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Thomas Ayling

Thomas Ayling, one of 148 convicts transported on the Midas, 07 October 1826

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Thomas Ayling
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1801
Occupation: Gentleman's servant
Date of Death: 10th September, 1872
Age: 71 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 54 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Sussex Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Midas
Departure date: 7th October, 1826
Arrival date: 15th February, 1827
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 147 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 93 (48). State Records NSW, COF (). Ancestry. NSW BDM.
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

John Phillips on 26th July, 2018 wrote:

The following is an article from The Brighton Gazette dated March 23, 1826:

“George Challen, 37, and Thomas Ayling, 22 indicted on suspicion of having in the night of the 18th of January, burglariously entered the dwelling house of John Colebrook, at Trotten, and stolen therefrom a teapot, carving knife, and other articles, value forty shillings, his property.
Mr. Long for the prosecution called Mrs. Colebrook, who said. I am wife of J. Colebrook, at Trotten, in this county; it is a lone house; myself, husband, and child, are the only inmates; I was the last person that was up in the house on the 18th January last, and saw that all was safe, when I went to bed. My husband got up first in the morning, he went out of the front door and took the key with him; that was between six and seven o’clock; it was nor quite light; I got up about seven and went into the cellar; observed the glass of the cellar window was out of its place; it slides up and down; there are iron bars to the window as well as on the outside, which was broken, and a hole made large enough for a person to get in; the bars were safe. In looking about found I had lost a side of pork, pot of lard, some knives and forks. The doors were quite safe, no one could reach the door from the window.
Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews - The house is by itself; it must be hard squeezing for a man to get through the hole in the window.
J. Colebrook corroborated the statement of his wife, and added, that from some information he went to search Challen’s house, at Harting, about 17 miles from Trotten, on the 20th January, and found a tea pot and some knives and forks; would swear positively to their being his property.
Cross-examined by Mr. Andrews - Can positively swear to the property, by some particular marks; thinks the men could get through the hole in the window.
James Cobden, the constable, who went with Colbrook to search Challen’s house, said in his cross-examination that he found the knives in a brook near the house.
Hannah Hunting proved she saw two men of the description of Challen and Ayling pass her gate with a horse and cart, about 12 o’clock in the day, going apparently towards Emsworth; knows Ayling very well.
James Chitty sworn - Saw Challen and Ayling going towards Hartling, about one mile and a half from that place, about half-past two in the afternoon.
Two other neighbours gave evidence to the same effect.
Wm. Steed proved he saw the prisoners at Trotten, with a horse and cart, very early in the morning of the 18th of January, as he was racking his master’s horses.
Ann Nash, whose evidence was unimportant, was called, as were also Wm. Lintott, the person who went with Colebrook in the search, and John Ayling, father to the prisoner, but no question was asked him.  Verdict - Guilty - Death Recorded.”

Evidently this sentence was commuted from death to transportation for life at a later date.

John Phillips, Western Australia.

Iris Dunne on 26th July, 2018 wrote:

Certificate of Freedom No.45/7 dated 1 February 1845, Aged 44, Year of Birth: 1801, Trade: Gentleman Servant & Laborer, Offence: Housebreaking

Iris Dunne on 26th July, 2018 wrote:

Death: Registration Year: 1872, Registration Place: Glebe NSW, Registration Number: 2023

Death: 10 Sep 1872 Grose St,Glebe, N.S.W. Australia - from Ancestry

Burial: 12 Sep 1872 Sydney, NSW, Australia
Church of England, Rookwood Cemetery, Lidcombe

Convict Changes History

John Phillips on 26th July, 2018 made the following changes:

crime

Iris Dunne on 26th July, 2018 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1804 (prev. 0000), gender: m

Iris Dunne on 26th July, 2018 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 93 (48). State Records NSW, COF (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 93 (48)), date o

Iris Dunne on 26th July, 2018 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 93 (48). State Records NSW, COF (). Ancestry. NSW BDM. (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page

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