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Charles Hawkins

Charles Hawkins, one of 270 convicts transported on the Nile, 18 September 1857

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Charles Hawkins
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1833
Occupation: Plaisterer
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 51 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 15 years

Crime: Burglary
Convicted at: Somerset, Taunton Assizes
Sentence term: 15 years
Ship: Nile
Departure date: 18th September, 1857
Arrival date: 1st January, 1858
Place of arrival Western Australia
Passenger manifest Travelled with 270 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 93, Class and Piece Number HO11/18, Page Number 243 (123). England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England; Somerset; 1856. Western Australian Convicts at http://www.perthdps.com/convicts/w4615.htm
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 wrote:

TRIAL:

27 March, 1856: Charles HAWKINS, #53, was convicted at the Assizes, held at the Castle of Taunton, on a charge of “burglary with violence, before convicted of felony”. He was sentenced to death, commuted (England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England; Somerset; 1856).

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Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 wrote:

JAILS:

27 March, 1856: Charles HAWKINS, 23, convicted for a felony at Taunton Lent Assizes and sentenced to 15 years’ transportation, is on a list of “Prisoners upon order in HM Gaol at Taunton” (Taunton Gaol, Somerset: Calendars of Trials At Sessions and Assizes For the County of Somerset; UK, Prison Commission Records, 1770-1951; Taunton Gaol; Calendar of Trials to 1889).

He was held in separate confinement at Taunton for 5 months 1 day (Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930
Convict Department, Registers; Character Book for Nos 4508-5585 (R8)).

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Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 wrote:

28 August, 1856: From Taunton, he went to Millbank at Westminster in London. Listed as #3430, he was 23, married, CofE, a plasterer, able to read and write imperfectly and sentenced to 15 years’ transportation (death recorded) for burglary with violence. Next of kin — his wife, Esther Hawkins of Bedminster Down, near Bristol.

By the 1850s, Millbank and Pentonville were places for all male convicts to serve “their probationary term [of 9 months], after which they would be transported or sent to a public works prison” (https://www.prisonhistory.org).

Charles Hawkins served 8 months 8 days in separate confinement (UK, Prison Commission Records, 1770-1951; Millbank Prison; Register of Prisoners to 1885).

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Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 wrote:

6 May, 1857: He was admitted to Chatham, a public works prison for male convicts east of London, at St Mary’s Island, in Kent (https://www.prisonhistory.org).

On the record of “male transports” from Chatham per Nile to WA he was listed as #959, 23 years old, married, a plasterer, able to read and write imperfectly and convicted for “burglary with violence”. His behaviour in separate confinement was listed as “good” and also “good” in public works jails (Western Australia, Australia, Convict Records, 1846-1930; Convict Department, Registers; Convicts Transported Per Nile (R32)).

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Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 wrote:

IN WA:

From his Fremantle jail record:

HAWKINS, Charles; #4656, arrived 1 Jan 1858 per Nile
Date of Birth: 1833
Marital Status: Married 1 child
Occupation: Plasterer
Literacy: Semiliterate

Sentence Place: Taunton, Somerset, England
Crime: Burglary with violence
Sentence Period: 15 years, commuted

Ticket of Leave Date: 25 Feb 1860
Conditional Pardon Date: 6 Sep 1862
Certificate of Freedom Date: 10 Apr 1871

Comments: To New South Wales, 19 Jan 1872 (https://fremantleprison.com.au/).

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Dianne Jones on 10th January, 2022 wrote:

FOOTNOTE 1:

NEWSPAPER REPORT OF THE TRIAL

From the ‘Weekly Dispatch’, April 13, 1856, p.11:

“WESTERN CIRCUIT - TAUNTON

Before Mr. Justice Crowder

George Rogers, Henry Dufferty, Charles Hawkins, Thomas Dallmiore, William Oldfield, Joseph Taylor, Mark Fawkes, William Belston, and William Ryan were indicted for having, on the 6th of December, burglariously broken and entered the house of Mary Baber, and stealing a spoon, a ring, a pencil-case, three spoons, a watch-guard, and £8 in money, and beating and striking James Veale, otherwise Flower, on the head.

