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John Mills

John Mills, one of 170 convicts transported on the Lord Melville, 14 November 1828

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Mills
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1807
Occupation: Gardener
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 51 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Pickpocket
Convicted at: Sussex Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Lord Melville
Departure date: 14th November, 1828
Arrival date: 6th May, 1829
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 169 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 527 (265)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

John Mills - Trial and Transportation
JOHN MILLS was born in Hampshire in about 1807.
He was tried at the Summer Assizes at Lewes, Sussex, for larceny from a person (picking pockets). The sessions opened on Saturday 2 August 1828, were adjourned, and reconvened on Monday 4 August.
The Judges arrived here in the course of Saturday, when Mr Baron Garrow opened the commission, after which the court was adjourned until this morning. The calendar only contains 15 prisoners. In the Niri Prius court, 23 causes are entered. The Judges yesterday attended divine service at St Mathews church, where an appropriate sermon was preached by the Sheriff’s chaplain, the Rev. H Rose.
John Mills of the Brighthelmston parish was:
Committed, 2nd August 1828, by Sir David Scott, Baron. Charged on oath of William Foster with stealing at Brighton, from the said William Foster, one silk handkerchief, value two shillings, the property of said William Foster.
John Mills was found guilty and sentenced to be hanged. He was one of only three of the 15 prisoners on whom the death sentence was passed. It appears that in each case the sentence was commuted to transportation for life because John Fenns, also sentenced to hang at this session, arrives in Australia on the same ship as John Mills also showing his sentence as transportation for life. [Sentences at this session of the Assizes tend to show much more severe sentences for theft directly from a person compared to theft from a property.]
On 30 August 1828, Robert Peel, as Home Secretary, ordered the removal of 12 prisoners, including John Mills from the Sussex prison to the hulk York in Portsmouth harbour. In the quarterly return of convicts to 30 September 1828, Alexander Lamb, overseer of the York, described John Mills as healthy and having been of good behaviour - but the same was said of every convict held on the hulk.
On October 16, the new Home Secretary, M Phillips, ordered 80 male convicts from the York, and 90 male convicts from the Leviathan were removed to the Lord Melville for transportation to New South Wales. John Mills was moved to the Lord Melville on Monday 10 November 1828.
On 14 November, letters were issued indicating that all bonds and contracts for the 170 convicts had been completed and the Commissioners of the Navy were advised, “It will not be necessary to detain that vessel any longer on account of this office”
Despite this, the Lord Melville did not sail until 5 January 1829, and arrived in Sydney on 6 May 1829, under Master Brown with G S Rutherford as surgeon. The convicts were held on board until a muster was held on 8 May. 170 male convicts were mustered being the original number embarked.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Source Citation
State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12188; Item: [4/4014]; Microfiche: 672
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.
Original data:
New South Wales Government. Indents First Fleet, Second Fleet and Ships. NRS 1150, microfiche 620–624. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. List of Convicts: Minerva, Speedy, Royal Admiral, Minorca, Canada, Nile. NRW 1151, microfiche 625. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Bound manuscript indents, 1788–1842. NRS 12188, microfiche 614–619,626–657, 660–695. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Annotated printed indents (i.e., office copies). NRS 12189, microfiche 696–730, 732–744. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
©

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Source Citation
State Archives NSW
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.
Original data:
New South Wales Government. Copies of returns of Absolute and Conditional Pardons granted. Series 1165. State Records Reel 774, copy of 4/4492. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of Conditional Pardons. Series 1170. State Records Reel 774. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Register of convicts recommended for Conditional Pardons. Series 1173. State Records Reel 797-798, copy of 4/4478-80. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Alphabetical registers of pardons. Series 1174. State Records Reel 798, copy of 6/884. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of Absolute Pardons. Series 1177. State Records Reel 800, copy of 4/4486-88. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Registers of recommendations for Absolute Pardons. Series 1179. State Records Reel 800, copy of 4/4489-90. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.
New South Wales Government. Copies of Conditional Pardons Registered. Series 1172. Reels 775-796, 3037. State Records Authority of New South Wales, Kingswood, New South Wales, Australia.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 29
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales, Australia, Settler and Convict Lists, 1787-1834 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 1-4, 6-18, 28-30); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

