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Mary Heard

Mary Heard, one of 121 convicts transported on the Morley, 17 May 1820

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Mary Heard
Aliases: Davis (alias)
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1799
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 56 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 14 years

Crime: Possessing a forged note
Convicted at: London Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 14 years
Ship: Morley
Departure date: 17th May, 1820
Arrival date: 30th September, 1820
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 123 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/3, Page Number 327 (165)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Maureen Withey on 16th February, 2020 wrote:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 16 February 2020), February 1820, trial of MARY HEARD (t18200217-17).

ANN FARRELL, SARAH FARRELL, MARY GOULD, SUSAN MARR, MARY JONES,  ANN CURTIS,  MARY HEARD, Royal Offences > coining offences, 17th February 1820.

366. GEORGE STEWART , ALBINE COOK, WILLIAM OWEN , JOHN COATES , WILLIAM SCOTT , JAMES LANG , MICHAEL LAMBERT , THOMAS PHILLIPS , WILLIAM QUIN , JAMES RILEY , JAMES ARCHBALD , HENRY LEWIS , THOMAS MARTIN , HENRY BUCKNELL , WILLIAM HARRIS , ANN FARRELL , SARAH FARRELL , MARY GOULD , SUSAN MARR , MARY JONES , DANIEL LUCAS , JOHN CURTIS , ANN CURTIS , WILLIAM ROSE , MARY HEARD , and JOHN CARTER were severally and separately indicted for having in their custody and possession, forged Bank notes, knowing them to be forged .

To which indictments the prisoners severally and separately pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Before Mr. Baron Graham .

Robin Sharkey on 7th September, 2021 wrote:

Mary Heard, alias Davies, was said to be 34 yrs old when she pleaded guilty in the Old Bailey to possessing a forged note.

British Neptune, Monday 21 February 1820, p 6
OLD BAILEY Saturday 19 February
“This day, Mary Hurd, alias Mary Davies, and John Carter, severally pleaded guilty to the minor offence of having forged notes in their possession. This plea Subjects them to fourteen years transportation.”

There were many in the Old Bailey that day charged with forgery. Most did a kind of plea deal with the prosecuting Bank of England: As the ‘Morning Chronicle’ of the same date, on p.4 explained it:
“The above twenty were allowed to plead Guilty to the minor offence, of having the notes in their possession knowing them to be forged. They were afterwards put to the bar on the capital charge, but no evidence was offered against them. They are, however, subjected to transportation for fourteen years. We regret to say, that several of them behaved with a levity most disgraceful, laughing in the Court, and making a dreadful noise in the bail-dock, after being taken down.”

Mary and the other six women who pleaded guilty to possession of forged notes that day, sailed on the ship “Morley”. On 23rd April 1820, all the women from Newgate Prison were taken by lighter down the river to where the Morley was at anchor at Galleon’s Reach (near Woolwich in S/E London).

On 6th May the Bank of England provided 5 pounds to all those women on board who had been convicted of possessing, or uttering, forged notes (41 women in all). See the book by the ship’s surgeon, Thomas Reid, “Two Voyages to New South Wales and Van Diemens Land”.  The money was a philanthropic gift, to help them in their distress. In the afternoon on the same day the Keeper of NewGate Gaol also came on board to give each of the Newgate women one guinea.

On 20th May the ship weighed anchor and moved down to Gravesend, then was ta the Downs on the afternoon of 22nd May and thereafter went under full sail away from England.

AT Hobart on 1st September, fifty of the women were offloaded, before the Morley proceeded to Sydney, anchoring in the harbour on 13th September.

Robin Sharkey on 7th September, 2021 wrote:

_______________________________________

LIFE IN NSW

Mary “Herd” was assigned to a new Ticket of Leave convict named Robert Winter. Winter was working a plot of land in eh Windsor area having arrived in 1812 on “Guildford” and being assigned since then to Mr Nicholas Bayley.

In 1821 Mary Herd married her master, Robert Winter. [NSWBDM “Winters” and “Herd” Ref: 817/1821 V18212817 3B]. In the 1825 muster the landholding where they resided was recorded as being at “Evan”. This area is near the Nepean river, near Penrith.

After this, the two end up in serious trouble

BURGLARY at the NEPEAN

Winter’s plot was near the Nepean river. “Mt Pleasant” was a successful farm owned by wealthy emancipist Samuel Terry (who didn’t live there, but was in Pitt St in Sydney), on the Nepean River near present day Cranebrook. In 1825, John Hancock was recorded as assigned to one Waterman, residing at Evan. In 1828 William Waterman was a hutkeeper out at “Canberry” on the Molonglo River when John Tennant held up the hut (see beliow).

