave to return to Europe.”

A Judge Advocate’s list of 5th April included Sarah Tillett, certifying that there are no detainers lodged against them, all about to leave in “Kangaroo”.

Finally, her name appeared as one of 8 women listed as having obtained Certificates of clearance to leave the colony.

She sailed on ‘Kangaroo” on 9 April 1817.
Henry Austin, aged 28,  married in Sydney to someone else a few months later in September 1817.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Agnes Lock:

The alleged debt against Agnes must have been disproved because she was included on the list provided by the Judge Advocate’s office of the persons, all to sail on ‘Kangaroo’, who had been give a Certificate of clearance by the Judge Advocate.

Agnes had come to get this free passage to England because Governor Macquarie was sending ‘Kangaroo’ and her commander, Charles Jeffreys, back to London, being unsatisfied with both, and recorded in his diary that “I have ordered Lt. Jeffreys not to engage to take any Passengers Home but such as may have my permission, it being my intention, in pursuance of Orders received from the Secry. of State – to send Home in the Kangaroo as many Persons as she can conveniently accommodate who have lately become free by their Sentences of Transportation having expired.”

Agnes would have applied as an ex-convict woman, following an advertisement for applications appearing in Sydney Gazettes dated 1st and 8th February 1817.
Any applicant had to produce a written testimonial of her decent and orderly conduct signed by a clergyman and a magistrate. Agnes, to have been accepted, must have been known to such people, willing to support her in her application.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Hannah Jones:

In the general Muster of 1801, Hannah is recorded as living with George Humphries. George had come on ‘William & Eliza” in 1791. He had been tried at the Old Bailey, like Hannah, in 1787 in fact only in February, while Hannah was tried in April. It is likely they were in Newgate prison at the same time and knew each other, both being sentenced to transportation.

Hannah got a free passage back to England on “Kangaroo”.  The circumstances were these:
The government brig “Kangaroo” was being sent by Governor Macquarie back to England, he believing the brig inadequate for its purpose and that its commander, Captain, Charles Jeffreys, was incompetent and lazy. Macquarie wrote in his diary on 29 January 1817:
“I have ordered Lt. Jeffreys not to engage to take any Passengers Home but such as may have my permission, it being my intention, in pursuance of Orders received from the Secry. of State – to send Home in the Kangaroo as many Persons as she can conveniently accommodate who have lately become free by their Sentences of Transportation having expired.”

In the Sydney Gazette of 1st and 8th February 1817, the Governor’s secretary advertised that the ‘Kangaroo’ was being sent back to England with Despatches, and “that Passages will be provided for fifteen Women of the above Description [i.e. former convicts who have obtained their freedom by Servitude]; but none need apply who shall not produce written Testimonials of their decent and orderly Conduct in this Country, subscribed by the Clergyman and Magistrate of the District wherein they reside ...” Applications were to be received by the 15th February.

Hannah must have therefore seized this opportunity. It was a brave move since it had been 30 years since she was convicted in London, and she must have been aged about 52 / 53 years. However, her acceptance as one of the lucky women also indicates that she was of reputable behaviour and was known to her local clergyman.

On 29 March 1817, she advertised (Sydney Gazette) her intention to leave the colony and asked, in the usual way, that any claims be presented against her.

On 5th April, the Sydney Gazette recorded:
“The persons to whom a passage to the mother country has been humanely granted by Government, embarked yesterday morning on board His Majesty’s brig Kangaroo; as did also this forenoon a small party of the 46th Regiment, who had obtained leave to return to Europe.”

