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Richard Ridge

Richard Ridge, one of 106 convicts transported on the Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Mary, January 1791

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Richard Ridge
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1768
Occupation: Farmer
Date of Death: 1st January, 1842
Age: 74 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Old Bailey
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Active, Albermarle, Atlantic, Barrington, Britannia, Mary Ann, Matilda, Salamander and William and Ann
Departure date: January, 1791
Arrival date: 9th July, 1791
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 994 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 112
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

donald mc dougall on 11th November, 2014 wrote:

Occupation Richard became the provost-marshal’s bailiff and was the district constable. In 1816 he was appointed bailiff for the whole colony which, added to constabulary duties reaching from Portland Head to the Colo River and management of his farms, was quite a handful.
1809 married Margaret Forrester daughter of Robert, 1st fleeter

Phil Hands on 16th July, 2017 wrote:

Tried and convicted of burglary and theft at the Old Bailey on 9th September 1789, sentenced to transportation for 7 years.
Left Portsmouth on 27th March 1791.
Ship:- the ‘Atlantic’ sailed with 220 male convicts on board of which 18 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 20th August 1791.

By 1801 he was living with convict Jane Poole (‘Charlotte’ 1788) they had 1 child and jointly held 60 acres of land.

He married Margaret Forrester (daughter of convicts Robert Forrester, ‘Scarborough’ 1788 & Isabella Ramsay, ‘Mary Ann’ 1791) on 7th November 1809 at Sydney, they had 11 children between 1811-1831.
Richard became the provost-marshal’s bailiff and was the district constable in 1812.
In 1816 he was appointed bailiff for the whole colony which, added to constabulary duties reaching from Portland Head to the Colo River and management of his farms, was quite a handful.

Sydney Gazette Saturday 15th June 1816 p. 2
PROVOST MARSHAL’S OFFICE,
Sydney, June 15, 1816.
THE Public are hereby informed, that I have appointed Mr Richard Ridge to act as my Bailiff throughout the Colony.
WM. GORE, Provost Marshal.

In 1822 he appears in Muster records as the master of 10 convicts.

Richard died on 1st January 1842 in Windsor NSW.

Sydney Herald Wednesday 5th January 1842 p. 3
DIED.
At his son’s residence, Windsor, on the 1st instant, Mr. Richard Ridge, in the 76th year of his age,a very old and much respected Colonist.

Australasian Chronicle Tuesday 4th January 1842 p. 2
WINDSOR. -
An inquest was hold yesterday on the body of Richard Ridge, who died suddenly on the previous morning while at breakfast.
Upon inquiry, it was found that death was caused by apoplexy. A verdict was returned accordingly.

Old Bailey Trial Transcript.
Reference Number: t17890909-10

583. RICHARD RIDGE , GILBERT BAKER , WILLIAM LLOYD , WILLIAM SHAW , and JAMES M’CAULEY , were indicted, for feloniously and burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Susannah Dewell , on the 21st of August last, about nine in the night, and burglariously stealing therein, a stuff coat, value 1 s. two cloth waistcoats, value 4 s. a child’s cotton ditto, value 2 s. a cotton bedgown, value 2 s. a flannel waistcoat, value 3 s. a shalloon ditto, value 3 s. and one cloth coat, value 2 s. her property .
SUSANNAH DEWELL sworn.
I am a sales-woman at Brentford , a widow ; on the 21st of August I was at work in the evening between eight and nine; it was quite dark without candles; I am sure I could not have seen anybody’s face, without a candle; I am very sure the door was shut, I heard the latch lift up; I asked who was there; there being no answer made, I got up; the shop was in the front towards the street, and the kitchen behind it; I missed from the shop the several articles in the indictment; some had been hanging without and some within, but they had been all taken down, and laid on the counter; I saw them afterwards on the Wednesday, at Bow-street.
Prisoner. She said at the justice’s, that her child might touch the latch? - I thought it might have been one of my children, but asking who was there, and they not answering, I got up immediately.
WILLIAM COLE sworn.
I lost nine geese, and I went in pursuit of some persons on the road; I took in my company, a man of the name of John Street; overtook the prisoners at Acton, at nine in the morning, they had two asses, loaden with hampers, there were many articles of wearing apparel in the hampers, and a crow.
ELIZABETH SPACE sworn.
I live three miles the other side of Brentford; on Saturday, the 27th of August, about five in the morning, I observed the prisoners, they are the men to the best of my knowledge; I saw four men and a boy, and I told Mr. Cole which way they went, towards Hessham.
CHARLES JEALOUS sworn.
I was at Bow-street when these men were brought in; a person came to me, and gave me information, and I took this waistcoat off M’Cauley, at Bow-street, and this coat I took off Ridge; I never saw Shaw or M’Cauley in my life, I am not the apprehender of any one of them.
Prosecutrix. This is my coat and waistcoat, and all these things; they were on the counter a few minutes before I got up, I am sure they are my property.
PRISONER RIDGE’s DEFENCE.
I had been seeking for work, and could not get any, I saw some men coming over Hounslow Heath, and they asked me if I had lost a jack-ass; they gave me a jack-ass, loaded with hampers, and they desired me to take and find an owner for it, so I drove it along, and I overtook this lad; the waistcoat and coat were at top; it rained, and I took the coat and put it on to keep off the rain; before I came to Acton, I overtook the other prisoners, and when we came to Acton, we were stopped, the man came to the jack-ass, and owned it at the justice’s.
PRISONER BAKER’s DEFENCE.
I went to Brentford, my father was extremely ill; I went with two of the other prisoners, I arrived there the Friday afternoon, I slept at the Bull, and got up about four in the morning, I was very ill, and came to Town, and I met these men, and this boy, driving a jack-ass and hampers; he asked what it was o’clock, it was past five; he said, which road are you going? I said, towards Acton to go home; then I went into the Red Lion, to get a pot of beer, and some bread and cheese, we came out, and Mr. Cole stopped us.
PRISONER M’CAULEY’s DEFENCE.
I got up to go to work about three in the morning; I went to the Bull, at Hounslow; I could not find my aunt’s, and the man overtook me; says he, here is a jackass strolling along, it was the gentleman in blue, that overtook me; but it rained, and he said, as it rains, we may as well put on these things; so I put on the waistcoat.
Court. How far is Acton from Brentford? - Rather better than three miles.
Court to Cole. Did any conversation pass about this business? - They owned one ass; Ridge owned that which was loaded, but not the others.
Did the others take any part? - Two of them tried to make their escape; that was Shaw, and Baker (the boy), they were all together, before I overtook them.
The prisoner Lloyd called two witnesses to his character.
The prisoner M’Cauley called four witnesses to his character.

ALL FIVE, GUILTY of stealing , sentenced to transportation for 7 years
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury before Mr. RECORDER.

Convict Changes History

donald mc dougall on 11th November, 2014 made the following changes:

convicted at, date of birth: 1768 (prev. 0000), date of death: 1st January, 1842 (prev. 0000), gender: m, occupation, crime

donald mc dougall on 11th November, 2014 made the following changes:

convicted at, date of birth: 1768 (prev. 0000), date of death: 1st January, 1842 (prev. 0000), gender: m, occupation, crime

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