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Joseph Solomon

Joseph Solomon, one of 160 convicts transported on the Prince Regent, 17 September 1819

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Joseph Solomon
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1780
Occupation: Shopkeeper
Date of Death: 1851
Age: 71 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 59 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Receiving stolen property
Convicted at: Kent Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Prince Regent
Departure date: 17th September, 1819
Arrival date: 27th January, 1820
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 171 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/3, Page Number 232 http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/solomon-joseph-2679
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

greg petersen on 10th September, 2017 wrote:

Australian Dictionary of biography notes:
Joseph Solomon, merchant, son of Abraham Solomon, was in partnership with his brother Judah (1777?-1856) as Jewish shopkeepers at Sheerness, England, when in August 1819 at the Kent Assizes they were convicted of hiring burglars to repossess unpaid goods. They arrived at Sydney in the Prince Regent next January and were sent in the Castle Forbes to Hobart Town, where they landed in March. By January 1821, trading as J. & J. Solomon, they had a general store at the corner of Liverpool and Argyle Streets. In June they were acquitted on a charge of selling spirits without a licence, though similar charges later cost them £50 in fines. In 1823 both brothers were foundation subscribers to the Bank of Van Diemen’s Land. By 1825 they had a new store in Argyle Street and had begun dealing in town and country land; Joseph had moved to Launceston, where he opened the Tasmanian Store in Cameron Street. He received his conditional pardon seven years later and his free pardon in 1836. By that time the brothers had opened a second business in Launceston, and a branch at Evandale which was soon raided by bushrangers, but the two brothers were drifting apart. Another store was opened at Campbell Town in 1838 and next year Joseph announced his withdrawal from the partnership, though it was not formally dissolved for three years.

Both brothers had left wives and families in England but, unlike Judah, Joseph had abandoned the Jewish faith and was joined by his lawful children, though his wife had died. At St John’s Church, Launceston, in July 1833 his son Lion Henry married Frances, daughter of Edward and Ann Symonds from Wolveton, Dorset, and on 17 November Joseph Solomon married Eliza Backas (Backhouse), the widowed daughter of Sharpland Graves of County Wicklow, Ireland. His three daughters also married: Mary to William Roberts in 1835, Sarah to Benjamin Walford in 1838 and Frances to Anthony Cottrell, who had been chief constable at Launceston and as a member of John Batman’s syndicate looked after Solomon’s speculations at Port Phillip. Solomon soon withdrew from his investments in Melbourne and with help from Lion was content to consolidate his business interests in Launceston, surrounded by his family. As his health declined he spent more time on his property near Evandale, where he had built his country home, Riverview. There he died on 14 May 1851, aged 71, and was buried in the Anglican churchyard at Evandale. He was survived by his wife, four children and thirteen grandchildren. He had left his estate in order, even making an annuity of £25 to an aged aunt in England, ‘this being the amount I have hitherto been in the habit of remitting to her’.

Solomon had no son named Joseph. In M. Gordon, Jews in Van Diemen’s Land (Sydney, 1965), Joseph Solomon has been credited with a son of that name. This is a wrong identification. The Joseph who went to Port Phillip in 1839 and lived for a time at Saltwater River may have been the son of Judah who contested the Huon electorate in Tasmania in 1880.

greg petersen on 10th September, 2017 wrote:

Sent to VDL onboard Castle Forbes
Conditional pardon# 333, 13th March 1833
Died of apoplexy 19th May 1851 in the district of Morven.

Maureen Withey on 22nd January, 2020 wrote:

https://stors.tas.gov.au/CON13-1-2$init=CON13-1-2p34
List of men sent from England to Port Jackson per Prince Regent (Anderson) to Hobart Town per Castle Forbes.
Joseph Solomon,  (brother of Judah Solomon) age 35, labourer & dealer, Tried at Kent, Aug 1819, Life, Jew.

Convict Changes History

greg petersen on 10th September, 2017 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/3, Page Number 232 http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/solomon-joseph-2679 (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/3, Page

greg petersen on 10th September, 2017 made the following changes:

crime

greg petersen on 10th September, 2017 made the following changes:

gender: m, crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au