When ‘Kangaroo” sailed on 9th April 1817, Hannah was on board, one of nine other ex-convict women, and 8 ex-convict men, for London.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Hannah Jones:

Hannah Pleasant Jones was tried und er this exact name at the Old Bailey.
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t17870418-19

She had approached two young girls, sisters named Sarah and Charlotte Spencer, and saying it was cold, and and that their mother was her god mother (not true) she took them to a public house, gave them liquor so that the elder one was drunk and left her in a public housei Fetter Lane. Leaving the younger Charlotte in an ale-house, she emptied the girls’ baskets into one and left some of her own things with Charlotte wrapped in a bundle, then she took Sarah to Hatton Garden and back to Fetter Lane. Sarah seems to have got away from her.  The Spencer parents, and their son, went looking for the younger Sarah and eventually found her at 11pm that night in bed with Hannah Pleasant Jones in a lodging house. Hannah had pawned the dress and the earrings were found in her pocket.

The jury found Hannah guilty of stealing, but not guilty of the other charge of assault.
She was sentenced to Life and the court record noted “(Africa”).
As the First Fleet left England n 13 May 1787, Hannah’s trial on 18th April was possibly a bit late to get her on one of those vessels. However she was eventually put on to the notorious “Lady Juliana” which left Plymouth two years after Hanna’s trial, in July 1789. SHe arrived in Sydney on 3 June 1790.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of James Nangle:

At the Inquest into the death of Mary Murphy held on 29th May 1812 (death on 28th May) James Nangle gave evidence. He said he was a lodger in Mary Murphy’s house. At about 7 o’clock in the morning, hed seen her in a weak state and made an observation to a neighbour that he didn’t expect her to live the day out. James Nangle made his mark in adopting the written record of his evidence i.e. he could not write his name.

In October 1812, he made further attempts to return to Europe. He advertised in the Sydney Gazettes of 31 October 1812 (p.1), and 7 November 1812 (p.2) his intention to leave the colony in the ‘Isabella”. Again, he didn’t leave.. 4 December 1812 Isabella sailed (per SG 5/12/1812) with passengers Captain Durie of 73 regiment Lt Lundin, and Sir Henry Brown Hayes, pardoned as a life serving convict .”

1814 Muster, James Nangle, Free, per “Rolla” was mustered at Sydney and victualled off stores.

In 1817, Nangle had another opportunity to return to Europe.  The government’s brig “Kangaroo” was being sent by Governor Macquarie back to England, he believing the brig inadequate for its purpose and its commander, Captain, Charles Jeffreys, incompetent and lazy. Macquarie wrote in his diary on 29 January 1817
“I have ordered Lt. Jeffreys not to engage to take any Passengers Home but such as may have my permission, it being my intention, in pursuance of Orders received from the Secry. of State – to send Home in the Kangaroo as many Persons as she can conveniently accommodate who have lately become free by their Sentences of Transportation having expired.”

Here was Nangle’s opportunity for a free passage home, since Macquarie included him on a nominal return of persons (dated 29 March 1817) for whom passages were to be provided on “Kangaroo” for England. Although Nangle again advertised his intention to leave the colony (Sydney Gazettes of 22 February and the 1st March 1817), yet again, he did not leave.
In a letter of April 3 1817 from Governor Macquarie to Lt Jeffreys R.N., commander of the ‘Kangaroo” Macquarie wrote: “I have to inform you that James Nangle, free man, included in the List of Passengers going to England in the Kangaroo, has withdrawn his [indecipherable], not being able now to leave the Colony.”

Why James could not leave the Colony was not explained. Macquarie recorded in his journal on 9 April 1817 that the Kangaroo had departed that day and included with the passengers were “8 Free Men (formerly Convicts) and 10 Free Women formerly Convicts.”

In 1818, Nangle blotted his copybook by being found guilty at the Court of Criminal Jurisdiction on 4 December 1818, of stealing a blanket (SG 12 December 1818, p.3) and was sentenced to two years at Newcastle. He was listed on 31 December 1818 on list of prisoners on ship “Lady Nelson” for Newcastle. He would have spent all of 1819 and 1820 as a prisoner at Newcastle.

