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John Hoyle

John Hoyle, one of 190 convicts transported on the Guildford, 22 March 1827

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Hoyle
Aliases: Red John
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1797
Occupation: Farm labourer
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 53 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Rioting
Convicted at: Lancaster Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Guildford
Departure date: 22nd March, 1827
Arrival date: 25th July, 1827
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 191 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 113 (58) Heartbreak and Hope, Deference and Defiance on the Yimmang: Tocal’s convicts 1822-1840 Brian Patrick Walsh, B Rur Sc (Hons), BA, M App Sci Ag
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

greg petersen on 6th May, 2017 wrote:

Aged 29 married with one child at time of sentencing , he was originally sentenced to death & then commuted to transportation for life to NSW for taking part in the East Lancashire Power Loom Riots on 24th - 27th April,1826.
John Hoyle is recorded as being involved in the riots only on Wednesday, 26th April 1826 at Robert Munn’s Old Clough factory near the village of Bacup. In 1824 the factory owner had invested in a steam engine and 52 power-looms to weave cotton. When the mob arrived, it’s leader went through established formality of requesting entry, which was refused. The factory door was then broken down & between 40 to 50 men and women burst into the loom room and smashed all 52 power-looms in just 35 minutes.
A witness took note of John Hoyle watching for ten minutes from ten yards away as ‘Red John’ used a piece of broken loom to smash the other looms. This witness heard someone identify him saying, ‘Look at Red John! Watch out!’ as he swung a swagger weight (a cast-iron weight used to keep tension on the warp in the loom) left and right in such a violent manner that he was a danger to the others.17
A crowd of onlookers gave three cheers as the wreckers emerged from the factory.
Soldiers arrived after and the mob had dispersed & there were no casualties although six rioters were later killed by the military during the following week.
Two weeks later, on 11th May, Hoyle was arrested and taken to the prison in Lancaster Castle along with other men and women involved in the riots. The men spent the summer of 1826 in the male felons’ prison at the Castle. At the Assizes that began on 8th August 1826 in Lancaster Castle,  Hoyle was among the 66 prisoners charged with rioting and destruction of property. The judge’s opening remarks to the prisoners gave an indication as to what was to come, saying, ‘There has been much distress but men must not take the remedy into their own hands. However misguided they might be or however pitiable their situation—it is necessary they be taught, sometimes by fatal examples, that they must not attempt to remedy their distress by acts of violence’.
Hoyle was one of 41 rioters sentenced to death but having their sentences commuted to transportation for life.
In October 1826, Hoyle was sent from Lancaster Castle to the prison hulk Dolphin at Chatham in Kent where he remained until transferred to Plymouth on 5th March 1827 prior to sailing to Australia. His record for the Dolphin carries the notation
‘convicted once before, character and connections bad’, his convict shipping indent contradicts this and states that he had no previous conviction.  In March 1827 Hoyle sailed on the Guildford arriving in Sydney in July, he was immediately assigned to Tocal. His entry in the shipping indent makes note of the red hair that brought him to the attention of witnesses during the rioting.  A NSW census the following year, in 1828, records Hoyle was employed as a shepherd at Tocal.
In 1831 he was appointed as a special police constable,  obtaining a ticket-of-leave in 1837, a conditional pardon in 1845, and possibly he died in Parramatta in 1877. There is no evidence that Hoyle applied for free passage of his wife and child to join him in the colony.

Convict Changes History

greg petersen on 6th May, 2017 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 113 (58) Heartbreak and Hope, Deference and Defiance on the Yimmang: Tocal’s convicts 1822-1840 Brian Patrick Walsh, B Rur Sc (Hons), BA, M App Sci Ag

greg petersen on 6th May, 2017 made the following changes:

crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au