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John Owen

John Owen, one of 262 convicts transported on the Lady Penrhyn, Scarborough and Alexander, January 1787

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Owen
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 17th January, 1769
Occupation: -
Date of Death: 2nd November, 1828
Age: 59 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 60 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Hamesucken/assault
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Lady Penrhyn, Scarborough and Alexander
Departure date: January, 1787
Arrival date: 22nd January, 1788
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 293 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 4
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

John Swan on 2nd January, 2018 wrote:

THOMAS POPPLEWELL, JOHN OWEN, Theft > grand larceny, 10th September 1783.
 
Reference Number: t17830910-97
Offence: Theft > grand larceny
Verdict: Guilty
Punishment: Transportation
Related Material: Associated Records
Corrections: Add a correction
Actions: Cite this text
Old Bailey Proceedings Online(http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 7.0, 01 September 2012), September 1783, trial of THOMAS POPPLEWELL JOHN OWEN (t17830910-97).
 
691. THOMAS POPPLEWELL and JOHN OWEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August last, one wooden case, value 3 s. eighteen case knives, value 2 s. eighteen table forks, value 2 s. the property of Henry Creed .
JAMES BIGG sworn.
I am servant to Mr. Creed; I have a case of knives and forks which was in the front parlour in my master’s house, on the sideboard, it was the 5th of August I believe, I saw it there on Sunday, I missed it about four o’clock in the afternoon; it was found under the wall on the backside of the house; I was eating my dinner and the alarm was given; a little girl came and rang at the gate, I got up from my dinner and one of the knife boxes was gone, and one stood in the window; I ran across the field and got into the next field, and I took one of them just against Haggerston; I took Owen, the other ran on before through Kingsland, I called stop thief! nobody stopped him; he was taken that night by the constables; this was about a mile from my master’s house.
Was any body running after them when you first saw them? - Nobody at all.
MARTHA STEVENS sworn.
Court. How old are you? - Fourteen.
Do you know the consequence of taking a false oath? - Yes.
What is the consequence? - Doing wrong.
Then I hope you will not do wrong now, but speak the truth? - Yes, I saw one of these boys, Popplewell, the inside of Mr. Creed’s court yard, on a Wednesday, about a quarter past four o’clock; the other was outside the court-yard, and took the things over; Popplewell gave the things over to Owen; the parlour window was on the jar, I was against the rails before the house; I was going into the fields and I saw them.
Did they see you? - Yes, after they gave these things to the other boy, they were taking the other case out of the window; they run away the moment they saw me, I went and rang the bell, I saw the gentlewoman herself, and I told her the boys were taking the things out of the window.
What became of the case? - It was dropped under the brick wall, I saw them take it away, and they lifted it over and dropped it under the brick wall; I did not see them drop it.
(The knife case deposed to.)
PRISONER OWEN’S DEFENCE.
I am fourteen years old, I never saw the girl before, I was taking a walk round, and some boys came up to me, and said there was a mad bull, and presently a gentleman pursued me and took me back; the girl said, she did not positively know me at first; at last they persuaded her to it.
PRISONER POPPLEWELL’S DEFENCE.
I never saw Owen, and was not near the place, I was in no fault at all, I was 
at home working, I never saw the girl in my life.
 