20 June 1822, Nangle was living in Kent Street, Sydney and was on list of persons set to receive an assigned convict — John Doyle per Lord Sidmouth. A notation states ‘returned by Gov’t”.
25 April 1823 – James Nangle of Kent Street, on list of persons receiving an assigned convict – who was, again, John Doyle per Lord Sidmouth. Doyle was from Wexford and had arrived in NSW in 1821. In Sept 1822 he’d been in a Parramatta road party before being assigned to Nangle in 1823.

In the September 1822 Muster James Nangle was listed as an “oilman” of Sydney. An oilman could have sold oil, particularly lamp oil. (For example, in 1823 one Alexander Payne was “an oilman about the streets of Sydney”.

Yet, by the time of the 1825 Muster he had at last achieved his desire of returning to England was listed in that year’s muster as “gone to England”

D Wong on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Old Bailey:
RICHARD MORTIMER, GEORGE MORTIMER.
Violent Theft: robbery.
12th May 1845
Verdict Guilty > pleaded guilty; Guilty > unknown
Sentence Transportation; Imprisonment

RICHARD MORTIMER and GEORGE MORTIMER were indicted for a robbery on George Wright, on the 7th of May, putting him in fear, and stealing from his person, and against his will, 1 pair of boots, value 12s., the goods of John Collins; and that Richard Mortimer bad been before convicted of felony; to which
RICHARD MORTIMER pleaded GUILTY . Aged 19.— Transported for Ten Years.

GEORGE WRIGHT. I live in Boulevard-court, Strand, and am in the employ of Mr. John Collins. On the 7th of May, about nine o’clock at night, I was near Hyde Park, in Knightsbridge. I had a pair of boots of my master’s—I was asking a respectable young woman my way to Chelsea—the prisoners came up to me, and said they would show me—they walked me about for two hours, till they got to the Willow-walk, and then George Mortimer held me while Richard took the boots from me, and ran away—I then asked George Mortimer to show me the way home, and we had only just turned out of the fields when we met a policeman, and I gave him in charge—I did not know either of the prisoners before—I am ten years old—these are the boots.

JOHN FRYER (police-constable P 31.) Wright gave me George Mortimer in charge—he said, George did not take die boots from him, but one that was with him did, and George said it was his brother—I took Wright with me, and went to a house—I found Richard Mortimer sitting on the bed in the back kitchen, and these boots were under the bed where he sat.

(George Mortimer received a good character.)

G. MORTIMER— GUILTY. Aged 18.— Confined Three Months.

Richard Mortimer was 19 years old on arrival.
Native Place, Norwich, Norfolk.

Richard was 5’4¼” tall, fresh complexion, dark brown hair, no whiskers, black eyes, literate, single, protestant, tattoos.

Father: George
Mother: Mary - Vauxhall road, London.
Brothers: George, Alfred, Charles.
Sisters: Ann, Maria.

5/7/1845: Employed by Edward A Edwards.

22/6/1852: TOL

14/12/1852: Permission to marry Bridget Moran, free.

20/12/1852: Married Bridget Moran at Hobart.
Children:
5/12/1853: Unnamed male.
2/9/1858: John Richard, registered at Campbell Town. - Mother listed as Bridget Maugham.
21/8/1860: Unnamed male, registered Launceston - father at Launceston, a brewer.
8/9/1862: Unnamed female, registered Launceston.  Father at Brisbane Street, a Cook.

9/2/1855: Misconduct in attemptin to obtain goods under false pretences - 6 months hard labour.

16/2/1855: TOL revoked.

6/3/1855: TOL
15/6/1855: Free Certificate.