John Mills - Pardon and Marriage
John Mills was convict number 148. He was now 22 years of age, 5’3” tall, of ruddy complexion, with light brown hair and grey eyes. He was assigned to John Gaggin at Windsor. John Gaggin was the son-in-law of a John Brabyn. Brabyn was a former military officer who owned 1,100 acres in the area (300 of which was cleared and 82 acres cultivated). He had built a large home on the property, “Clifton”, but moved in 1829 and allowed his daughter and son-in-law to move in and-run the property. “Clifton” was sold in 1833 to the Rev. Joseph Ducker.
With this sale, John Mills may have been, reassigned because in the 1837 convict muster, he is shown to be with a Charles Marsden at Penrith.
It was the Penrith Magistrates Bench, which granted him a Ticket-of-leave in February 1838, which required him to remain in the Windsor district.
Eight years later, on 1 July 1846, he was granted a Second Class Conditional Pardon. The condition was that he could not, during the continuance of the term of his said Sentence of Transportation, go to, or be elsewhere than, in the said Australian Colonies and New Zealand.
However, it appears that John Mills remained in the Windsor area; on 20 December 1849, he married Eliza McBride a native of County Antrim, Ireland, in St Mathews Church of England at Windsor. Henry T Stiles was the Minister and the witnesses, William Trussle and Hannah Hennaghan of South Creek, near Windsor. The bride and groom and both witnesses, each made their mark. South Creek was the area near Windsor in which those with Tickets-of-Leave and emancipated convicts appear to have gathered.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Source Citation for Marriage to Eliza McBride 1849
Source Information
Ancestry.com. Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Original data: Compiled from publicly available sources.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

John and Eliza’s Children
John and Eliza’s first child, Elizabeth Green, was born on 3 August the following year at South Creek, and baptised on 22 September in the church in which they had married by Henry Stiles.  A second child, Rachel, was not born until 4 February, 1855. She was baptised on 4 March in the same church. The third child, yet another daughter, Olive Mary Catherine was born on 10 February 1858 at South Creek.
John and Eliza then took their young family to Cobbora, on the Talbragar River near Dunedoo. They were in Cobbora by mid-1861. John received a grant of a ½-acre town block but it is not clear whether this occurred before or after the move. The historical records suggest the survey for the division of town blocks did not take place until 1863. John Mills either selected Cobbora before the land was available or already been told he would receive the land subject to the completion of the survey.
The next child, Sarah Martha was born in Cobbora on 27 June, 1861. Isabella Wilson witnessed the birth. John Hunt registered the birth in Dubbo on 16 August. He was the schoolteacher at Cobbora. Interestingly, the Registrar was Frederick Pottinger, the police Captain who almost a year later, on 24 April, 1862, arrested Ben Hall for a crime he did not commit. This wrongful arrest subsequently led to Ben Hall becoming a bushranger. A fifth daughter, Isabella Ann followed on 13 May, 1864.
On 23 February 1867, John and Eliza Mills finally had a son whom they named Arthur.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Birth of a Second Son when John was 62
In addition, a second son. Jeremiah Archie, was born on 27 May, 1869. Jeremiah was the last of their children. John was already 62 years of age.

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Source information for birth.
Ancestry members family trees

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

The Voyage of Convict Ship Lord Melville 1829
Embarked: 170 men

Voyage: 121 days

Deaths

Surgeon’s Journal: No

Previous vessel: Edward arrived 26 April 1829

Next vessel: Princess Royal arrived 9 May 1829

Master Robert Brown

Surgeon Superintendent George Shaw Rutherford

The Lord Melville was built in Quebec in 1825. She transported convicts to Australia in 1829 and 1830.

The convicts of the Lord Melville came from counties throughout England including York, Northampton, Hertford, Cambridge, Surry, Lancaster.

Anthony Hitchcock, James and Isaac Cooper William Marsfield, Thomas Hutton, Samuel Ryan, Thomas Chapple, James Archer, James Jack, were all tried at Chelmsford on 10th March 1828. On 23rd May they were taken from Chelmsford to the Leviathan hulk which, between January and June 1829, held an average of 655 convicts.(1)  The Chelmsford prisoners were held on the Leviathan with many others until 10th November when they were embarked on the Lord Melville bound for New South Wales.