Court to Stevens. Had you ever seen them boys before? - No.
Are you sure these are the boy s? - Yes, I am.
THOMAS POPPLEWELL , JOHN OWEN ,
GUILTY .
Transported for seven years .
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.
Convict’s Timeline
Posted 01 Sep 2012 by jjjjswan
About John Owen
John Owen was convicted of the theft of a case with 18 Knives and forks to the value of 7s and arrived on the Scarborough (1st Fleet). Once here he was charged with aiding and abetting William Boggis with the rape of Lydia Monroe (see “Founders of Australia” and “Women of Botany Bay”.)
13 September 1788 - Sentenced to receive 50 lashes for aiding and abetting William BOGGIS in the attempted rape of Lydia MUNRO. The sentence was remitted before it could be given.
16 January 1789 - Sentenced to 100 lashes, with 3 other convicts, for being absent from the camp at Rose Hill for 3 days
3 November 1794 - Received a 30 acre land grant at Mulgrave Place
1801 - Listed as an emancipist living at Sydney
1806 - Working as a boatman
1814 - Listed as a seaman on the ‘John Palmer’
————————-
OWEN, John (c1769-1828?)
John Owen, with another boy, was chased across a field when a box of 18 table knives and forks was missed from the sideboard in a house. He said in court, “I am fourteen years old [and was] taking a walk round, and some boys came up to me, and said there was a mad bull, and presently a gentleman pursued us and took me back.” He was sentenced to transportation for seven years at the Old Bailey on 10 September 1783 and received on the ‘Censor’ hulk on 4 October where he remained until sent on 24 February 1787 by wagon to Portsmouth to embark on ‘Scarborough’ on the 27th.
At Port Jackson Owen was charged with aiding and abetting William Boggis (qv) on 13 September 1788 when he tried to rape Lydia Munro (qv) and was ordered 50 lashes. The notation “afterwards forgiven” appears after the sentence. On 16 January 1789, with three other convicts, he was ordered to receive 100 lashes for a three day absence from camp at Rose Hill.
A daughter by John Owen and Mary Flanagan (‘Lady Juliana’ aged 25 on 1789 embarkation list) was baptised on 25 December 1791, and a child of John Owen and Hannah East (Ann East, Mary Ann 1791) was baptised at Parramatta on 2 December 1792, a second child born to this couple on 10 October 1794. At this time it is not possible to be sure that these John Owens were the same man or two others, not First Fleeters. A John Owen was granted 30 acres at Mulgrave Place on 3 November 1794, and was off stores at 24 October 1795. In 1800 this farm was recorded as leased to commissary James Williamson. In 1801 the First Fleet John Owen was listed as an expiree living at Sydney.
The John Owen who received 25 acres at Field of Mars on 14 March 1795 was probably a NSW Corps man sharing with fellow soldiers a 325 acre grant. It was bought by John Macarthur on the 20th. A John Owen on 4 April 1797 was acquitted of a debt to James Larra after explaining that he had sold some pigs to James Ruse and given the money to Larra.
The First Fleeter is more clearly identified as a boatman in 1806, and a seaman on the vessel ‘John Palmer’ in 1814. In 1822 and 1825 a John Owens, labourer, was listed as a former convict first at Parramatta then at Windsor. But this man’s ship of arrival was given as ‘Friendship’. He died at the Sydney Benevolent Asylum in 1826, aged given as 50, described as a labourer of George Street, his burial registered at St James’ on 3 November 1826.
 
John Owen, convict’s Timeline
1768
1768
Birth of John
England
 1783
September 10, 1783
Age 15
Trial of John Owen
London, England
THOMAS POPPLEWELL and JOHN OWEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August last, one wooden case, value 3 s. eighteen case knives, value 2 s. eighteen table forks, value 2 s. the property of Henry Creed .
JAMES BIGG sworn.
I am servant to Mr. Creed; I have a case of knives and forks which was in the front parlour in my master’s house, on the sideboard, it was the 5th of August I believe, I saw it there on Sunday, I missed it about four o’clock in the afternoon; it was found under the wall on the backside of the house; I was eating my dinner and the alarm was given; a little girl came and rang at the gate, I got up from my dinner and one of the knife boxes was gone, and one stood in the window; I ran across the field and got into the next field, and I took one of them just against Haggerston; I took Owen, the other ran on before through Kingsland, I called stop thief! nobody stopped him; he was taken that night by the constables; this was about a mile from my master’s house.
Was any body running after them when you first saw them? - Nobody at all.
MARTHA STEVENS sworn.
Court. How old are you? - Fourteen.
Do you know the consequence of taking a false oath? - Yes.
What is the consequence? - Doing wrong.
Then I hope you will not do wrong now, but speak the truth? - Yes, I saw one of these boys, Popplewell, the inside of Mr. Creed’s court yard, on a Wednesday, about a quarter past four o’clock; the other was outside the court-yard, and took the things over; Popplewell gave the things over to Owen; the parlour window was on the jar, I was against the rails before the house; I was going into the fields and I saw them.
Did they see you? - Yes, after they gave these things to the other boy, they were taking the other case out of the window; they run away the moment they saw me, I went and rang the bell, I saw the gentlewoman herself, and I told her the boys were taking the things out of the window.
What became of the case? - It was dropped under the brick wall, I saw them take it away, and they lifted it over and dropped it under the brick wall; I did not see them drop it.
(The knife case deposed to.)
PRISONER OWEN’S DEFENCE.
I am fourteen years old, I never saw the girl before, I was taking a walk round, and some boys came up to me, and said there was a mad bull, and presently a gentleman pursued me and took me back; the girl said, she did not positively know me at first; at last they persuaded her to it.
PRISONER POPPLEWELL’S DEFENCE.
I never saw Owen, and was not near the place, I was in no fault at all, I was at home working, I never saw the girl in my life.
Court to Stevens. Had you ever seen them boys before? - No.
Are you sure these are the boys? - Yes, I am.
THOMAS POPPLEWELL , JOHN OWEN ,
GUILTY .
Transported for seven years .
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron HOTHAM.
 1787
May, 1787
- January 26, 1788
Age 19
Transportation to Australia of John Owen
Spithead, England
John Owen was convicted of the theft of a case with 18 Knives and 2 forks to the value of 7s and arrived on the “Scarborough”, 1st Fleet.
 1788
September 13, 1788
Age 20
Sentencing of John Owen
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Sentenced to receive 50 lashes for aiding and abetting William BOGGIS in the attempted rape of Lydia MUNRO. The sentence was remitted before it could be given.
 1789
January 16, 1789
Age 21
Sentencing of John Owen
Rosehill, New South Wales, Australia
Sentenced to 100 lashes, with 3 other convicts, for being absent from the camp at Rose Hill for 3 days
 1791
1791
Age 23
Birth of Charlotte Owen
New South Wales, Australia
 1794
1794
Age 26
Birth of Sophia Smithers
  
