Hi Guest!
Contribute to this record

Christian Sternbeck

Christian Sternback, one of 272 convicts transported on the Perseus and Coromandel, January 1802

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Christian Sternbeck
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1st March, 1781
Occupation: Farmer
Date of Death: 6th February, 1860
Age: 78 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 60 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Old Bailey
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Perseus and Coromandel
Departure date: January, 1802
Arrival date: 14th August, 1802
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 251 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 308
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

Did you find the person you were looking for?

If Christian Sternbeck was the person you were looking for, you may be able to discover more about them by looking at our resources page.

If you have more hunting to do, try a new search or browse the convict records.

Know more about Christian Sternbeck?

Contribute to this record

Community Contributions

Joanne Parsons on 3rd March, 2013 wrote:

Old Bailey Ref: t18000917-10 trial date 17/09/1800
Name appears as STIRNBACK.  Was sentenced to death then transportation. Christian is buried in the cemetery at St Matthews COE Windsor NSW

Rosenne on 7th March, 2013 wrote:

Christian married Sarah Miller 12 July 1813 at St Matthews Windsor, Hawkesbury, NSW.  They had 4 children, Ann Hannah, George, William and Elizabeth.
Sarah is the daughter of William Miller convict of the Third Fleet aboard the ‘Admiral Barrington’. (William Miller’s cousin was William Crew convict also aboard the ‘Admiral Barrinton’.
and
Ann Martin convict of the First Fleet aboard the ‘Lady Penrhyn’.

Phil Hands on 27th September, 2017 wrote:

Tried at the Old Bailey on 28th May 1800 for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Emanuel Hutchings , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 1st of March , and burglariously stealing nine gold twist rings, found not guilty and discharged.
About 14 weeks later he was tried again at the Old Bailey on 17th September 1800 for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Matthews, about the hour of nine in the night, of the 26th of January and stealing, two blankets, two sheets,  and a bed quilt, no luck for him this time as he was sentenced to death, this was later commuted to transportation for life.
Left England on 12th February 1802.
Ship:- the ‘Perseus’ sailed with 113 male convicts on board of which 1 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 14th August 1802.

Christian married Sarah Miller 12th July 1813 at St Matthews Windsor, Hawkesbury, NSW. They had 4 children, Ann Hannah 1815, George 1817, William 1819, and Elizabeth 1821.
Sarah was the daughter of William Miller convict of the Third Fleet aboard the ‘Albermarle’ 1791 and Ann Martin convict of the First Fleet aboard the ‘Lady Penrhyn’ 1788.

Sarah died on 10th September 1841 in St Albans, New South Wales age 46.

Christian died on 6th February 1860 at Windsor, New South Wales age 79.

Phil Hands on 27th September, 2017 wrote:

1st Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t18000528-49

388. RICHARD BAILEY , WILLIAM JOHNSON, alias YARMOUTH , and CHRISTIAN STIRNBACK , were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Emanuel Hutchings , about the hour of ten, in the night of the 1st of March , and burglariously stealing nine gold twist rings, value 9s. the property of the said Emanuel .
EMANUEL HUTCHINGS sworn. - I keep a house, No. 52, in the Minories : My house was broke open on Saturday the 1st of March, between nine and ten o’clock in the evening; in consequence of information from a neighbour, I looked in the window, and missed a card of nine rings; there was part of a square of glass cut out sufficient to admit a hand in.
JAMES CHESTERMAN sworn. - On the 1st of March, I was coming down the Minories, between nine and ten o’clock in the evening; I saw the three prisoners standing round the prosecutor’s window, and by knowing them I joined their company; soon after, Stirnback took a knife out of his pocket, and cut a piece of glass out; I was to have a part, but not an equal part, with the rest; then Johnson put his hand in and took out a card of rings, Johnson gave it to a man they call Dick the barber, (Bailey); then Stirnback put in his hand, and took out some penknives; then we all went to Mrs. Levy’s, in Rosemary-lane, but I did not go in; after they came out, I asked then for my share, and Stirnback gave me a shilling.
Q. What part did you take for that money? - A. The look out; then we parted, and I saw no more of them.
Q. Was it quite dark? - A. Yes; and the candles a-light in the shop.
SOPHIA LEVY sworn. - I live in Rosemary-lane: The three prisoners came to me on Saturday the 1st of March, between nine and ten o’clock at night; they all three came in with a dozen of penknives, and an open one; the prisoner, Bailey, brought them; they asked twelve shillings, I gave them five shillings and sixpence for them; they went away, and in a few minutes after they all returned, with a card with nine rings, but one of the prisoners kept one I bought eight of them, Dick the barber brought them in, I gave him four shillings for them; they were gold twisters.
Q. Are you sure the prisoners are the same three? - A. I am.
Q. Did you ask them how they came by them? - A. No.
Q. Is this the full value of them? - A. I cannot tell; they were very common ones.
JOHN COOKE sworn. - I am an officer belonging to the Public-office, Shadwell: I, with Haines, Brown, and Holebrook, apprehended the prisoners; Johnson was apprehended on the 8th of May, Stirnback was apprehended on the 14th of May, and the other on the 18th; I produce two gold twisted rings which I received from Mrs. Levy, on the 22d of this month, before the Magistrate.
Prosecutor. I cannot say that these are mine; they are like what I lost.
Q. In the trade, are they sold as gold twist rings? - A. They are.
Stirnback’s defence. I know nothing at all about it; I am very innocent.
Johnson’s defence. I know nothing of it.
Boiley’s defence. I was never near the person’s window.
Q. (To Hutchings.) Was four shillings a fair price for eight rings? - A. No; they are worth eight shillings at least, at the first hand.
Q. Did you miss any penknives near that square of glass? - A. No.
Chesterman. He put his arm in at the window, and reached all round to the left-hand, and took them out.
All Three NOT GUILTY .
Tried by the London Jury, before Mr. RECORDER.

