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William Hollingsworth Butler

William Hollingsworth Butler, one of 209 convicts transported on the Hindostan, 05 October 1840

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: William Hollingsworth Butler
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1824
Occupation: Stonecutter
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 51 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 10 years

Crime: Larceny, before convicted of felony
Convicted at: Central Criminal Court
Sentence term: 10 years
Ship: Hindostan
Departure date: 5th October, 1840
Arrival date: 19th January, 1841
Place of arrival Van Diemen's Land
Passenger manifest Travelled with 208 other convicts

References

Primary source: Tasmanian Libraries. Old Bailey - online. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 91, Class and Piece Number HO11/12, Page Number 226
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Jo Featherston on 21st August, 2020 wrote:

The reason for WHB’s sentence and transportation was that he was convicted of stealing various articles from my ancestor Mary Ann Key’s toy shop in London. There is a record of his trial In the transcripts of the Old Bailey, which can be found online.William was aged 16 at the time, and the trial date was 2 March 1840.

Iris Dunne on 22nd August, 2020 wrote:

WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH BUTLER, Theft > simple larceny, 2nd March 1840.
848. WILLIAM HOLLINGSWORTH BUTLER was indicted for stealing, on the 14th of February, 1 oz. weight of cotton, value 3d.; 4 oz. weight of thread, value 9d.; 18 yards of tape, value 9d.; and 12 balls of cotton, value 6d., the goods of Thomas Key; and that he had been before convicted of felony.

THOMAS KEY . I live in Pared-street, Paddington, and am a labourer—my wife keeps a toy-shop, and sells cottons. I recollect about the 1st of February, hearing some glass falling in the street, (that was the first time the glass was cut)—I saw some boys in the street, and the prisoner was one of them—in consequence of that, I put some pasteboard up against the window. On the 14th of February I was in the shop, and saw the prisoner in the street—he plunged his hand into the broken pane, and I saw him extract sundry articles from the window—I ran out, and saw him drop the cotton just by the window—I pursued him, and in about half a minute he was taken is Market-street—when I stopped him, he fell on his knees and said, “Pray let me go; I have taken nothing, but I will discover to you the other parties who have taken your goods away”—I took him back to my shop, and gave him in charge—I know this cotton which I picked up

to be mine—I bought it in Coventry-street—I lost some other cotton from the window, which I had bought at the same place—I lost some thread also—the prisoner dropped this cotton, that I should stop and take it up, but I did not, and when I came back Mrs. Starling gave me the cotton which she had picked up—I am sure it is mine, and that the prisoner dropped it—I had been serving some of it not two minutes before.

GEORGE MERRETT (police-constable D 198.) I was on duty in Praed-street on the 14th of February—I went up to the prosecutor’s shop, and the prisoner was given to me—the prosecutor gave me this cotton—I found on the prisoner this knife, the point of which is ground in the shape of a putty knife, and this piece of wire, which is made into a hook to hook things out.

Prisoner. I was walking home—this gentleman came and took me—my father used this knife to put up putty with. Witness. He told me it was for cleaning bricks, and he said at the station it was for cleaning tools.

ALFRED BLUNDELL (police-sergeant T 9.) I produce a certificate of the prisoner’s former conviction, which I got at Mr. Clark’s office (read)—the prisoner is the person who was tried.

GUILTY . Aged 16.— Transported for Ten Years.
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=def1-848-18400302&div=t18400302-848#highlight

Iris Dunne on 22nd August, 2020 wrote:

Conduct Record: aged 16, Trade Stone cutter, Plasterer, Bricklayer, Laborer, Tried 2 March 1840, Protestant, can read a little, Single, Ticket of Leave 13 Feb. 1846, Free Cert. 4 March 1850
https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON33-1-4$init=CON33-1-4P19

Convict Changes History

Iris Dunne on 21st August, 2020 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1824 (prev. 0000), gender: m, crime

Iris Dunne on 22nd August, 2020 made the following changes:

source: Old Bailey - online. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 91, Class and Piece Number HO11/12, Page Number 226 (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 91, Class and Piece Number HO11/12, Page Number 226)

Iris Dunne on 22nd August, 2020 made the following changes:

crime

Iris Dunne on 22nd August, 2020 made the following changes:

source: Tasmanian Libraries. Old Bailey - online. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 91, Class and Piece Number HO11/12, Page Number 226 (prev. Old Bailey - online. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 91, Class and Piece Number

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au