November 3, 1794
Age 26
Land grant given to John Owen
Mulgrave, New South Wales, Australia
Received a 30 acre land grant at Mulgrave Place
  
1794
Age 26
Birth of Thomas East/Owen
New South Wales, Australia
 1806
1806
Age 38
John worked
 
Aid & Abet Rape
Posted 01 Sep 2012 by jjjjswan
On 12 September 1788 Lydia narrowly escaped being sexually assaulted by William Boggis and John Owen, both of whom had come across Letitia as she was going to bathe with Elizabeth Cole, as noted in an officer’s diary:
Friday, 12th September: Clear, with light sea and land breezes. Temperature 72 degrees F…
Lydia Munro and Elizabeth Cole decided to have a bathe after finishing their work. They went over the hill on the West side, and met William Boggis and John Owen, who followed them. Lydia Munro told them to go home, but Boggis told Owen that he would have connection with her before he went. Hearing this, Munro turned to go home herself, but Boggis threw her down among the bushes. She told him to go away, but he persisted in his attempt, and she started screaming. Daniel Gordon came to her assistance and found her, with her petticoats half up and Boggis lying on her. He struck Boggis with a stick.
Saturday, 13th September: Clear with light variable Easterlies. Temperature 70 degrees F.
Collins and Hunter, sitting as magistrates, heard a charge against William Boggis, who was accused by Lydia Munro of wanting to have connection with her, against her will. John Owen was charged with aiding and assisting in the same. Lydia Munro, Elizabeth Cole, Daniel Gordon and William Boggis gave evidence. Boggis’ defense was that it was not likely that he should want to have connection with the woman with two or three other people present.
Boggis and Owen were found guilty, Boggis was sentenced to receive 100 lashes and Owen to receive 50.10 Boggis had been:
“... tried at Kingston upon Thames, Surrey on 3 February 1783 for stealing a sheet with a value of 3 shillings. He was sentenced to transportation for 7 years and left England on the Scarborough aged about 20 at that time (May 1787). His occupation was listed as fisherman…11
Boggis has been tried only a month earlier on 2 August 1788 for
“gambling with a knife and sentenced to recieve 50 lashes. In July 1789 he received 200 lashes for stealing a shirt from a hut. In 1789 he was sentenced to wear a label with the word THIEF upon it.“12

John Owen received 100 lashes
Posted 09 Sep 2012 by jjjjswan
16 Jan 1789Location
New South Wales, Australia
Description
John Owen received 100 lashes on this day, punishment for a 3 day abscence from camp.
John Owen’s Land grant
Posted 11 Dec 2012 by jjjjswan
John Owen was sentenced on 10th September 1783, so had served his 7 years within 4 years of his arrival in Sydney.  It is likely he settled in the Hawkesbury as early as 1793. It wasn’t until 1794 that, as an ex-convict John Owen was granted 30 acres of land on the Hawkesbury at Wilberforce Reach.  The settlement was known as Mulgrave Place, and is near the present day Pitt-Town. Hannah (Ann) East, partnering John Owen, was probably the 8th woman on the Hawkesbury arriving around April 1794. By 28th April there were eight women and 5 or 6 children at Mulgrave Place. John East, the son of John Owen and Hannah East was likely to have been one of these children. John was born 21st November 1792.  Their second son Thomas was probably born here on 10th October 1794. In the 1796 land grants, John Owen is listed as still in ownership of his 30 acre grant. By 1800, John Owens 30 acre land grant had been combined with two other original 30 acre grants (to Edward Cunningham and Peter Bond) and acquired by Assistant Commissary James Williamson, managed by overseer ex-convict John Brenan, transported for his involvement in Irish uprisings. Compiled from Hawkesbury Settlement Revealed – A new look at Australia’s third mainland settlement 1793-1802. by Jan Barkley-Jack. 2009.
John Owen’s conviction
Posted 11 Dec 2012 by jjjjswan
John Owen, at the age of fourteen, and with another boy, was chased across a field when a box of 18 table knives went missing from the sideboard in a house. He said in court “I was taking a walk round, and some boys came up to me, and said there was a mad bull, and presently a gentleman pursued us and took us back.” He was sentenced to transportation for seven years at the Old Bailey on 10 September 1783, and was received on the Censor hulk on 4 October where he remained for over 3 years.  On 24 February 1787 he was taken by wagon to Portsmouth and embarked on the “Scarborough”, part of the First Fleet to Australia, 3 days later.

Convict Changes History

John Swan on 2nd January, 2018 made the following changes:

date of birth: 17th January, 1769 (prev. 0000), date of death: 2nd November, 1828 (prev. 0000), gender: m, crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au