2nd Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t18000917-10

597. THOMAS STEVENS and CHRISTIAN STIRNBACK were indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Matthews , about the hour of nine in the night, of the 26th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing, two blankets, value 7s. two sheets, value 1s. 6d. and a bed quilt, value 1s. the property of the said Mary.(The case was opened by Mr. Knapp.)
ELIZABETH SKELTON sworn. - I live in the house of Mary Matthews ; upon the 26th of January last, Mrs. Matthews was not at home; I had shut the window down in the front of the street, up one pair of stairs, it was about seven o’clock, it was quite dark then; about nine, I heard a foot over head as I was sitting by the fire; I went up stairs directly, I opened the door and went in, and saw the window up, and the bed stripped; I missed two blankets, two sheets, and a bed quilt; I had made the bed that evening; I screamed out thieves, fire, and murder at the window, and down the stairs too; I did not see any body there at all; I saw these things again three or four months after, upon the bed of a woman of the name of Sleep; I know them to be Mrs. Matthews’s.
JOSEPH HUFF sworn. - On the 26th of January, I went with Stirnback to the house of Mrs. Matthews, about nine o’clock at night; I lifted up Stevens upon my shoulder, and he shoved up the sash of the one pair of stairs window fronting the street; there was a woman coming by, and I put him down from my shoulder; then I put him up again, and he got in at the window; he was in about five minutes, and then called for Stirnback, he was standing at the Barley-mow, close by Stevens, then he brought out two blankets, two sheets, and a bed quilt, and gave them to Stirnback; then Stevens came out at the window, and left it open; then we all went across the rope walk, into Back-lane, St. George’s, to Mrs. Sleep’s; we asked her if she would buy some things we had brought from on board a ship; she looked at them, and we asked her eight shillings for them; she said she would give seven shillings and half a pint of gin; I told her she must give sixpence more, and she put the sixpence into my hand; we drank the gin together, and came away, and shared the money at the White-Swan.
ANN SLEEP sworn. - Examined by Mr. Knapp. Huff and Stirnback came to my house on the 26th of January last, rather before nine in the evening; I asked them how they came by them, and they said they brought them from on board a ship; I bought them, and gave seven shillings and sixpence and half a pint of gin; there was only one sheet, two blankets and a coverlid; the officers had them away.
Court. Q. What business do you follow? - A. I make children’s dresses, and deal in apparel; I have lived there these twenty years.( Robert Brown produced two blankets, a sheet, and a bed quilt.)
Mrs. Skelton. I know this blanket by its being moth-eaten, and dirty at the corner, and the other I know by its being marked, J. D. and a hole in the corner and dirty; the sheet is remarkably coarse, there is no mark upon it, any farther than where it is sewed up in three seams; I know this bed quilt, there were several pieces of Mrs. Matthews’s gown upon it, they are all her property.
MARY MATTHEWS sworn. - These are all my property.(Stirnback did not say any thing in his defence.)(Stevens was not put upon his defence.)
Stevens, NOT GUILTY .
Stirnback, GUILTY Death . (Aged 17.)
Tried by the second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice LE BLANC.

Convict Changes History

Joanne Parsons on 14th February, 2013 made the following changes:

date of birth 1st March, 1781, date of death 6th February, 1860, occupation

Joanne Parsons on 3rd March, 2013 made the following changes:

crime

Joanne Parsons on 3rd March, 2013 made the following changes:

surname Sternbeck (prev. Sternback), gender

Phil Hands on 27th September, 2017 made the following changes:

convicted at, crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au