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Hannah Hewitt

Hannah Hewitt, one of 140 convicts transported on the Numa, 03 December 1833

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Hannah Hewitt
Aliases: none
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1793
Occupation: House servant
Date of Death: 2nd November, 1870
Age: 77 years

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Shop lifting
Convicted at: Lincoln. Boston Quarter Session and Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Numa
Departure date: 3rd December, 1833
Arrival date: 13th June, 1834
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 139 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 90, Class and Piece Number HO11/9, Page Number 250
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Claudia on 31st May, 2012 wrote:

Previously, Hannah was convicted for Larceny in 1831 and imprisoned for 1 month

Hannah brought 5 children with her:-
Jane aged 9
Ann aged 9
Emma aged 6
John aged 4
Isaac aged 3

She married John THOMPSON (per "Larkins" 1817) in 1835 and then John BACON (per "Henry" 1823) in 1839

D Wong on 21st March, 2013 wrote:

Hannah was 40 years old when convicted of stealing a piece of print.  Her husband John Hewitt had arrived on the John 1832.

Hannah was 5’1” tall, able to read and write, protestant, ruddy complexion, brown/grey hair, brown eyes, pock marks on her chin, lost some of upper front teeth, scar on the back of top little finger left hand, scar on the inside top of forefinger left hand.

Assigned to Judge Dowling. Sydney.

28/8/1838: TOL Windsor.

Hannah married John Hewitt 4/12/1820, she already had 2 children, Eliza Ramsey 1815 and Henry Ramsey 1818. 

Hannah arrived with 5 of her nine children, 2 male and 3 female, and left 2 sons and 2 daughters in England.

After John died in 1834, Hannah married 3 times, John Thompson, he died on 1/7/1837, then John Bacon, and in September 1854 she married William Brown.

2/11/1870: Hannah died at Portland Head, NSW.

Denis Pember on 12th January, 2017 wrote:

The Crime and Conviction Details for Hannah are as follows:
Stamford Mercury Fri 25 Oct 1833 p.4…
Hannah the wife of John Hewitt, and Martha Wakefield were indicted for stealing, on the 2nd of October last, from the shop of Mr. Wyles, draper, a piece of printed cotton. Both were found guilty; the latter was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and by the Jury. Hewitt (in consequence of a former conviction) was ordered to be transported for seven years; Wakefield to be imprisoned to hard labour for six months. Hewitt has eight children. (9?)

Hewitt, Hannah, age 40, could read and write, Protestant, married, family of 9, born Northumberland, occupation maid allwork Rainbook House, crime shop lifting, tried at Lincoln 21 Oct 1833, 7 years, previous conviction 1 month, 5 feet 1 inch tall, ruddy complexion, dark brown hair mixed with grey, brown eyes, lost some front upper teeth, scar back of top of little finger of right hand, scar inside top of forefinger of same hand, some pock marks on chin.

Convict Changes History

Claudia on 31st May, 2012 made the following changes:

gender f

D Wong on 21st March, 2013 made the following changes:

date of birth 1793, date of death 2nd November, 1870, occupation

Denis Pember on 12th January, 2017 made the following changes:

crime

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