The Sydney Gazette, Sat 18 November 1826, p3:
“THURSDAY, 16th Nov. -Robert Winter, and John Handcock, were indicted as principals, for a burglary in the house of Mr. Samuel Terry, at Mount Pleasant, in the district of Evan, and stealing
therefrom a quantity of wheat, in bags, on the 1st
of August last. Mary Winter was also indicted as accessary before, and John Little as accessary
after, the fact, to the commission of the above burglary and robbery.
Verdict. Winter GUILTY, Remanded.
Hancock and Little NOT GUILTY
Mary Winter DISCHARGED from the dock for want
of evidence.

On 18 November 1826 Robert was given a sentence of “death recorded” and sent to Moreton Bay.

MARY’s LIFE, POST ROBERT WINTER

Mary Winter took up with an escaped convict named John Tennant.  Tennant became well known for ‘bushranging’ around Canberra.  Originally from Belfast, he had arrived on ‘Prince Regent’ in 1824, a ploughman, thatcher & fencer. Although he was assigned to Mr J J Moore at Argyle, he also had been sent to an iron gang for some misdemeanour, and he escaped from this iron gang. According to research by James McDonald, Tennant had earlier been working in an iron gang on the opposite bank of the Nepean River at Emu Plains, to where the Winters lived.
  [“Winter in Argyle: Unearthing Canberra’s Female Bushranger”, Canberra Historical Journal, vol. 84 (March), 2020, pp. 11-16].

Tennant had escaped the iron gang in October 1826 (see McDonald, ibid). Robert Winter was indicted in November 1826, and Mary was discharged. Somehow, she found the absconded John Tennant.

In “The Sydney Gazette” of 7th, 10th & 12th Sept 1827, p.1, there was a reward of 20 pounds for apprehending 32 yr old John Tennant. He was a ‘runaway from an Iron Gang’ and for a considerable time had been ‘at large in the neighbourhood of Goulburn Plains and committed numerous depradations on the residents.”

During 1827 however it seems he was accompanied by Mary Winter. A story appeared in ‘The Monitor’ of 15 Oct 1827 p.8, of a constable coming across the two of them while fishing on the banks of the Yass River, and being threatened by Tennant. There was another story of Mrs Winter, with pistols, and Tennant, entering a hut occupiu]ed by seven men, and Mary standing guard with her pistols while Tennant ground his wheat in their hand mill for an hour.

From this article, it has been taken by historians that Mary Winter was bushranging with John Tennant. In late 1827 he was teamed up with two others and held up Piallago station near Canberry station. Mrs Winter was not mentioned.  Tennant was captured in early January 1828 after sticking up J J Moore’s station ‘Canberry’ on the Molonglo River -some of the men working there knew him from before. He was convicted in late February 1828 and sentenced to hang but was instead commuted to life imprisonment and sent to Norfolk Island in October 1829. In Sept 1836 he was sent back to NSW from Norfolk Island (Col Sec Letters) but died at Windsor Hospital in 1837 (Convict Death Register).

What of Mary Heard once Tennant was captured?
She was still under convict sentence, her 14 years not expiring until February 1835. It seems that she was found, and sent back to the female ‘prison’, the Female Factory at Parramatta.

* In the 1828 Census (Oct/nov): Mary Winters, aged 33, protestant, arrived per Morley in 1820, Convict, inmate at the Government factory at Parramatta.
*In the convicts & employers list for 1832, she was a convict servant with Charles Staples in Pitt Street.
* In January 1833 “age 31” she was a convict housekeeper with Alexander Rutledge. Howevefr she absconded from from him, ‘Absconded Convicts” notice signed 16 January 1833. But she was not absconded for long:

NSW Gov Gazette, Wed 30 January 1833 p 48
“List of runaways apprehended up to the 28th January 1833.
“Mary Winters, Morley, from Mr A. Rutledge”

* IN 1835 she got her certificate fo Freedom through expiry of time. Licence number 35/0358 dated 15 April 1835. Tye Cert of Freedom states she is wife of Robert Winter, but incorrectly states he was per “Florentia”.

Convict Changes History

Maureen Withey on 16th February, 2020 made the following changes:

alias1: Davis (alias) (prev. Davis (Alias)), gender: f

Robin Sharkey on 7th September, 2021 made the following changes:

crime

Robin Sharkey on 7th September, 2021 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1799 (prev. 0000)

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