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Samuel Challenger

Samuel Challenger, one of 192 convicts transported on the Albion, 29 May 1828

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Samuel Challenger
Aliases: Chalenger
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 5th September, 1794
Occupation: Ploughman and shepherd
Date of Death: 1859
Age: 64 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 54 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: York Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Albion
Departure date: 29th May, 1828
Arrival date: 3rd November, 1828
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 191 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 408 England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England Yorkshire - North Riding 1828 New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1828 Albion
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1794, 5 September: Samuel Challenger was born on this date and his baptism was registered at Darton All Saints, Yorkshire on 26 October 1794 (see West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812).

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1828, 22 March: A ploughman and shepherd, he appeared at the York Lent Assizes where he was sentenced to life for warehouse breaking and stealing. Benjamin GREEN, a weaver, who also appeared on the same charge, received the same sentence. Two other accomplices received sentences of two years and a third man was not prosecuted (see England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England Yorkshire - North Riding 1828; and New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1828 Albion).

1828: On arrival in NSW, he was 34 (born 1794), and married with four children, and had no previous convictions. He was 5’4” tall, with a ruddy complexion, dark brown hair and greenish eyes. He was sent into the service of Major George Druitt at Mount Druitt (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842; Bound Indentures 1827-1828). Note: Family researchers give his marriage date as 11 April 1814 to Margaret MacPhie and list three children from his first marriage.

Note about Major Druitt: George Druitt, “military officer, public servant and settler, was born probably in Ireland in 1775” and died in 1842. As a government civil engineer, “the public works he supervised included Fort Macquarie, the government stables, St James’s Church, the convict barracks and many roads and bridges, including those to South Head and Parramatta. In addition he controlled the dockyard and had responsibilities connected with the artillery and the quartermaster-general’s branch… What became the suburb of Mount Druitt, 43 km west of the centre of Sydney, was named by him; it is situated largely on [a grant]… of 2,000 acres approved by Governor Macquarie (see M. Austin, ‘Druitt, George (1775–1842)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, ANU, https://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/druitt-george-1994/text2431, accessed 6 February 2021).

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1829, 10 April: From the Australian, p3:
“SUPREME COURT.—(Criminal Side.)
“John Batterby, Samuel Challenger, Benjamin Green and Richard Chambers were indicted for burglary, at the house of Mr. Hall, at Bathurst, on the 27th of Dec. last. It was proved by James Roberts, an informer, that the prisoners, who are assigned servants to Major Druitt, agreed to rob Mr. Hall’s house, of which intention, Roberts having given information to Mr. Hogdon, chief constable, the latter, together with some more constables, planted themselves on the night in question near Mr. Hall’s house, and secured the prisoners just as they had broken open the window blind, and were endeavouring to move a pane of glass from the window— Guilty.”

A very lengthy account of the same trial was published on 11 April in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, p2. Some facts were at odds with the Australia’s report; for example, the Gazette reported that Mr Hall’s house was at Windsor and the burglary happened on 22 December. The prisoners, being found guilty, were remanded.

In a follow-up on 18 April, the Gazette reported:
“John Batley [not Batterby], Samuel Challenger, Benjamin Green, and Richard Chinn [not Chambers], for burglary – Death recorded.”

The Australian’s follow-up on 23 April read:
“CRIMINAL COURT. THURSDAY. The three learned Judges sat to pass sentence…for burglary; J. Battersby [not Batterby], Samuel Challenger, Benjamin Green, Richard Chin [not Chambers], death recorded…”
1829, 16 April: Sentenced by the Criminal Court, Sydney, for burglary – life commuted from death. Benjamin GREEN (per Albion 1828) faced a similar charge and received the same sentence. Both men were admitted to the Phoenix Hulk on this day (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Phoenix Hulk: Entrance Books, 1825-1831).

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1829, 16 August: Discharged from the Phoenix Hulk, along with Benjamin Green, to be sent to Moreton Bay per Waterloo (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Phoenix Hulk Discharge Book, 1825-1830).