26/9/1863 The Mercury, Hobart:
WRECK ON THE COAST.
The following notice was posted yesterday at the
Telegraph Office: -
REPORTED WRECK.
LAUNCESTON, Sept 25th, 9 am
Reported here that the schooner Creole has been wrecked near Waterhouse Island. The beach for miles is strewn with cattle, hay, &c. Oars, life buoy, bedding, and other articles with captain’s and ship’s name on have been found.
The above has been know among the inhabitants of the North Coast for the last three weeks, but has only been just reported.
In reference to the above, we find that the brigantine Creole, 131 tons, Captain Fluerty, cleared out at the Launceston customs for Dunedin on the 25th of August, and passed through Tamar Heads on the morning of the 29th August.
The following is a list of her passengers:
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. C. Townley and child, Miss Bain, Mrs. Green, Mr. Henry Clayton, Masters Clayton (2), Mrs. John Rattray and infant, Master Rattrays (2), Miss Rattray, W. Weymouth, Mr. James Dean.
Her crew composed seven men, and eight who were shipped as grooms, and their names were entered on the ships papers as follows:- Crew: Norman Clarke, John Cook, Richard Mortimer, Thomas Smith, William Wilson, Thomas Joyce, W. Dewar, Robert Thompson.
Grooms - Samuel Clewar, Frederick Gibbs, J. Lamont, Wm. Coleby, John Wilson, Thomas Green, and Audrew Stevenson. The Creole had, therefore, thirty-one souls on board, all of whom have, it is feared, perished.
*This is and edited version of a much longer article*.

26/12/1865: Bridget Mortimer, aged 34 married George Thomas Green, aged 41, at Launceston.
George was a widower and a boot maker.
Bridget was a widow.
Married in Mrs. Mortimer’s private house, Brisbane Street, Launceston.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Lois on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Richard Mortimer:

Richard John Mortimer, shipwreck ID 7020, Vessel name Creole Sailing vessel Brigantine, year 1863 Tasmania north east coast, 29th August, 1863, Australian National Shipwreck Database. All crew drowned Richard Mortimer was a crewman, who drowned. Mr Mortimer was my great great grandfather.

Robin Sharkey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of James Nangle:

“The Assizes of Kilkenny ended the 9th instant [August 1801], at which the following persons were tried before Baron George:
James Nangle, convicted of a felony at large, to be transported for seven years.”

Nangle made three attempts to sail to England - in 1811, 1812, and 1817, before he eventually managed to do so, being recorded in the 1825 Muster as “gone to England”. In the years between his 1801 sentence and his departure, the following is the record of him in NSW.

In 1806 Muster, in gaol at Parramatta

On the 29 December 1810, the American brig ‘Active’ came into Sydney Harbour under command of Capt Richardson, from the Isle of Bourbon (near the Ile de France), part of Mauritius, where it had left in November, bringing news of the surrender of that isle to the British.

James Nangle decided he would leave on this ship. First, he started tidying up his business. On the 5th January 1811 he advertised in the Sydney Gazette that he would sell the furniture, of little value, left in his house at Parramatta by William Ruffane about nine months earlier,  to pay the charges on the said furniture.
Then, on January 12 and January 19, 1811 he advertised his intention to leave the colony on “Active”, and requested, in the usual way, that any claims or demands on him be presented. However, further advertisements on January 26 of mens’ intentions to leave on ‘Active’ did not include James Nangle. The ship left on 5 February 1811.

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of John Browning:

Salisbury. Committed to Fisherton Gaol- John Browning, charged, on the oath of Margaret Dore, shopkeeper, of Stratton St Margaret, with having, on the 11th instant, disposed of and put away a forged £5 Bank of England note, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank.  Wm. Lee, convicted at the late assizes of passing a forged Bank of England note, remains for execution tomorrow at Fisherton.
Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 20 Mar 1820

Salisbury.
Tthe following convicts from Gaol, were Wednesday last put on board the Leviathan hulk, in Portsmouth harbour, viz. ..John Browning…
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 25 Sept 1820

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Samuel (the Younger) Staples:

Salisbury. Committed to Fisherton Gaol: Samuel Staples, jun. of the parish of Box, sawyer, charged with having in the night of the 30th of Nov. last (together with Thomas York, Joseph Dowley, and others) broken open the dwellinghouse of Hester Smith, in the said parish, and stolen from thence a sack, tin canister containing tea, several shawls, three shrowds, and many other articles, of the value of £100 and upwards.
Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 10 Jan 1820

