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Richard Elliott

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Richard Elliott
Aliases: Elliot
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1765
Occupation: -
Date of Death: 1823
Age: 58 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 60 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: -
Convicted at: Westmeath Ireland
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Sugar Cane
Departure date: 12th April, 1792
Arrival date: 17th September, 1793
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 91 other convicts

References

Primary source: http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/convicts.htm
Source description:

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Community Contributions

Sl Bryant on 27th December, 2012 wrote:

Richard arrived on the convict ship “Sugar Cane” in 1793.No crime committed is found as yet.
He married Elinor Bolton who also was a convict, who arrived on ship ” Rolla ” in 1802.

?In September 1791, Richard was sentenced to life inprisonment and transportation( It is not known what the charges entailed). On April 12, 1793 he left from Cork on the “Sugar Cane”, one of two Irish convict ships that set sail that year. Travelling via Rio de Janeiro, the “Sugar Cane” arrived in Port Jackson on September 17.1793.

D Wong on 6th October, 2014 wrote:

Richard was 28 years old on arrival in NSW.
He married ELLEN or Elinor Bolton (per Rolla 1802).

They had 6 children, William (born 1807-1808), Owen (born 1811), Ellen (born 1812), Susan (born 1813), Richard (born 1814) and Ann (born 1819).

Richard died in June 1823 according to the reports below.

General Muster of 1823, Elinor was widowed and she was living with her children at Kissing Point.

From the research of Michelle Rawle-a direct descendant of Richard Elliott).
In the 1822 general Muster Richard is decsribed as “Gardener”
(Research):The following information is all from the Sydney Gazette - re - Richard Elliott.

22.7.1815
To be SOLD a number of choice FRUIT TREES, consisting of early Newington, China and Bengal Peaches, Pears, Plumb, and Damson Trees, from the age of three years - Apply to Richard Elliott, Kissing Point.

5.6.1823
MYSTERIOUS TRANSACTION - An inquest was held within the last few days on the body of Richard Elliott, an old settler of Kissing Point, who was found dead near to Captain Kent’s farm. Some of the apparel was discovered at a distance from the body, scattered in various directions; a quantity of blood was clearly seen on the ground close to the spot on which the body lay; the positon of which seemed to indicate the attitude of defence, no other verdict was returned, however, than Death by the Visitation of God.

12.6.1823
Reports that Old Elliott, Whose mysterious death was mentioned in the last Gazette at having happened in the vicinity of Kissing Point, was a terrible drunkard; that when in this state, he was in the habit (so said his wife before the inquisition) of sleeping in the woods, however inclement the season, for the whole nights and thus contracted excruciating pains in his body. When in these seasons of inebriety it was no way unusual for him to engage a stump or a tree and then overcome with the unequal contest, to lie down alongside his hardy protagonist and become lost in sleep. It could not be ascertained that a dispute had taken place between anyone and the deceased; that he had nothing to attract a robber, having expended all his little substance, as fast as it came in, in miserable rum; and no mark of violence presented itself. In fact there was not the least doubt in the minds of the jury, but that he “was drunk when he died”

19.6.1823
In endeavouring to get to the best information that is procurable; it is more than probable but that occasional misrepresentations may come to hand, or be foisted upon us. In the Gazette of the 5th instant we noticed a mysterious transcation that had taken place in the sudden death of Old Elliott.

In the report we thought that the truth, as near as could be obtained was published. But the week following official information notified to us that report was wrong; therefore it was promptly corrected.
During the last week, however, we have been respectfully informed, that there was certainly mysterious circumstances attending the old mans demise and however discovered upon examination of the head, that he was not inebriated when he died. It is thought that he must have received a blow (which may have been slight and quite unintentional) that caused the death. We have been informed also, that a man has been in custody upon the charge of killing the man.

Inge Elliott on 16th January, 2016 wrote:

I am direct Decendant of Richard Elliott .My records show he had 7 children The one missing is Mary Born 1805 Baptised 1812.  My husband and I have records from when Richard and Elanore arrived.Mosrt up untill 1982

Robin Sharkey on 26th March, 2016 wrote:

Richard and Eleanor Elliott had another child, in fact their first child, called Mary, born 1805. Mary married on 11 November 1821 to Alexander Rutledge at St John’s Parramatta. therefore she does not appear as living with her mother & siblings in the 1822 or 1825 Musters.

Richard Elliott had a small farm at Kissing Point.  It was located on the south side of the Government road, on its western side was Patfield’s farm and on the eastern side, James Wood’s farm. Whether Richard Elliott bought this land, or got it as a grant is not yet found on this research.