The Lord Melville was the next vessel to leave England for New South Wales after the departure of the Mellish. The Lord Melville departed London 5 January 1829 .

The Lord Melville arrived in Port Jackson on 6 May 1829 and convicts were mustered on board by Colonial Secretary Alexander Macleay on 8th May 1829. The Indents give details such as name, age, education, marital status, family, religion, native place, trade or employment, offence, where and when tried, prior convictions, sentence, physical description and where and to whom assigned. There are also occasional notes giving details of date and place of death, colonial sentences and tickets of leave.

Notes & Links:

1). George Shaw Rutherford was also employed as surgeon on the convict ships Marquis of Hastings in 1826, Prince of Orange in 1821,  Shipley in 1822,  Eliza in 1827,  Royal Admiral in 1830 and the China in 1846 (to Norfolk Island)

He gave evidence before a Select Committee inquiry as to the best mode of secondary punishment in 1831 - Evidence of George Rutherford

2). Anthony Hitchcock a fisherman and bricklayer from Essex arrived on the Lord Melville. He was eventually assigned to James Mudie at Castle Forbes and became part of one of the most infamous episodes in Australian Colonial history. Select here to find out more about Anthony Hitchcock.

3). Bushranger Thomas Walker also arrived on the Lord Melville.

4). Hunter Valley convicts / passengers arriving on the Lord Melville in 1829

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 wrote:

Details for the ship Lord Melville II (1) (1829)
Ship Name: Lord Melville II (1) 
Rig Type: S.
Built: Quebec
Build Year: 1825
Size (tons): 425
Voyage Details
Master: Robert Brown
Surgeon: George S. Rutherford
Sailed: 5 January 1829
From: London
Arrived: 6 May 1829
Port: PJ
Route:
Days Travel: 121
Convicts Landed: 170 males & 0 female convicts
Notes:

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 wrote:

John Mills Appearance
Complexion:  Ruddy
Hair:  Light brown
Eyes:  Grey
Height:  5’3”
Distinguishing marks:  Dark large mole inside each arm

Souces;
• New South Wales, Australia, Convict Indents, 1788-1842
• New South Wales, Australia, Convict Registers of Conditional and Absolute Pardons, 1788-1870

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote:

Source for The Voyage of Convict Ship Lord Melville 1829.
Free Settler or Felon Website. http://www.jenwilletts.com/convict_ship_lord_melville_1829.htm
Original reference.
(1) Accounts and Papers, thirteen volumes. Relating to convicts; criminals; forgery; debtors; penitentiary; police; &c. Session 5 February—23 July 1830. Vol. XXIII. , Bodleian Library, Oxford

Ron Garbutt on 17th June, 2015 wrote:

Source for Details for the ship Lord Melville II (1) (1829)

Claim a Convict website. http://www.hawkesbury.net.au/claimaconvict/shipDetails.php?shipId=389

Ron Garbutt on 17th June, 2015 wrote:

Source for the Story of John Mills

The story of John Mills, told here in the entries titled:Trial and Transportation, Pardon and Marriage, John and Eliza’s Children and Birth of a Second Son is sourced from the Beyond the Shores pages at website: manusugreek.webs.com

Ron Garbutt on 18th June, 2015 wrote:

Source for Story of John Mills
If the the web address given above does not work, try this one. http://www.freewebs.com/manusugreek/beyondtheshores.htm
Note. This appears to be a website under construction (or one that was never completed)

Ron Garbutt on 27th May, 2022 wrote:

The Source website for: The Story of John Mills can no longer be accessed. when access is attempted the following message pops up - Sorry, this page was not found.
Looks like the page you were looking for is no longer available.

Ron Garbutt on 28th May, 2022 wrote:

Death date removed because there is so much information missing from the death registration that it cannot be reliably linked to THIS particular John Mills.

Convict Changes History

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 made the following changes:

date of death: 3rd January, 1876 (prev. 0000), crime

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 made the following changes:

gender: m

Ron Garbutt on 2nd June, 2015 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1807 (prev. 0000)

Ron Garbutt on 6th June, 2015 made the following changes:

occupation

Ron Garbutt on 28th May, 2022 made the following changes:

date of death: 0000 (prev. 3rd January, 1876)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au