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Patrick Flanigan

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Patrick Flanigan
Aliases: Russell, Flannagan, Flannigan
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1797
Occupation: Stable boy
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 53 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Assault and attempted robbery
Convicted at: Ireland. Kildare
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Mary
Departure date: 25th May, 1819
Arrival date: 26th August, 1819
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 160 other convicts

References

Primary source: NSW Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; Irish Convicts to New South Wales 1788-1849, by Peter Mayberry
Source description:

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Community Contributions

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 wrote:

OCCUPATION: Stable man (see NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842; Bound Indentures 1818-1819).

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 wrote:

CRIME: Assaulting to rob (see NSW Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849).

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 wrote:

1818, 25 July: Admitted to Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin; transferred by the Government (see Ireland, Prison Registers, 1790-1924; Dublin, Kilmainham, 1815-1910).

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 wrote:

1819, 25 August: Patrick FLANIGAN or RUSSELL 22, 5’10½”, dark ruddy complexion, black hair, hazel eyes, native place County Kildare (see NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842; Bound Indentures 1818-1819).

Dianne Jones on 3rd August, 2020 wrote:

1823, 11 April: Patrick FLANNAGAN [FLANIGAN] per Mary 1819 assigned to James Philips at Newcastle (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; List of Assigned Convicts Non-Mechanics, 1822-1824).

1823, 17 December: Patrick FLANNIGAN or RUSSELL on a list of convicts transported to Port Macquarie on the brig Lady Nelson – sent there for the remainder of his original sentence [of seven years], by Thomas Moore Esq. of the Bench at Liverpool, on 2 Dec 1823 (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Port Macquarie Penal Settlement: List of Convicts, 1822-1825).

Dianne Jones on 7th August, 2020 wrote:

1824, 11 May: Patrick FLANIGAN – issued with a Certificate of Freedom #19/2180 (see CoF issued in 1840).

1824, August: Transported to Norfolk Island for life for house robbery (see below).

1825: Pat (Patrick) FLANIGAN – convict – Mary 1819, 7 years; employed by government, Port Macquarie servant to James Duffy, Evan (see NSW and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849, New South Wales General muster A-L 1825).

1826, December: Patrick FLANIGAN was one of a number of prisoners, aboard the brig Wellington, bound for Norfolk Island. But the Wellington took a detour, as reported in the Sydney Gazette on 10 February, 1827, p2:

“[On 21 December 1826] the brig Wellington, belonging to Mr. Joseph Underwood, was carrying prisoners to Norfolk Island, with the notorious Anthony Best, and other criminals on board, when within two days sail of her destination, [she] was piratically captured by the convicts — the captain, crew, and troops made prisoners — and Mr. Buchanan, the engineer, had his head laid open with a musket.

“As soon as the vessel was in their possession, the pirates made for New Zealand, where it providentially happened that the Sisters was lying at anchor off the Bay of Islands. We hear that an action commenced between the pirates and the whaler, which lasted for six hours, in which two of the former were killed. Captain Duke then went on board with a flag of truce, and declared if they did not surrender, he would bear down upon them, assisted with 200 or 300 natives, and put every man to death. This had the effect, and the pirates surrendered. Some of them, however, made their escape on shore, but by means of the extraordinary exertions of Captain Duke, assisted by the natives, the whole were soon retaken.

“The following is a list of the gang which have been brought back to Sydney, on the Sisters—the remainder being on board the Wellington, which was off the heads yesterday evening late, having Anthony Best on board:—

John Walton, ex-captain of the pirates; Charles Clay Todhunter, James O’Neal, Henry Drummond, Charles Daley, William Leddington, William Ryan, William Holt, John Jennings, John Lynch, William Webb, Patrick Flannigan [FLANIGAN, per Mary 1], Cornelius Callaghan, John Stewart, Thomas Quin, Richard Johnson, Thomas Edwards, Edward McGuiness, John Swan, Richard Carter, Thomas Carvell, William Brown, Patrick Geary, James Bennet, John Smith, Thomas Bayley, Edward Colethurst, William Bateman, John McGuinness, Abraham Davis, William Walker, John Boyde.”