However after his death in 1823 his widow, on 31 October 1826, gifted this 28 acre farm to her son-in-law, Alexander Rutledge in consideration “of the natural love and affection which she bears towards the said daughter [i.e. Mary] and the said Alexander Rutledge.” The only consideration to be paid was 5s.
Mary may have remained on this land since in 1828 she was at Kissing Point and the Rutledges lived in Castlereagh St in Sydney (his trade was carpenter).

One wonders what handing over the small asset the family owned to a son-in-law did to family relations between the Rutledges/ Eleanor and her other five children!

Richard Elliott was described in 1796, well before he married Eleanor Bolton/Sullivan, as a ‘notorious character’ (together with Luke Normington) when he and Normington were detected in a suspicious situation in the commissar’s stockyard full of sheep and other stock. Later, on 29 Nov 1796,  Elliott and several others were in court charged with robberies at the Commissar’s stores over a period of ten months. There were many witnesses but Elliott and another man, Griffiths, were acquitted.

Phil Hands on 16th March, 2017 wrote:

Tried and convicted at Westmeath in 1791, sentenced to transportation for life.
Left Cork on 12th April 1793.
Ship:- the ‘Sugar Cane’ sailed with 110 male and 50 female convicts on board of which 1 male died during the voyage (Executed for “mutinous intent”.
Arrived on 17th September 1793.

In the early 1800s (probably 1804), he began living with Elinor Bolton (convict ‘Rolla’ 1803), this was a common law union., that produced 8 children between 1805-1816.
By 1805/1806, his fortune had turned ,and by now had been assigned a servant (convict Edward Banks, who had arrived on the Fortune in 1806).

In the 1822 general Muster Richard is decsribed as ‘Gardener.

Sydney Gazette Saturday 22nd July 1815
To be SOLD a munber of choice FRUIT TREES, consisting of early Newington, China and Bengal Peaches, Pears, Plumb, and Damson Trees, from the age of three years - Apply to Richard Elliott, Kissing Point.

Sydney Gazette Thursday 5th June 1823 p. 2
MYSTERIOUS TRANSACTION-
An Inquest was held within the last few days on the body of Richard Elliott, an old settler at Kissing-point, who was found dead near to Captain Kent’s farm. Some of his apparel was discovered at a distance from the body, scattered in various directions; a quantity of blood was clearly to be seen on the ground close to the spot on which the body lay; the position of which seemed to indicate an attitude of defence. Np other verdict was returned however, than “Death by the Visitation of God’.

Sydney Gazette Thursday12th June1823
Reports that Old Elliott, Whose mysterious death was mentioned in the last Gazette at having happened in the vicinity of Kissing Point, was a terrible drunkard; that when in this state, he was in the habit (so said his wife before the inquisition) of sleeping in the woods, however inclement the season, for the whole nights and thus contracted excruciating pains in his body. When in these seasons of inebriety it was on way unusual for him to engage a stump or a tree and then overcome with the unequal contest, to lie down alongside his hardy protagonist and become lost in sleep. It could not be ascertained that a dispute had taken place between anyone and the deceased; that he had nothing to attract a robber, having expended all his little substance, as fast as it came in, in miserable rum; and no mark of violence presented itself. In fact there was not the least doubt in the minds of the jury, but that he “was drunk when he died”

Sydney Gazette Thursday 19th June 1823 p. 2
In endeavouring to get at the best information that is procurable, it is more than probably but that occasional misrepresentations may come to hand, or be foisted upon us. In the gazette of the 5th instant, we noticed a “mysterious transaction” that had taken place in the sudden death of “Old Elliott”. In that report we thought that the truth, as near as could be obtained, was published. But the week following official information notified to us that “that” report was wrong’ therefore it was promptly corrected. During the last week however, we have been respectably informed, that there certainly “were” mysterious circumstances attending this old man’s demise; and, however, habituated to drunkenness he might have been, eminent surgical penetration discovered, upon examination of the head, that he was not inebriated when he died. It is thought that he must have received a blow (which might have been very slight, and quite unintentional) that occasioned death. We have been informed also, that a man has been in custody upon the charge of killing the old man.

Convict Changes History

Sl Bryant on 27th December, 2012 made the following changes:

convicted at, term 99 years, voyage, source, firstname, surname, alias1, alias2, alias3, alias4, date of birth 1765, date of death 1823, gender, occupation, crime

D Wong on 6th October, 2014 made the following changes:

voyage, source: http://members.pcug.org.au/~ppmay/convicts.htm (prev. ), alias1: Elliot

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au