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John Pye

John Pye, one of 106 convicts transported on the Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary, January 1791

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: John Pye
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 22nd March, 1769
Occupation: Farmer
Date of Death: 22nd September, 1830
Age: 61 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 14 years

Crime: Arson
Convicted at: Warwick Assizes
Sentence term: 14 years
Ship: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Ann
Departure date: January, 1791
Arrival date: 9th July, 1791
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 994 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 143 (73)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Denis Pember on 25th November, 2015 wrote:

In the colony, John married Mary Norton (Convict, Mary Ann, 1791). They were married December 11th 1791, at Parramatta.
John and Mary had 8 children between 1791 and 1808.

Denis Pember on 25th November, 2015 wrote:

Five years after arriving in the colony John was given a 30 acre grant in Baulkham Hills by Governor Hunter. Later additions formed his home ‘Pye Farm’ near the junction of Old Northern Road and the Windsor Road.

John built an inn known as the ‘Lamb and Lark’ on the site of the more recent ‘Bull and Bush’ hotel at Baulkham Hills, and he was an early wool grower, being able to supply fleeces to the Government factory at Parramatta from his flocks at Toongabbie.

Denis Pember on 25th November, 2015 wrote:

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Ref P1461] Pye, John, 60, CF(?), Brittania 1791, Farmer at Seven Hills. 1210 acres, 260 cleared, 100 cultivated, 20 horses, 762 cattle, 100 sheep.
(Doing very nicely thankyou! Seems to have forgotten he was transported?)
[Ref P1462] Pye, Mary, 65, CF(?), Mary Ann, 1791.
Also James 25, Sarah, 27, Elizabeth 23 and Jane 21, all Born in the colony and all living at home.
Nearby:- Joseph 32 [Ref P1435] Landholder with his wife and family.
John (jnr) 31 [Ref P1447] Publican with wife and family.
Thomas 29 [P1452] Farmer single.
The other child, Mary had died, aged 13 in 1813.

Phil Hands on 1st July, 2017 wrote:

Tried on 31st July 1790 in Warwickshire for arson and sentenced to 14 years transportation.
Left England on 27th March 1791.
Ship:- the ‘Brittania’ sailed with 150 male convicts on board of which 21 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 14th October 1791.

In the colony, John married Mary Norton (Convict, Mary Ann, 1791). They were married on December 11th 1791, at Parramatta.
John and Mary had 8 children between 1791 and 1808.

John Pye’s Inn - “The Lamb & The Lark”
On 30 December 1796 a convict named John Pye was granted 20 acres of land in the Toongabbie District. With a further 30 acres granted in 1802, he set about becoming a pioneer in the district, a model citizen, successful farmer and innkeeper. In 1810 Governor Macquarie described Pye as an ‘industrious settler’ whose farm (was) ‘well cultivated in most excellent order with good offices, and comfortable decent dwelling here’.
Fortunately for John Pye, the route of the new road from Parramatta to Windsor crossed the road to Seven Hills on part of his land, cutting off a small triangle in the north-western corner of the property. This plot of land being on the meeting of two of the colonies major thoroughfares offered an ideal position for establishing an inn.
The intersection became known as “Pye’s Corner” and within a few years an inn known as the “Lamb and Lark” had been established. It was a small timber cottage with a veranda at the front offering welcome hospitality to travellers.
John Pye died on 25th September 1830 aged 63 and left the Lamb and Lark to his son John Pye Junior.

1845 saw John Pye Junior lease the inn to John Williams and Andrew Nash. Nash was a well-known Parramatta publican and entrepreneur who also held the licenses for the famous “Woolpack Inn” and the “Hawkesbury Inn”. John Williams, who later became Parramatta’s first Mayor was also associated with the Woolpack Inn.
When John Pye Junior died in 31 December 1845 he left the Lamb and Lark to his son John Pye III with his elder daughter Mary Elizabeth, to receive income from the property for life.
John Pye III subsequently died on 24 June 1853 at the age of 22, interstate, without children, so the entire estate passed in 1858 to his elder sister and her husband Samuel Jenner.
Mary Elizabeth and Samuel Jenner mortgaged the property in 1854 with they and their children continuing to receive rent from the property. In 1884 the surviving children sold their life interest to Daniel Horwood, who had become mortgagee

Convict Changes History

Greg Lawler on 15th March, 2015 made the following changes:

occupation, crime

Denis Pember on 22nd November, 2015 made the following changes:

date of birth: 22nd March, 1769 (prev. 0000), date of death: 22nd September, 1830 (prev. 0000), gender: m

Phil Hands on 1st July, 2017 made the following changes:

occupation

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