It appeared from the evidence of numerous witnesses, that the house of the prosecutrix is situated by itself about 100 yards from the high road, and that the inmates on Thursday, the 6th of December, consisted of Mrs. Baber; her sister, Mrs. Hopkins; a female servant, named Elizabeth Cambridge; Mrs. Baber’s uncle, Mr. Jones; and a man-servant named James Veale.

On the evening of the day in question, all the inmates of the house went to bed at the usual time, the servant having previously seen that the fastenings were all secure. About 8 o’clock on the morning of the 7th of December, the house was broken into, and almost simultaneously two men entered the room of Mr. Jones, two that of Mrs. Baber, one that of Mrs. Hopkins, while another held the door of room in which the maid-servant slept. The two men who entered the room of Mr. Jones committed an act of gross outrage. They struck Veale, the man-servant, a violent blow with a life preserver which drew the blood from his head, then rolled him up in the bed-clothes so as to prevent him from observing what was going on.

[DRAWING OF THE WEAPON DESCRIBED BELOW]

  The “Life Preserver” is a formidable weapon having a flexible shaft,
  8” long, possibly of whale-bone, and a lead weighted end, bound
  with cord. In use it was intended to be aimed at the arms or legs in
  order to disable the assailant. A blow to the head could easily
  result in fatal injuries.

At this time, Mrs. Baber, hearing the noise in her uncle’s room, sprang out of bed, bolted her door, and was about to give an alarm when two men burst into her room. They did not offer any actual violence to Mrs. Baber, but they threatened her, and said it would be of no use to make any noise as there were twenty of them outside. These men had their faces covered with something black, so that Mrs. Baber was unable to distinguish their features, but one of them kept watch over her for half an hour and she had ample opportunities of observing the other. She spoke positively to Rogers and Duffety being the two men who came into her room. As to the maid-servant, no one broke into her room and, consequently, she saw nothing, but she heard much. She spoke to one of the men who were outside her room having a very peculiar footstep, and the prisoner Hawkins was a person with a malformation in his legs, which caused a strange manner of walking; in addition to which, there was this fact against him, that, his house being searched, a quantity of housebreaking implements were found, among which were a chisel and a turn-screw, which exactly corresponded with the marks on the part of the premises by which access was gained. Mr. Jones was an old gentleman, upwards of 80, and Mrs. Hopkins a highly nervous lady; so that they were not able to identify any of the prisoners.

Independently of money, the booty of the of the burglars was exceedingly small, and none of the stolen property was traced to the possession of the accused. The only direct evidence in the case was that of Mrs. Baber against Rogers and Duffety, and the facts already mentioned respecting Hawkins.

As regarded all the other prisoners, the prosecution relied almost entirely on the evidence of an abandoned woman named Emma Bryant, the paramour of Ryan; but her statements were exceedingly contradictory.

Rogers, Duffety and Hawkins were Convicted and had sentence of death recorded against them. Ryan and Dallimore, convicted on the previous day of a burglary at Stanton Prior, were sentenced, Ryan to 14 years transportation, and Dallimore to four years’ penal servitude. Mark Faux subsequently pleaded Guilty to a charge of receiving part of the property of another burglary at Marksbury, and was sentenced to four years penal servitude. Oldfield, Rich and Belstone were discharged.” (Western Australian Convicts at http://www.perthdps.com/convicts/w4615.htm).

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Dianne Jones on 10th January, 2022 wrote:

FOOTNOTE 2:

George Rogers, Henry Dufferty and Charles Hawkins were transported to WA aboard the Nile.

William Ryan’s arrival in WA was much later, on 29 May 1863, per the Clyde.

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Convict Changes History

Ann Marie Gould on 14th March, 2020 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1833 (prev. 0000), gender: m, crime

Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 made the following changes:

occupation

Dianne Jones on 19th December, 2021 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 93, Class and Piece Number HO11/18, Page Number 243 (123). England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England; Somerset; 1856. (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 93, Class

Dianne Jones on 10th January, 2022 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 93, Class and Piece Number HO11/18, Page Number 243 (123). England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892; England; Somerset; 1856. Western Australian Convicts at http://www.perthdps.com/convicts/

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au