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas York:

Thomas York, Joseph Dowley and Samuel Staples jun., for burglariously breaking into and robbing divers articles, the dwelling house of Hester Smith, at Box.
Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 6 Mar 1820

Conditional pardon, 9 Sep 1830, Free pardon,  16 Dec 1838
Stated wife at Bradford, Wilts.
Source: Tasmanian record CON31-1-45 Image 353

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of Samuel (the Younger) Staples:

Thomas York, Joseph Dowley and Samuel Staples jun., for burglariously breaking into and robbing divers articles, the dwelling house of Hester Smith, at Box.
Source:Salisbury and Winchester Journal, 6 Mar 1820

Free Pardon, 24 Feb 1835
N.P (native place) Turley, near Bradford. (Turley- a hamlet in Winsley parish, Wiltshire)
source: Tasmanian Record CON31/1/38 Image102

Maureen Withey on 7th April, 2019 wrote of George Jones:

Lent Assizes. The following prisoners were capitally convicted:...Joseph Greenaway and George Jones, for a burglary at Calne…. Of the above prisoners, only one, William Lee, convicted of uttering forged Bank of England notes, is left for execution; the rest are reprieved. Source: Morning Post, 15 Mar 1820.

Native place is Calne.Source: Tas Record Con31/1/23 Image 65

Lissa Kosovich on 7th April, 2019 wrote of William Paterson:

Stag ship sailed 2 Feb 1855 arrived Western Australia 23rd May 1855. Offence: Assault with intent to ravish. Court: Scotland: Stirling Court of Judiciary Glasgow 28 Sept 1852. 14 year sentence. Patterson William Convict # 3357. Occupation groom and carter. Aged 22 single, height 5’ 6 1/2”, hair light brown, eyes grey, face long, complexion fresh, middling stout, markings W.P. left arm, scar left wrist, second finger left hand

Lissa Kosovich on 7th April, 2019 wrote of William Harper:

Captain of ship was John E.W. Jackson. Arrived 4th July 1866. William Harper convict # 8873 aged 24, married, one child. He was a lace maker, height   5’ 2”,  hair dark brown, eyes light hazel, face oval, complexion fresh, middling stout, marks Ship on breast.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Phelps:

Salisbury. Thomas Phelps, charged on the oath of Robert Phelps, of Long Newnton, with stealing on the 17th ult., a promissory note of a guinea, a shirt, a pair of stockings,  and a handkerchief, the property of the said Robert Phelps, and also charged with escaping from the custody of Wm. Spencer, constable. Salisbury and Winchester Journal,14 Sep 1818

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of William Beckington:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…Wm Beckington, for stealing two pieces of cotton check, &c, the property of John Fox, Melksham;  Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of John Cottle:

Committed to Fisherton Gaol;  John Cottle, alias John Mustard, alias name unknown, charged with having, on Monday the ? of July last, stolen a fat bullock, the property of John Witchell, out of his field at Yatton Keynell.  Source: Salisbury and Winchester Journal,14 Sept 1818

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…John Cottle for stealing a bullock, the property of John Witchell, Yatton Keynell;  Source: Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Thomas Godwin:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence…Thos. and John Godwin, for stealing six pigs, belonging to Scammel, at Durrington; ... Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of John Godwin:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence ... Thos. and John Godwin, for stealing six pigs, belonging to Scammel, at Durrington;... Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Jacob Carter:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence ...Jacob Carter, for stealing thirty yards of Kerseymere, the property of Jacob Carpenter, Trowbridge; Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819.

Maureen Withey on 6th April, 2019 wrote of Israel Hooper:

The following prisoners were found guilty, and received sentence… Israel Hooper, for having broken open the house of J. Budd, Trowbridge, and stealing 140 lb of cheese and other articles;..Source:Hampshire Chronicle, Mon Mar 15 1819

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