Hi Guest!
Contribute to this record

James Jenkins

James Jenkins, one of 272 convicts transported on the Perseus and Coromandel, January 1802

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: James Jenkins
Aliases: none
Gender: -

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: -
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: -
Convicted at: Wilts. Assizes
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Perseus and Coromandel
Departure date: January, 1802
Arrival date: 14th August, 1802
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 251 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 312
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

Did you find the person you were looking for?

If James Jenkins was the person you were looking for, you may be able to discover more about them by looking at our resources page.

If you have more hunting to do, try a new search or browse the convict records.

Know more about James Jenkins?

Contribute to this record

Community Contributions

Anonymous on 3rd June, 2012 wrote:

he may have started a mine at long reef

Maureen Withey on 25th April, 2019 wrote:

D Wong on 7th March, 2014 wrote:

William and his brother James were convicted of stealing four ewe sheep, value ten pounds, and three wether sheep, value nine pounds, the property of Edward Smith, at Parish of Cricklade in northern Wiltshire.  The brothers spent over four years of their seven year sentences imprisioned on the Hulk “Fortunee”, anchored in Langstone Harbour near Portsmith.

Colonial Secretary:
JENKINS, James. Per “Coromandel”, 1802
1823 Oct 20: Of North Harbour. Memorial (Fiche 3066; 4/1835A No.160 p.51). Reply, 6 Dec (Reel 6011; 4/3509 p.661)
1824 Apr 24:Of Broken Bay. Reported to be repeatedly impounding stock of Dennis Sheehan (Reel 6061; 4/1779 p.35)
1824 Jul 14:Memorial (Fiche 3095; 4/1838A No.509 pp.49-56). Reply, 17 Aug (Reel 6013; 4/3512 p.213)
1824 Oct 2; 1825 Aug 5: Of North Harbour. Memorial of servant Robert Tiffen for land (Fiche 3113; 4/1839B No.983 pp.1213-22)

On completion of their sentences the Jenkins brothers soon entered into the commercial life of Sydney, as farmers, boat builders and property developers
Unfortunately the brother’s commercial partnership was cut short when William Jenkins was shot and killed when he went to the aid of the keeper of the Parramatta Toll Gate who was being attacked by armed robbers, on 28th May 1814.  William’s widow, formerly Sarah Chivers, was pregnant with their third child at the time of his death.  James continued to support his late brother’s family until Sarah’s remarriage in 1821.

19/11/1807: Married Sarah Chivers (Elizabeth 1806, came free) - 3 children.

SHOCKING MURDER.—Early on Sunday morning last an account was received in Town of the murder of Mr. William Jenkins, a dealer of Sydney, and Mr. Rowland Edwards, a settler of Hawkesbury, who were both shot at the Parramatta Toll-gate (kept by Edward Mayne), between ten and eleven the preceding night; of which melancholy fact the following are the particulars:—Mr. Jenkins, coming towards Sydney,  and Mr. Edwards, proceeding for Hawkesbury,  met at the Toll-house, and not inclining to pursue their different journeys further, received the proffer of such accommodation as the place afforded. 
At an early hour they went to bed, as likewise did their host; who being some time afterwards disturbed by a voice requiring that the toll-gate should be opened, arose and went out to obey the summons; but on opening the door saw two men armed with muskets, ready to burst into the house, one of them much taller than the other, and both wearing handkerchiefs over their faces. Edwards and Jenkins were coming to his assistance when the taller ruffian, levelling his musket at the foremost, who happened to be Edwards, fired, & both fell on the ex-plosion.—Jenkins was killed on the spot, and the unhappy partner in his destiny survived four painful hours—then followed him to the shades of death. The assassins were two labourers employed in the construction of the Liverpool road, who inhabited huts about two and a quarter miles from Parramatta, their names Michael Woollaghan, and Alexander Suitar.  -A Verdict of Wilful Murder was returned by the Jury against Woollaghan and Suitar, who were accordingly fully committed by the Coroner for trial.

Thomas Woolley on the Admiral Gambier 1811, was a witness, and said that Suitar had been on the ship with him and that his name was Scott.  There was a William Scott on the Admiral Gambier, so Suitar may have been his alias.

Phil Hands on 7th March, 2017 wrote:

Tried and convicted in Wiltshire in 1797 with his brother James for the theft of 7 sheep valued at 19 Pounds, both being sentenced to death, but this was later commuted to 7 years transportation.
Left England on 12th Febraury 1802.
Ship:- the ‘Coromandel’ sailed with 138 male convicts on board of which 1 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 13th June 1802.
William died on 28th May 1814 when he went to the aid of the Gate Keeper at the Parramatta Turnpike who was being attacked by armed robbers and was shot dead, he was 38 years old.
William’s brother, James, continued to look after his brothers wife, who was pregnant at the time, until she re-married in 1821.

William Jenkins was born c1776 in County Wiltshire England. His brother, James Jenkins was about 23 when they were convicted of stealing four ewe sheep, value ten pounds, and three wether sheep, value nine pounds, the property of Edward Smith, at Parish of Cricklade in northern Wiltshire. They appeared at the Wiltshire Assizes, Salisbury, on 11th March 1797. The original death sentences were commuted to transportation to the Colony of New South Wales for seven years. The brothers spent over four years of their seven year sentences imprisoned on the Hulk Fortunee, anchored in Langstone Harbour near Portsmith, before embarking on the convict transport, Coromandel, bound for New South Wales. The Coromandel sailed from Portsmouth on 12th February 1802 and arrived at Port Jackson four months later, on 13th June. The story goes that their father and a friend of the father were all convicted of the crime and that the older men were hanged but there is no firm evidence of it. The father might not have been involved at all.

On completion of their sentences the Jenkins brothers soon entered into the commercial life of Sydney, as farmers, boat builders and property developers. James Jenkins described himself as a stonemason, probably a trade he learnt while working on construction sites around Portsmouth during his years on the Fortunee.

Unfortunately the brother’s commercial partnership was cut short when William Jenkins was shot and killed when he went to the aid of the keeper of the Parramatta Toll Gate who was being attacked by armed robbers, on 28th May 1814. William was murdered 3 weeks after the launching of the vessel the John Palmer. William’s widow, formerly Sarah Chivers, was pregnant with their third child at the time of his death. James continued to support his late brother’s family until Sarah’s remarriage in 1821, and by then, he had married Elizabeth Saunders.
At the time of his death James Jenkins had extensive property interests in and around Sydney, including 1310 acres in the Dee Why - Collaroy - Long Reef area of Sydney’s northern beaches. His daughter left their land to Salvation Army.

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au