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William Davidson

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: William Davidson
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1770
Occupation: Coppersmith/brazier
Date of Death: 11th September, 1802
Age: 32 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 54 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Political prisoner
Convicted at: Ireland, Londonderry
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Minerva
Departure date: 24th August, 1799
Arrival date: 11th January, 1800
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 235 other convicts

References

Primary source: Belfast Newsletter, Monday 01 May 1797, p. 4. State Record of NSW, Convict ship Indents "Minerva". Burial Transcripts of Old Sydney Cemetery
Source description:

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Community Contributions

Robin Sharkey on 25th June, 2021 wrote:

IRISH CRIME:
reference - Belfast Newsletter, Monday 01 May 1797, p. 4.

In the report of his trial at Londonderry for administering an unlawful oath to one Patrick Hickey and also to one David Dobbin, William’s name was recorded as “Davison”.

It seems from the trial evidence that Davison was exposed by a man named Dobbin who Davison had sworn as a United Irishman, and this Dobbin had reported the fact to army captain who triggered Davion being arrested. 

The Patrick Hickey matter was not tried, as Hickey was too much in liquor and had begged not to be examined at that time. But William was found guilty on the Dobbin matter.  David Dobbin was a serjeant in the Tipperary Militia. One night in March 1797, Dobbin had gone with another soldier to a public house near Bishopsgate (Londonderry) to drink a glass of spirits and had seen William Davison in a back parlour with other men, who were four or five soldiers from his own Tipperary Regiment drinking and singing seditious songs. The men were in “coloured cloaths” which usually means they were in laymen’s clothes, not soldier’s clothes.

  Then about ten days later when Dobbin was on parade, William Davison was observing him closely and after parade asked Dobbin and another soldier to join him in a glass of punch. They first went to a house [public house?] near Bishopsgate, had two half pints of punch, then they went to another public house in the Bogside where Davison called for more liquor and began to talk to Dobbin telling him that if Dobbin would swear to keep something secret he would disclose something of use to Dobbin and his parents.
William Davison then administered to Dobbin an from a book, sworn on a bible, part of the oath being “to be true to the French and assist them if they land in this country and also to keep secret what then passed”. He instructed him in the signs of the United Irishmen which included always to shake hands with the left.
  Davison had arranged for two soldiers in the Tipperary Regiment to give evidence casting aspersions in Dobbin;s character and truthfulness. One, named Smyth said he knew Dobbin had been charged with theft and had twice perjured himself. Another, named Abraham, had observed Dobbin say that he was to be an orderly to Lord Cavan who’d told him he was a fine fellow – ie implying that Dobbin was to be rewarded for giving this evidence.
Regardless, Davison was found guilty by the Jury and received sentence of transportation for life. He was the only convict tried at Londonderry to sail on “Minerva”.
_________________________________________

Robin Sharkey on 25th June, 2021 wrote:

IRISH CRIME:
reference - Belfast Newsletter, Monday 01 May 1797, p. 4.

In the report of his trial at Londonderry for administering an unlawful oath to one Patrick Hickey and also to one David Dobbin, William’s name was recorded as “Davison”.

It seems from the trial evidence that Davison was exposed by a man named Dobbin who Davison had sworn as a United Irishman, and this Dobbin had reported the fact to army captain who triggered Davion being arrested. 

The Patrick Hickey matter was not tried, as Hickey was too much in liquor and had begged not to be examined at that time. But William was found guilty on the Dobbin matter.  David Dobbin was a serjeant in the Tipperary Militia. One night in March 1797, Dobbin had gone with another soldier to a public house near Bishopsgate (Londonderry) to drink a glass of spirits and had seen William Davison in a back parlour with other men, who were four or five soldiers from his own Tipperary Regiment drinking and singing seditious songs. The men were in “coloured cloaths” which usually means they were in laymen’s clothes, not soldier’s clothes.

  Then about ten days later when Dobbin was on parade, William Davison was observing him closely and after parade asked Dobbin and another soldier to join him in a glass of punch. They first went to a house [public house?] near Bishopsgate, had two half pints of punch, then they went to another public house in the Bogside where Davison called for more liquor and began to talk to Dobbin telling him that if Dobbin would swear to keep something secret he would disclose something of use to Dobbin and his parents.
William Davison then administered to Dobbin an from a book, sworn on a bible, part of the oath being “to be true to the French and assist them if they land in this country and also to keep secret what then passed”. He instructed him in the signs of the United Irishmen which included always to shake hands with the left.
  Davison had arranged for two soldiers in the Tipperary Regiment to give evidence casting aspersions in Dobbin;s character and truthfulness. One, named Smyth said he knew Dobbin had been charged with theft and had twice perjured himself. Another, named Abraham, had observed Dobbin say that he was to be an orderly to Lord Cavan who’d told him he was a fine fellow – ie implying that Dobbin was to be rewarded for giving this evidence.
Regardless, Davison was found guilty by the Jury and received sentence of transportation for life. He was the only convict tried at Londonderry to sail on “Minerva”.
_________________________________________

Penny-Lyn Beale on 15th October, 2021 wrote:

1802 - Burial Record
Old Sydney Burial Ground – Inventory
Name; William Davidson
Age; No Details
Burial; 11 Sept 1802
Remarks; Convict

Convict Changes History

Eric Harry Daly on 29th December, 2012 made the following changes:

convicted at, term 99 years, voyage, source, firstname, surname, alias1, alias2, alias3, alias4, date of birth 1770, date of death 11th September, 1802, gender, occupation, crime

Robin Sharkey on 25th June, 2021 made the following changes:

source: Belfast Newsletter, Monday 01 May 1797, p. 4. State Record of NSW, Convict ship Indents "Minerva". Burial Transcripts of Old Sydney Cemetery (prev. http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au Burial Transcripts of Old Sydney Cemetary)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au