Dianne Jones on 7th August, 2020 wrote:

1827, 9 Feb: Patrick FLANIGAN #399, per Mary 1, Catholic, on a list of men received on board the prison Hulk Phoenix, “having been in transit to Norfolk Island on the brig Wellington when a group of prisoners took possession of the vessel”, before being recaptured (Source: Convict Records, 1810-1891, Phoenix Hulk: Entrance Books, 1825-1831).

1827, 21 Feb: Patrick FLANIGAN or RUSSELL was discharged from the Phoenix Hulk and “sent to Sydney gaol preparatory to trial for piratically seizing the brig Wellington” (Source: Convict Records, 1810-1891, Phoenix Hulk: Discharge Book, 1825-1830).

Dianne Jones on 7th August, 2020 wrote:

1827, 21 February: From the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser, p3: Supreme Criminal Court):

“Tuesday, 20 February - John Walton, William Douglas, John Edwards, Charles Clay alias Todhunter, John Smith, Richard Hicks, William Browne, John Lynch, Edward Colthurst, Charles Daley, James O’Neil, and William Ryan were indicted for piratically seizing the brig Wellington, the property of Mr. Joseph Underwood, of Sydney, together with a quantity of clothing and arms, the property of the Crown, on the high seas, about 40 leagues distant from Norfolk Inland, on the 21st of December last… the jury found all the prisoners Guilty. Remanded.”
There is no detail in the press about what happened to Patrick FLANIGAN. However, he was certainly returned to Norfolk Island under a sentence of life for his part in the Wellington’s seizure, according to his Certificate of Leave granted in 1840. His life sentence was reduced in 1839, as follows:

1839, 13 November: Patrick FLANNAGAN per Mary is one of seven prisoners on Norfolk Island to have his sentence reduced to 14 years “in consideration of their exertions in rescuing the ship ‘Indemnity’ from a situation of extreme danger” (see New South Wales, Australia, Convict Records, 1810-1891; Convicts Records; Colonial Secretarial Register of Sentences Remitted, 1838-1841).

What was that extreme danger? In 1839, after a refit in Sydney, the Indemnity was employed to carry supplies to Norfolk Island (see Sydney Herald, 12 April). With her first cargo of government stores, including cattle, she arrived at Norfolk Island in May. By 19 June 1839, the Indemnity was back in Sydney with 8000 bushels of maize for the Government from Norfolk Island (see Commercial Journal and Advertiser, 19 June, p2). She sailed again for Norfolk Island in July and arrived back in Sydney on 6 September with a cargo of convicts, as well as maize and barley. Later the same month, she sailed for Hobart Town with a cargo of table rice. There are no reports in the New South Wales press of any misadventures involving the Indemnity at Norfolk Island from May to December 1839.

Dianne Jones on 7th August, 2020 wrote:

1840, 1 October: Patrick FLANAGAN or RUSSELL – Certificate of Freedom #40/1630 – per Mary 1, 1819; native place Co Kildare; labourer; offence highway robbery; tried Kildare, Summer 1817, seven years; born 1797; 5’10½”, sallow complexion, brown hair mixed with grey, hazel eyes. Tattoos – P*F H x D Cross x FPF inside right arm; mark ball of right thumb. “Was transported to Norfolk Island for life by the Criminal Court, Sydney, in August 1824 for house robbery and again for life in February 1827 for piratically seizing the Brig Wellington on her way to that settlement.”

Convict Changes History

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: years, voyage, source: NSW Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; Irish Convicts to New South Wales 1788-1849, by Peter Mayberry (prev. ), firstname: Patrick, surname: Flanigan, alias1: , alias2: , alias3: , alias4:

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: 7 years, voyage, crime

Dianne Jones on 19th July, 2020 made the following changes:

alias1: Russell

Dianne Jones on 7th August, 2020 made the following changes:

alias2: Flannagan, alias3: Flannigan

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