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Thomas Terry

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Thomas Terry
Aliases: Turvy
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1793
Occupation: -
Date of Death: 21st September, 1823
Age: 30 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 54 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Old Bailey
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Guildford
Departure date: August, 1811
Arrival date: 18th January, 1812
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 10 other convicts

References

Primary source: Baxter, Carol; General Muster of New South Wales, 1814. Sainty, Malcolm and Johnson, Keith; 1828 Census of New South Wales. Old Baily on line convict ships to NSW
Source description:

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Community Contributions

Denis Pember on 4th February, 2016 wrote:

Baxter, Carol; 1814 Muster:
[Ref 4025] Thomas, Terry, Guidford, 1812, Off Stores. Assigned to Mr Drummond.

Denis Pember on 4th February, 2016 wrote:

Thomas married Ann Crouch (Convict, Mary Ann, 1816) on July 1st 1816 at Parramatta.
Thomas Terry age 23 per Guildford 1st of the parish of St John and Ann Crouch age 25 per Mary Ann of ditto were married in this church by banns this first day of July 1816 by me Samuel Marsden.
Thomas signed the register as “Thomas Terrey” and Ann made her X mark in the presence of George Greaves who signed the register
and Mary Miller who made her X mark.

Thomas and Ann had 4 children, Emma 1817, Joseph 1819, Thomas 1821 and Elizabeth 1824.
Little Elizabeth was born after the death of her father in September 1823 and died herself soon thereafter.

Denis Pember on 4th February, 2016 wrote:

Ann, now a widow with a young family was assigned help, one Thomas Collins (Convict, John Barry, 1821).  In 1827 Ann had another daughter, Bridget, who she named Terry, but should have been Collins!

Sainty & Johnson; 1828 Census of New South Wales:
[Ref T0313, page 364] Terry, Ann, 39, FS, Mary Ann, 1813, Settler at Airds. 30 acres, 25 cleared and 24 cultivated, 2 horses.
[Ref T0314] Terry, Emma, 11, born in colony.
[Ref T0315] Terry, Joseph, 9, born in colony.
[Ref T0316] Terry, Thomas, 7, born in colony.
[Ref T0317] Terry, Bridget, 1, born in colony.
and…....
[Ref C1802, page 96] Collins, Thomas, 28, FS, John Barry, 1821, Labourer, assigned to Mrs Ann Terry at Airds.

Phil Hands on 11th October, 2017 wrote:

Tried and convicted under the name Thomas Turvy at the Old Bailey on 31st October 1810 for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Jones; his wife and family being therein, about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 15th of August , and stealing 14 handkerchiefs, the property of Robert Middleton, Charles Inne , and John Jones, he was sentenced to death, this was later commuted to transportation for life.
Left England on 3rd September 1811.
Ship:- the ‘Guildford’ sailed with 200 male convicts on board of which 1 died during the voyage.
Arrived on 18th January 1812.

In the colony, Thomas married Ann Crouch (Convict, ‘Mary Ann I’ 1816).
Citation details: no 518
Thomas Terry age 23 per Guildford 1st of the parish of St John and Ann Crouch age 25 per Mary Ann of ditto were married in this church by banns this first day of July 1816 by me Samuel Marsden.
Thomas signed the register as “Thomas Terrey” and Ann made her X mark in the presence of George Greaves who signed the register and Mary Miller who made her X mark.

Ann and Thomas had 4 children, born between 1817 and early 1824. Emma 1812, Joseph 1819, Thomas 1821 and Elizabeth 1824. Elizabeth died as a young baby.
Thomas died on 21st September 1823. Ann then continued working the farm. In about 1823 she was assigned a convict, Thomas Collins (‘John Barry’ 1821), they then developed a de facto relationship and Ann had a further child, Bridget 1827. Bridget was named Terry but her father was clearly Thomas Collins.

Phil Hands on 11th October, 2017 wrote:

