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John Johnson

John Johnson, one of 200 convicts transported on the York, 03 September 1830

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Johnson
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1816
Occupation: -
Date of Death: 1892
Age: 76 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 58 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Theft~simple larceny
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: York
Departure date: 3rd September, 1830
Arrival date: 7th February, 1831
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 199 other convicts

References

Primary source: NSW Australia Certificates of freedom Ancestry Convict Indents.
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Angela on 4th January, 2020 wrote:

Born in Bristol
Prisoner’s number31/83
Date of trial 19th Feb ,1829
Certificate of freedom 38/1120
Dated 27 Dec 1838
Buried St Bartholomew’s Church,Prospect NSW

Maureen Withey on 5th January, 2020 wrote:

Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 05 January 2020), February 1829, trial of JOHN JOHNSON JOSEPH JONES (t18290219-137).
JOHN JOHNSON, JOSEPH JONES, Theft > simple larceny, 19th February 1829.

663. JOHN JOHNSON and JOSEPH JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February , 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 habit-shirt, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 6d.; 2 pieces of dimity, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 2 gloves, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 pelisse, value 6s.; 2 gowns, value 6s.; 1 cloak, value 6s.; 2 aprons, value 4s.; I cap, value 1s.; 1 pair of pockets, value 6d., and 1 pocket-book, value 1s. , the goods of John Gransden .

JOHN GRANSDEN . I am an officer in the Navy , and live at Deptford. On the 9th of February we were going from London in a light cart, and had a trunk with us, containing all the things here enumerated; I put the trunk into the cart; I did not miss it till I got to my own house, which was in about an hour; we set off about five o’clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN . I am the prosecutor’s wife - I packed up the trunk - some of the articles are here, and I can swear to them; they are my husband’s, and had belonged to my late mother - I was in the cart, but did not miss the trunk out of it.

JOSEPH PALMER . I live with my father at Walworth. On Monday week last I was at my father’s till about one o’clock in the day - I afterwards went to the Bricklayers’ Arms - I saw the two prisoners there, whom I knew, and I joined them; we saw a cart, which belonged to John Chapple , of Deptford, going down the Bermondsey New-road ; I knew Charles Sims , the driver, and spoke to him: the prisoners were with me; Jones said it was a good speck if I would like to go; Johnson was present; we followed the cart, and Johnson cut the cord which had tired this box on the tail-board - I lifted the box off just beyond the St. Helena turnpike , and set it down in the road - Jones was just behind me, and Johnson just behind him I believe; I am sure he was present; Jones picked the box up, andset it down in a ditch to conceal it; in a short time I came up and got it out - Johnson was not present then - but after Jones and I had carried it a short distance we saw him, and gave him the box; he carried it about half the distance from there to the Docks, and then Jones and I carried it; we took it down into some mud at the back of the canal-bridge and took out these articles, which we put about the waistbands of our breeches, and in different parts; Jones said we were to take them to Lewis’, in Rosemary-lane - we all went there; Jones went into Lewis’ house -Lewis’ boy then came and called me in; I took the things off my person and left them there; Lewis was present - it was in a back room adjoining the shop; I then went out and sent Johnson in; they were there a long time; Lewis’ boy came and beckoned me in again, and Johnson came out- Lewis said they were worth nothing to him, they did not suit him, he had no call in the country for such things as these - they were almost all female appared; we packed the things about our persons again; either Lewis or his boy called Johnson in again, and he packed some things about his person and some in a bag; Lewis then went to the door, and said the officers were looking about - they were larafied, or some such word; he said the officers were gone, and we had better make the best of our way up Lion-street; Johnson went out first, I went next, and Jones a little time after; Lewis said we had better go out together; Jones said to Lewis, “Are the things not worth any thing?” and said they came a long way from there.

Prisoner JONES. He came to us, and said he knew the boy belonging to the cart; and he knew he could steal the things from the cart if I would go with him. Witness. No such thing.

THOMAS FOGG . I am an officer. On Monday week I saw the prisoners coming out of Lewis’ shop in Rosemary-lane; I stopped Jones and Johnson, Till stopped Palmer; I found in a bag on Johnson some of these things - my brother searched Jones; I was going by, and Lewis said he had three chaps in there with something that was not right.

JAMES FOGG . I was in the lane at the time; I searched Jones, and found some of these articles on him, inside his waistcoat and trousers, and some in his cap; I afterwards found a pair of gloves in Palmer’s pocket; they said they had found the things in a field just beyond Whitechapel turnpike; Palmer said he knew where, but it was best known to himself; Lewis told us he thought they came from over the water.

JAMES TILL . I searched Palmer, and found a silk cloak, two aprons, and some other articles marked R. B.; this was about eight o’clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN . These things are my husband’s; the letters R. B. are my mother’s initials.

Johnson put in a written defence, stating that Palmer had induced him to commit the robbery, and threatened to injure him if he did not cut the string of the box.

JOHNSON - GUILTY . Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY . Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

D Wong on 5th January, 2020 wrote:

*** 2 John Johnson’s on this voyage ***

John Johnson No.2. was tried at Cumberland QS.

