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Mary Long

Mary Long, one of 61 convicts transported on the Janus, 23 October 1819

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Mary Long
Aliases: none
Gender: -

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: -
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Median life span was 57 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: -
Convicted at: Lancaster Liverpool Boro Quarter Session
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Janus
Departure date: 23rd October, 1819
Arrival date: 3rd May, 1820
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 105 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/3, Page Number 241 (122)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Maureen Withey on 12th May, 2019 wrote:

19 July, 1820. Proceedings of Bench of Magistrates re. prostitution on ship Janus.

The Special Bench of Magistrates having re-assembled according to adjournment, this 24th day of June, 1820.

Present: The Honble.the Judge Advocate: William Minchin,Esquire,J.P.; Simeon Lord, Esquire,J. P.; John Piper,Esquire,J.P.

Mary Long, being duly Sworn, states. I was one of the female Convicts that came out in the Ship “Janus.” I was in the first instance placed in the Prison Room; it was locked down about dark. The locking down took place, as soon as the Ship sailed from Cork; we were unlocked about Daylight; the Women were not mustered after we sailed. I can’t say that some of the Prisoners were on Deck or somewhere else after the Lock down time. I can’t say I know of any Prisoner being let out of the Prison after the Lock down hour. When I have not been Confined in the Prison during the night, I have passed my time in the Captain’s Cabin. I believe I am at this time in a pregnant Condition. I charge Captain Mowat with the Cause of my being in this Condition. During the Voyage I did not frequently pass the night in the Captain’s Cabin. I know of Lydia Elsden having passed the nights in another Cabin, the next Cabin to the Captain’s, the Chief Mate’s, Mr. Hedges. I do not know of any of the Women being down in the Sailors’ Birth. I believe they were. I do not know of their being in other places
than the Prison Room; it was days and nights; as far as I know and saw, the Women were treated very well; they had no Complaints. I have heard the Surgeon Sup’d't complain of the Disorderly Conduct of the Prisoners. I have heard him say, as to the Women being with the men, to keep it from the Priests; that he
knew what he was doing.

When I was in the Captain’s Cabin, it was Commonly known. When I went, I went publicly down night or day. I washed and mended for Captain Mowat. I constantly had occasion to go down for those purposes. Mary Hoare, Isabella Irvin used to wash for the Priests; Ellen Molloy cooked for them; they had frequent
occasion to go into the Priests’ Cabin.

Sworn before us this 24th day of June, 1820.
Jno. Wylde, J.-A.
Wm. Minchin, J.P.

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au