1829, August: Aged 34 on admission, he arrived at Moreton Bay per Waterloo. So did Benjamin GREEN (see Kenneth J Lamb, Canberra 2013, Moreton Bay Convict Runaways database).

1830, 21 August: Between this date and 17 December 1834, Samuel Challenger ran away from Moreton Bay four times, and was at large for a total of 331 days.
1839: He is on a list of prisoners at Moreton Bay; and employed by the Surveyor’s Department (presumably this means a road gang; others not working for the SD are listed as servants, hospital attendants, shepherds, millers, boat pilots, etc). He also has X against his name. A notation says: “X Those marked thus are in the 1st Class” (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Moreton Bay Penal Establishment, 1839).

1839, 31 January: He was sent from Moreton Bay to Sydney Gaol (see Kenneth J Lamb, Canberra 2013, Moreton Bay Convict Runaways database).

1839, 9 May: He was sent to Sydney from Moreton Bay (see Kenneth J Lamb, Canberra 2013, Moreton Bay Convict Runaways database).

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1839: He is called Samuel CHALENGER on a list titled “Number of men in irons from Moreton Bay 1839” and listed as received on 14 October (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Miscellaneous Records of Ironed Gangs in Woolloomooloo, 1840).

1843, 27 October: Granted a Ticket of Leave No.43/2521 for the District of Windsor (see New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869).

1847, 21 October: Samuel Challenger, 53, per Albion, ToL, is granted permission to marry Jane McMenamy, 34, who arrived free, at Windsor (see New South Wales, Australia, Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry, 1826-1851; Granted 1847). The couple had two children according to family researchers.

1848, 1 September: Granted a Conditional Pardon No.48/1572; farm servant; year of birth given as 1796; 5’4” tall, ruddy complexion, dark brown hair and greenish eyes (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870; Conditional 1848 (Reel 788)).

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1849, 31 October: Is this “our” Samuel Challenger?

From The Sydney Morning Herald, p2: PARRAMATTA.

“ROBBERY.-Mr. Elliott, the Police Magistrate, has been engaged nearly every day for the last week investigating a case of robbery which appears to be enveloped in mystery, and (to use Mr. Elliott’s own words) perjury. The circumstances of the case are nearly as follows: a farming man named Samuel Challenger, residing at Cornwallis, near Windsor, was returning from market; on reaching Parramatta, he put up his horse at Mr. Fitzpatrick’s public house, got something to drink, and treated others who were present. He then left with a woman named Irwin for her house, where he slept all night. On Saturday morning, he left Irwin’s with his money all right, went to Jackson’s, where he changed a £5 note, returned to Fitzpatrick’s, and fell into company with another woman named Rice, who lives with a man servant of Jackson’s. Challenger treated the woman, who afterwards raised a fight Challenger was again decoyed to Irwin’s home, where were three women; he became stupid, went to sleep, and at six o’clock in the evening a constable awoke Challenger at Irwin’s with his pockets turned inside out-having been robbed of about £4 7s, and a silver watch; Jackson’s servant man and three women were before the Court for the robbery…”

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 wrote:

1859: Samuel Challenger’s death was registered at Camperdown, Newtown, Vol. No.V18597764 122B (see Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985).

In light of the above, the two entries below are puzzling:

1872, 13 March: Samuel Challenger admitted to Darlinghurst Gaol for being drunk; sentenced to two days’ imprisonment; released 14 March 1872 (see New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930; Entrance Book, Darlinghurst 1872).

1872, September: Samuel Challenger, 80 years old, per Albion, nil education, was admitted to Darlinghurst Gaol. No details of his charge are recorded (see New South Wales, Australia, Gaol Description and Entrance Books, 1818-1930; Description Book, Darlinghurst 1871-1872).

Convict Changes History

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 408 England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England Yorkshire - North Riding 1828 New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Re

Dianne Jones on 6th February, 2021 made the following changes:

alias1: Chalenger, date of death: 1859 (prev. 0000)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au