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Sarah Lyons

Sarah Lyons, one of 151 convicts transported on the Lady Juliana, June 1789

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Sarah Lyons
Aliases: Moses
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1763
Occupation: Unknown
Date of Death: 27th July, 1837
Age: 74 years

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Stealing
Convicted at: Old Bailey
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Lady Juliana
Departure date: June, 1789
Arrival date: 3rd June, 1790
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 246 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 16
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

jackson on 28th April, 2016 wrote:

She married William Tonge

D Wong on 28th April, 2016 wrote:

Old Bailey:
SARAH LYONS, Theft > grand larceny, 25th June 1788.
SARAH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th day of May, one piece of silk, for handkerchiefs, containing in length seven yards, value 20 s. the goods of William Jones, John Jones, William Albion Jones, and John Walford.

PRISONER’s DEFENCE.
I never touched any thing but the binding; and I looked at the handkerchiefs and bought three, and left a deposit for them; I was very willing to be searched, as I knew I was innocent.
GUILTY.

Sarah Lyons was about 25 years old when convicted – birth dates of 1763 and 1769 are listed.

1/8/1790: 150 female convicts from the ‘Lady Juliana’ sailed for Norfolk Island on the ‘Surprize’.

Sarah met William Tunks, who was a private marine with the 26th (Portsmouth) Company, who arrived aboard the ship ‘Sirius”.  William was one of 29 ex-Marines who sailed for Norfolk Island on board “Atlantic” on 28/10/1791.  He was granted 60 acres of land and supplied with livestock, rations, tools and building materials.

William stayed on Norfolk Island for nearly two years – met Sarah and had daughter Ann, born in 1792.
No marriage record or the birth of their daughter has been found.

They returned to Sydney per ‘Kitty’ 7/3/1793.  William enlisted in the 102nd Regiment of Foot and remained a soldier until the regiment was disbanded in 1810.

They had 2 more children, John b1795 and Charles b1802.

William died in 1821 and Sarah worked as housekeeper for Jacob Isaacs, a business man. Later she lived with her son, John, at Norfolk House, Parramatta.

27/7/1837: Sarah died aged 74 years and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta.

Phil Hands on 4th April, 2017 wrote:

In May 1788 Sarah, aged about 25, went shopping for silk handkerchiefs at a haberdashery shop in London. After discussing her needs with a salesman she bought and paid for some items and ordered others. As she walked from the shop a piece of silk material she had concealed under her skirts fell to the floor and was noticed by the manager. The police were called and Sarah was arrested, she was tried and convicted at the Old Bailey on 25th June 1788, for the theft of 7 yards of silk value 20 shillings, sentenced to 7 years transportation, she was sent to the nortorious Newgate Prison to await transportation.
Left England on 29th July 1789.
Ship:- the ‘Lady Juliana’ sailed with 256 female convicts on board of which 5 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 3rd June 1790.

On 1st August 1790 ‘Surprize’ carrying 150 of the female convicts from ‘Lady Juliana’ sailed for Norfolk Island. Sarah was therefore at Norfolk Island when soldier William Tunks arrived there in November 1791.
Sarah and William became lovers on Norfolk Island and a daughter Ann was born of their union. No record can be found of a marriage between William and Sarah, nor of the birth of their daughter. However there is documentation of Sarah, William Tunks and their daughter Ann leaving Norfolk Island for Port Jackson on 7th March 1793, for an undisclosed reason, William and Sarah and baby Ann left Norfolk Island on board “Kitty” to return to Sydney. On arrival there William enlisted in the 102nd. Regiment of Foot (NSW Corps) and remained a private soldier until the regiment was disbanded in 1810.

After William’s death on 6th August 1821at Parramatta, Sarah apparently worked as housekeeper for Jacob Isaacs, a business man. Later she lived with her son, John, at Norfolk House, Parramatta.
Sarah died on 27th July 1837 aged 74 years and was buried in St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta.

Old Bailey Trial transcript.
Reference Number: t17880625-4

406. SARAH LYONS was indicted for stealing, on the 26th day of May , one piece of silk, for handkerchiefs, containing in length seven yards, value 20 s. the goods of William Jones , John Jones , William Albion Jones , and John Walford .
JOHN WALFORD sworn.
I am a haberdasher , and one of the partners mentioned in the indictment; on Monday the 26th of May, I was informed by one of our servants that some goods were lying on the ground; the prisoner was in the shop, and the shopmen had some suspicion of her, which they communicated to me; I desired that they would not touch her, unless they were positive, as it was a delicate matter, and in fact would be cruel to take her into custody on flight suspicions; after which the shopmen were quite positive; and on her going out, one of the young men stopped her and brought her back, and she was searched, and a piece of silk for handkerchiefs fell from under her petticoats; which is the goods mentioned in the indictment; I am positive it fell from her, as I saw it before it touched the ground.
WILLIAM STORER sworn.
I am a shopman to the persons mentioned in the indictment; on the 26th of May, the prisoner came in to purchase some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed her some which she did not approve of; upon which I went with her into a back warehouse and shewed her some others; she chose one, and deposited a shilling by way of earnest for it; I shewed her some others of which she chose two and deposited two shillings; after which we had some conversation about the price; she had not paid the full; nor had she them delivered to her; she was to send her sister the next day for them with the remainder of the money, who she described to be a short black girl; I then sold her several yards of binding; then she went out of the warehouse into the shop; Mr. Walford was at the door; when she had got about ten yards into the shop from the warehouse, she let fall a piece of silk handkerchiefs; I was about two yards from her; Mr. Walford said, this is what we want; we will make an example of her; I then returned her the three shillings she had deposited; the constable was sent for, and she was taken into custody.
JOHN BUTLER sworn.
I am a shopman to the prosecutors; while Storer was conversing with the prisoner, I saw a piece of silk handkerchiefs lying on the ground; I thought it looked suspicious, and I mentioned it to Mr. Walford, who told me, not to accuse her unless I was positive, and to be very cautious
about matters of that kind; after which both me and Mr. Walford saw another piece drop; she had her hands in her pockets, and seemed uneasy; on her going out I brought her back, and then she dropt the piece mentioned in the indictment.
WILLIAM HAWKINS sworn.
I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; and the goods were delivered to me by Storer.
(The goods produced and shop mark sworn to.)
PRISONER’s DEFENCE.
I never touched any thing but the binding; and I looked at the handkerchiefs and bought three, and left a deposit for them; I was very willing to be searched, as I knew I was innocent.
GUILTY .
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice WILSON.

Convict Changes History

jackson on 28th April, 2016 made the following changes:

alias1: Moses, gender: m, crime

D Wong on 28th April, 2016 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1763 (prev. 0000), date of death: 27th July, 1837 (prev. 0000), gender: f (prev. m), occupation

Phil Hands on 4th April, 2017 made the following changes:

convicted at

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