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Thomas Harrison

Thomas Harrison, one of 200 convicts transported on the Katherine Stewart Forbes, 07 October 1829

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Thomas Harrison
Aliases: none
Gender: -

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: -
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Median life span was 58 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: -
Convicted at: Surrey Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Katherine Stewart Forbes
Departure date: 7th October, 1829
Arrival date: 18th February, 1830
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 200 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/7, Page Number 227 (116)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Anonymous on 29th July, 2011 wrote:

Thomas Harrison is my G.G.G. Grandfather.
I can be contacted at: ted.harrison@optusnet.com.au
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Thomas Harrison was born in the County of Kent, England in c.1795. (believed to be in Kingston)

He was a farmer/grazier when at age 34, at Kingston, County Kent, he was charged with horse stealing and was committed to trial at the Surrey Assizes. He stood trial on the 30-March-1829 and was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment which was later changed to ‘Transportation to the Colony of New South Wales’. It is believed that he left a wife and three sons.

After spending eight months on a rotting hulk moored in the Thames river, he was transported to the Colony aboard the Barque ‘Catherine Stewart Forbs’, a fully rigged Convct Transport, 457 ton barque, captained by Thomas Canny with Pat McTernan as the ship’s surgeon; leaving Spithead on the 14-October-1829 carrying 200 male convicts. The barque arrived in Port Jackson via the Cape of Good Hope on the 18-February-1830, after 127 days at sea with 199 convicts (one convict having died enroute). On his arrival, he was described as being: 5 feet 9 inches tall with a ‘ruddy’ complexion, hair brown to grey, bald, his eyes were grey, and he had two small scars on his forehead.

He was residing in Goulburn, south-west of Sydney, when in January 1838 the Goulburn Bench recommended him for a ‘Ticket of Leave’ and it was officially granted on the 19-May-1838.

In 1841, Sir George Gipps, Governor of New South Wales, ordered a Census to be taken of the population of the colony. It was discovered that Thomas Harrison was the occupier of a stone or brick house in Auburn Street, Goulburn and was carrying on a business of shop keeper (butcher). He must have been reasonably well off as he had a male and female servant who were married and had a son over the age of fourteen living on the premises.

It is assumed that on or about 1842 one of his sons, Edmund, arrives in Goulburn from England to visit his father.

On the 5-August-1845 He witnesses his son, Edmund’s marriage to Eliza Louisa Wilson in the church of Saint Saviour, Goulburn.

On the 13-August-1845 he was granted his ‘Conditional Pardon.’

On the 30-April-1849 Thomas Harrison suffers a stroke and is confined to bed in the house of Catherine and Joseph Reid.

On Saturday 2-June-1849 Thomas Harrison dies. The funeral ceremony was performed in the parish of St Saviour by the Rev William Sowerby and he is buried on the 4-June-1849 in the Old Pioneers Cemetery, Goulburn. The grave is unlocatable.

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au