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John Mcnannie

John McNannie, one of 146 convicts transported on the Andromeda, 16 October 1826

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Mcnannie
Aliases: Mackie (alias)
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1796
Occupation: Soldier
Date of Death: 16th April, 1834
Age: 38 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 53 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 14 years

Crime: House breaking
Convicted at: Stirling Court of Justiciary
Sentence term: 14 years
Ship: Andromeda
Departure date: 16th October, 1826
Arrival date: 23rd February, 1827
Place of arrival Van Diemen's Land
Passenger manifest Travelled with 146 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 107 (55) PRO, HO 17/9/53 Petition of John McNannie, AOT Con 31/29 p.47, MM 33/1, 139 John McNannie per Andromeda (vessel) 23/2/1827. Manton, John Allen. The Isle of the Dead; or The Burial-Place at Port Arthur, Van-Diemen's Land. London : John Mason, Missionary Series No. 652, (1845?). https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/43756809
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Jo K on 19th April, 2018 wrote:

John McNannie was only thirteen (13) years old when he enlisted in the 71st Glasgow Highland regiment under general Francis Dundas, the same Scottish regiment his father had served in. He was a seven-year military veteran with multiple tours to the Peninsular (Portugal) with a commendable record by the time he marched to the Battle of Waterloo in June 1815 wearing the Macleod tartan. He was still only 19 years old, six foot tall and an esteemed member (see Manton) of his regiment.
After Napoleon’s defeat, he lost his left arm - amputated below the elbow. He was rendered physically unfit for further active service and discharged from the military having achieved the highest rank possible for a non-commissioned officer (according to Manton – have not found service records to confirm). He had a pension from the army to sustain him. [ PRO, HO 17/9/53 ]
When he married, he set out to improve his circumstances and became landlord in an ‘alehouse’ where the joys of playing, singing and drinking that he had adopted in the army could be indulged. Allegedly (according to Manton) he developed a habit of receiving stolen property, which is what brought him here to Maria, but his court report (He was tried at Stirling Court Of Justiciary) in the newspapers are clear that he broke into a house and stole from it with a friend and was tried for ‘Housebreaking’.
He was sentenced to 14 years, and his appeal unsuccessful. He had no living children (or admitted to none).
He spent four and a half (4.5) years on Maria Island allocated to ‘Public Works’ and employed as an overseer at the station.
His accommodations were the Prisoners’ Barracks, from which he was twice found absent. No leniency was shown on the second occurrence, with a two-month chain gang sentence for his troubles. For a misdemeanor he was relocated to Port Arthur, where “in his best days he was not happy,” (Manton) and where he was eventually hospitalized with pulmonary consumption - his body wearing the scars of lashings from army and convict life.

“On the Isle of the Dead no stone marks whereabouts he slumbers…” 10.

PRO, HO 17/9/53 Petition of John McNannie, AOT Con 31/29 p.47, MM 33/1, 139 John McNannie per Andromeda (vessel) 23/2/1827.

Manton, John Allen. The Isle of the Dead; or The Burial-Place at Port Arthur, Van-Diemen’s Land. London : John Mason, Missionary Series No. 652, (1845?). https://trove.nla.gov.au/version/43756809

Maureen Withey on 15th February, 2021 wrote:

National Archives.

HO 17/54/461829 Oct 1

Prisoner name: John Macnannie.

Prisoner occupation: Formerly a Private in 71st Regiment of Foot.

Court and date of trial: Stirling Circuit Court April 1826.

Crime: Theft.

Initial sentence: 14 years transportation.

Annotated: Nil.

Petitioner(s): Elizabeth Dickson alias Widow Macnannie (the prisoner’s mother) of ‘Rough hill’ near Glasgow, with a minister and an elder of the parish of Glasgow.

Grounds for clemency: Irreproachable character; severely wounded on active service; fell into bad company who plied him with liquor and persuaded him into the crime; his conduct ‘gives satisfaction’ in Van Diemen’s Land.

Additional Information: The prisoner was sent to Van Diemen’s Land. Convict was an out-pensioner from the Royal Hospital, Chelsea at the rate of 1/- per day following severe wounds in the Peninsular Wars and the loss of an arm at the Battle of Waterloo.

Convict Changes History

Jo K on 19th April, 2018 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 107 (55) PRO, HO 17/9/53 Petition of John McNannie, AOT Con 31/29 p.47, MM 33/1, 139 John McNannie per Andromeda (vessel) 23/2/1827. Manton, John A

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au