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Mary Parker

Mary Parker, one of 262 convicts transported on the Lady Penrhyn, Scarborough and Alexander, January 1787

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Mary Parker
Aliases: none
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 26th August, 1758
Occupation: Housewife
Date of Death: 5th April, 1824
Age: 65 years

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Old Bailey
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Lady Penrhyn, Scarborough and Alexander
Departure date: January, 1787
Arrival date: 22nd January, 1788
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 293 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 10 Old Bailey on line
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Ken Austin on 18th April, 2012 wrote:

Married fellow convict John Small in 1788. They were given a farm in Ryde, and had twelve children. She died, drowned in small lake near her home, couldnt swim. Family flourished, and John Small was quite affluent in later times. They were my great great etc grandparents on my fathers side.

Denis Pember on 7th January, 2016 wrote:

MARY PARKER was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hickman , about the hour of eleven in the night, on the 19th day of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, two muslin gowns and coats, value 40 s. a cotton gown, value 10 s. three cotton frocks, value 4 s. a callico bed-gown, value 2 s. four pair of cotton pockets, value 4 s. eleven shirts, value 3 l. one shift, value 2 s. and one diaper clout, value 6 d. his property.

She was tried by the First Middlesex Jury before Mr Baron Eyre. Found guilty of stealing and sentenced to transportation for 7 years.

Mary had previously been incarcerated for thefts from the same property.

Phil Hands on 28th May, 2017 wrote:

Mary Parker was in service in the house of John Hickman and was accused of stealing two of Mrs Hickman’s tablecloths, value of 5s in April 1785. She was held in New Prison, Clerkenwell for six months before her trial on 21st September 1785. She was sentenced to a further 6 months confinement. She was employed during this period as a prison nurse and her prison term would have ended on 24th March 1786.
It was only a few weeks later when she apparently stole again from her old employer!
Tried and convicted at the Old Bailey on 26th April 1786 for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hickman , about the hour of eleven in the night, on the 19th day of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, two muslin gowns and coats, value 40 s. a cotton gown, value 10 s. three cotton frocks, value 4 s. a callico bed-gown, value 2 s. four pair of cotton pockets, value 4 s. eleven shirts, value 3 l. one shift, value 2 s. and one diaper clout, value 6 d. his property, sentenced to transportation for 7 years. For the next eight months she was held in Newgate prison before embarking on her transport vessel on 6th January 1787.
Left England on 13th May 1787.
Ship:- the ‘Lady Penrhyn’ sailed with 101 female convicts on board of which 3 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 26th January 1788.

Stories of Mary helping other convicts whilst on the ship are recorded and the fact came to the notice of the authorities. Consequently she was employed at the hospital as an assistant to the nurses. There are also family stories that she was a servant at Government House. This could be possible as her name is not on the Victualling list because of this.
Mary was married by Richard Johnson, Chaplain, to convict John Small (‘Charlotte’ 1788) on 12th October 1788. This would have been in the open and later recorded in the Register of St Philip’s Sydney. Mary and John had 7 children Between 1789-1804, all of whom attained maturity, quite a feat in those times. Although like everyone else at this time Mary and John were both small people under 5’ 6” in height, all the boys grew to be a robust 6 foot tall.
After living in Sydney and then Parramatta the family moved to Kissing Point, Ryde in 1794 (Recorded as Eastern Farms). On this farm the family grew and prospered. They would have had some status in the community as John was the District Constable.

Mary died suddenly and tragically on 4th April 1824. An inquest commencing on the next day, the 5th, shows the circumstances as follows: Mary was walking near a large hole of seven feet depth of water, close to which is a footpath. Mary missed her footing and fell into the water of the foresaid large hole, and then drowning, she instantly died. Her son John attested that about 6 o’clock in the evening he was at his brother William’s house, when his wife asked him to fetch a pail of water. John and William walked to the well, which was a large hole 7 feet deep. As they approached the well they could see two shoes and a woman’s cap floating on the surface. William stooped and got out one of the shoes and said that he feared it was his mother’s. John stayed at the well whilst William ran to the house and found that his mother had been from home for some time. Whilst his brother was gone John got a pole and raised a female to the surface, and found it to be his mother. Efforts to revive her were without effect. She was dead at the age of 66 years. Mary had last been seen at about 2 o’clock by her son Samuel who lived with her. When the coroner asked what state Mary had been in lately her son said that at times she appeared childish, but had supposed it to be infirmity of old age.

Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser Thurs 8th Apilr 1824
Drowned, at Kissing Point, on the evening of Sunday last, Mrs. Mary Small. An Inquest sat on the body. Verdict - Drowned by Accident.

Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t17860426-4

322. MARY PARKER was indicted for burglariously and feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hickman , about the hour of eleven in the night, on the 19th day of April last, and burglariously stealing therein, two muslin gowns and coats, value 40 s. a cotton gown, value 10 s. three cotton frocks, value 4 s. a callico bed-gown, value 2 s. four pair of cotton pockets, value 4 s. eleven shirts, value 3 l. one shift, value 2 s. and one diaper clout, value 6 d. his property .
MARY HICKMAN sworn.
I am wife of John Hickman , I live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury . I take in washing; I was washing on Wednesday last, till ten at night, I carried up the things and hung them on the line in the garret; I was not gone to bed, when the prisoner was taken, there was an alarm of thieves, I ran up in my hurry, and another witness who is here, and his lodger, he run up also; then when was going up two pair of stairs I met Mr. Headland and the prisoner on the stairs, I knew her again, she had no property about her, I went up stairs to see how my things were, all my shirts and frocks were laying about, and some in a heap in a corner, I came down again and I fetched a constable.
- HEADLAND sworn.
I lodge in his house, had been out, and this little boy had been in to my wife to light a candle, came in about half past ten, the little o run down to me, and said, there was somebody in the garret, I went up stairs, and I stood and called twice at the bottom of the garret stairs before I went up, there was no answer; I went up stairs, and saw the linen lay on the stairs, I went into the garret, and saw some things lay about the room, and some things in a heap at one corner, I turned about and saw the prisoner in the room, in one corner to the right hand, she did not lodge in the house; I knew her, she had lived with Mr. Hickman before, I asked her what she was at, and she gave me no answer; I said to her, Molly, what do you mean to come here to rob your mistress again, and I said, come, bundle out of the room; she set off to come out of the room, and she stooped to put her shoes on which were off, I stood by the door and caught hold of her gown tail, and she asked me in the passage to let her go out, I told her no.
Court to Hickman. Had you hung up your things? - I hung up every one of them.
Where did you put the two muslin gowns, and the cotton gowns, and the three frocks, and the bed-gown, the three pair of cotton stockings, the shirts, the shift, and the clout? - They were all hanging on the lines in the same garret; they were the clothes of different people that I wash for.
PRISONER’s DEFENCE.
I was not in the garret; I went to speak to the gentlewoman that lodged in the two pair of stairs, to ask a person to give me a character; she was not at home.
Court to Prosecutrix. Had you fastened your garret-door? - Yes; I had the key in my parlour.
What, did you lock the door? - Oh yes! I locked it myself, and hung the key in my parlour; when I came up, the door was standing wide open; it was wrenched open.
What marks were there upon the door of its having been wrenched open? - I do not know.
Perhaps it was slipped back, and an old lock? - No, no, no, no! I am too well used to it for that, it is not a bad lock.
There were no marks of violence on the door? - I cannot tell.
What does the bolt of the lock shut into? - Into a great iron staple.
In what condition was that staple? - It was in the same place.
How had the lock been got out of that staple? - By two great nails.
Jury. Have you the key of the lock with you? - No.
Court. Did you observe whether the bolt of the lock, when you came up stairs, was shut or pushed back? - It was pushed quite level to the door.
SAMUEL ABBOTT sworn.
The prosecutrix came and called me up to take charge of the prisoner; I went, and took her in custody; the prosecutrix took me up to the garret; when I came up the garret stairs, there lay some shirts and some linen, then she took me into the garret door; the prosecutrix gave me these two nails.
Prosecutrix. I saw the prisoner come down stairs with these nails in her hand, and when she put on her shoes, she dropped them beside her shoes in the passage.
Did you see her drop them? - No, I saw them in her hand.
Who saw her drop them? - My servant, her name is Nanny; she is not here.
Court. How do you know that she did this with these two nails? - She could not get it open with any thing else.
Yes she might, with a false key? - Oh, no, no.
Prisoner. I never saw the nails till they were fetched out of the parlour from Mr. Hickman to give to the constable.
Have you any friends or witnesses? - I have none in London.

GUILTY, Of stealing, but not of the burglary .
Transportation for 7 years.
Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron EYRE

Convict Changes History

Ken Austin on 18th April, 2012 made the following changes:

date of birth 1758-08-26, date of death 1824-04-05, gender f

Denis Pember on 6th January, 2016 made the following changes:

crime

Phil Hands on 28th May, 2017 made the following changes:

convicted at, source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 10 Old Bailey on line (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 10)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au