Old Bailey:
JOHN JOHNSON, JOSEPH JONES.
Theft: simple larceny.
19th February 1829
Verdict Guilty; Guilty
Sentence Transportation

JOHN JOHNSON and JOSEPH JONES were indicted for stealing, on the 9th of February, 1 petticoat, value 2s.; 2 pillow-cases, value 2s.; 1 habit-shirt, value 6d.; 2 stockings, value 6d.; 2 pieces of dimity, value 6d.; 1 handkerchief, value 6d.; 1 napkin, value 1s.; 2 gloves, value 6d.; 1 sheet, value 2s.; 1 pelisse, value 6s.; 2 gowns, value 6s.; 1 cloak, value 6s.; 2 aprons, value 4s.; I cap, value 1s.; 1 pair of pockets, value 6d., and 1 pocket-book, value 1s., the goods of John Gransden.

JOHN GRANSDEN I am an officer in the Navy, and live at Deptford. On the 9th of February we were going from London in a light cart, and had a trunk with us, containing all the things here enumerated; I put the trunk into the cart; I did not miss it till I got to my own house, which was in about an hour; we set off about five o’clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN. I am the prosecutor’s wife - I packed up the trunk - some of the articles are here, and I can swear to them; they are my husband’s, and had belonged to my late mother - I was in the cart, but did not miss the trunk out of it.

JOSEPH PALMER. I live with my father at Walworth. On Monday week last I was at my father’s till about one o’clock in the day - I afterwards went to the Bricklayers’ Arms - I saw the two prisoners there, whom I knew, and I joined them; we saw a cart, which belonged to John Chapple, of Deptford, going down the Bermondsey New-road ; I knew Charles Sims , the driver, and spoke to him: the prisoners were with me; Jones said it was a good speck if I would like to go; Johnson was present; we followed the cart, and Johnson cut the cord which had tired this box on the tail-board - I lifted the box off just beyond the St. Helena turnpike, and set it down in the road - Jones was just behind me, and Johnson just behind him I believe; I am sure he was present; Jones picked the box up, and set it down in a ditch to conceal it; in a short time I came up and got it out - Johnson was not present then - but after Jones and I had carried it a short distance we saw him, and gave him the box; he carried it about half the distance from there to the Docks, and then Jones and I carried it; we took it down into some mud at the back of the canal-bridge and took out these articles, which we put about the waistbands of our breeches, and in different parts; Jones said we were to take them to Lewis’, in Rosemary-lane - we all went there; Jones went into Lewis’ house -Lewis’ boy then came and called me in; I took the things off my person and left them there; Lewis was present - it was in a back room adjoining the shop; I then went out and sent Johnson in; they were there a long time; Lewis’ boy came and beckoned me in again, and Johnson came out- Lewis said they were worth nothing to him, they did not suit him, he had no call in the country for such things as these - they were almost all female appared; we packed the things about our persons again; either Lewis or his boy called Johnson in again, and he packed some things about his person and some in a bag; Lewis then went to the door, and said the officers were looking about - they were larafied, or some such word; he said the officers were gone, and we had better make the best of our way up Lion-street; Johnson went out first, I went next, and Jones a little time after; Lewis said we had better go out together; Jones said to Lewis, “Are the things not worth any thing?” and said they came a long way from there.
Prisoner JONES. He came to us, and said he knew the boy belonging to the cart; and he knew he could steal the things from the cart if I would go with him. Witness. No such thing.

THOMAS FOGG I am an officer. On Monday week I saw the prisoners coming out of Lewis’ shop in Rosemary-lane; I stopped Jones and Johnson, Till stopped Palmer; I found in a bag on Johnson some of these things - my brother searched Jones; I was going by, and Lewis said he had three chaps in there with something that was not right.

JAMES FOGG. I was in the lane at the time; I searched Jones, and found some of these articles on him, inside his waistcoat and trousers, and some in his cap; I afterwards found a pair of gloves in Palmer’s pocket; they said they had found the things in a field just beyond Whitechapel turnpike; Palmer said he knew where, but it was best known to himself; Lewis told us he thought they came from over the water.

JAMES TILL. I searched Palmer, and found a silk cloak, two aprons, and some other articles marked R. B.; this was about eight o’clock in the evening.

JANE ANN GRANSDEN. These things are my husband’s; the letters R. B. are my mother’s initials.

Johnson put in a written defence, stating that Palmer had induced him to commit the robbery, and threatened to injure him if he did not cut the string of the box.

JOHNSON - GUILTY. Aged 13.

JONES - GUILTY. Aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years.

Joseph Jones arrived NSW per ‘Florentia’ 1830.

John Johnson was listed as 16 years old on arrival.

Native Place: Bristol.

Occupation: Knife boy.

John was literate, protestant, single, 4’8ΒΌ” tall, ruddy fair complexion, light brown hair, hazel eyes.

Assigned to John Bellamy, Pennant Hills.

Return of Convicts of the York assigned between 1st January 1832 and 31st March 1832 (Sydney Gazette 14 June 1832; 21 June 1832; 28 June 1832; 5 July 1832):
John Johnston - Knife boy assigned to J.H. Hart in Sydney.

????: TOL Dural.

Convict Changes History

Angela on 4th January, 2020 made the following changes:

source: NSW Australia Certificates of freedom (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/7, Page Number 485 (245)), date of birth: 1816 (prev. 0000), date of death: 1892 (prev. 0000), gender: m, crime

D Wong on 5th January, 2020 made the following changes:

source: NSW Australia Certificates of freedom Ancestry Convict Indents. (prev. NSW Australia Certificates of freedom), crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au