Old Bailey Trial Transcription.
Reference Number: t18101031-67

839. ROBERT FRANCIS and THOMAS TURVY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Jones ; his wife and family being therein, about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 15th of August , and stealing therein, fourteen handkerchiefs, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Middleton , Charles Innes , and John Jones .
JOHN JONES . My partner’s are Robert Middleton , and Charles Innes , we are linen drapers and haberdasher at the corner of Chancery-lane, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan’s in the West ; I am the inhabitant householder, the other partners reside elsewhere. I was the inhabitant householder on the 15th of August, and have been for some years.
Q. On the morning of the 15th of August, about nine o’clock, were you at home - A. I was.
Q. You were inside of the house at the same time information were given you, which is the substance of this charge - A. I was.
Q. Was your wife at home - A. I do not know how that was.
Q. Had you any handkerchiefs inside of your shop window - A. I am sure I had, it was our constant practice of dressing that window with handkerchiefs exhibited for sale.
Q. Do you know any thing of the fact of your house being broke open between nine and ten that morning - A. I knew my window was cut after some person came in and gave information that the window had been broken. One of my young men came and told me that my window was cut; when I came forward I found the window cut, and a piece of glass laying inside, on the handkerchiefs.
Q. Had you observed the window that morning before you had information that it was broke - A. On Monday the 13th of August the window was cut, and on the Tuesday I had it mended, and the putty being new they found no difficulty in pushing the glass of oneside, and on the Wednesday morning it was cut again between nine and ten o’clock. It was whole in the morning.
Q. When you perceived the window had been cut and the glass removed do you know whether any of your goods had been drawn out or removed by that means - A. I really do not know.
Q. Did you afterwards see any of your goods removed - A. None, whatever. The way the handkerchiefs were put in the window was as them books are, one up against another, till the window was full, I dare say there were a hundred poundsworth of handkerchiefs in the window. In the morning at that time I could not miss ten pound worth of handkerchiefs. I never recollect buying a piece of handkerchiefs that cost me less than two guineas prime cost for seven handkerchiefs.
Q. They are charged for stealing fourteen handkerchiefs - A. That is by the witness Bates, I know no more.
Q. The goods in this indictment were your goods and your partners - A. Yes.
RICHARD BATES . Q. Were you near Mr. Middleton’s and Jones’s the haberdashers - A. Yes, I work for Mr. Lee, Field-lane, Holborn, he is a shoe-maker. On the 15th of August, a quarter before nine in the morning, I was going to my work, and at the end of Chancery-lane I saw Francis, I had just passed Mr. Jones’s shop.
Q. Did you know his person before - A. Yes; he had Turvy in his company; I never saw Turvy before.
Q. Are you sure that Turvy was in his company - A. Yes, he was alongside of him.
Q. Did they appear to be in company together to act together - A. Yes; I saw Francis and the other both go up to the window, I watched them both; I then saw Francis pull something out of his waistcoat pocket, and break the window with it.
Q. Did he do it so as to make much noise - A. No, he did it pretty quiet. Then they walked up to the dial of St. Dunstan’s both together; I then saw them come back, Francis put his hand into the same window, he had broke; I then saw him pull out one piece of handkerchiefs and then pull out another, he put them in his bosom, the other was by him at the time; they both walked up Chancery-lane, I saw no more of them; I went home and informed my master of it.
Q. You did not go into the shop and inform the people of it - A. No, I was rather late that morning with my work, my master blowed me up, I told him what I had seen.
Q. You did not attempt to lay hold of these man, did you - A. No.
Q. When did you tell Mr. Middleton or any of them of it - A. I told my master of it first.
Q. Did you appear before the sitting Alderman when they were under examination - A. Yes, they were taken up on that very day, at six o’clock. On Thursday I appeared before the alderman, where they were under examination and repeated this story.
Q. I suppose the handkerchiefs which they took away was never found - A. No.
Francis. Q. I wish to ask him why he did not apprehend me if he saw me - A. Knowing him to be such a desperate character I thought he might do me an injury. I knew where to find him any hour in the day.
Francis. I think there were plenty of gentleman in the street for him to take me without hurting him.
ROBERT GUTHERIDGE . I am a servant of Mr. Biggs, fishmonger, near St. Clements church.
Q. Did you see any thing pass at Mr. Innes and Jones’s shop - A. On the 15th of August I was going a little way in the city, when I got to Chancery-lane I saw these two men on the opposite corner, I am quite sure the two men at the bar are the men that were close by Mr. Innes shop; I saw them go up to the window and make a stop, both of them; they stopped a short time with their faces towards their window; when they stepped away from the window I went up and saw a large piece of glass out of the pane, I immediately went in and gave information; I came out of the shop I crossed to the opposite side of the way I saw them turning to come back again.
Q. Where did they turn from - A. Somewhere about the church, they appeared to be making up towards the window again, they then saw a person within taking the goods away, they walked on toward Temple-bar, and I saw no more of them.
HENRY BEVIS . I am a city porter; I ply at the Temple-gate, that is directly opposite of this shop. On the 15th of August I was going down Fleet-street to deliver a message in Crown-court, I saw these two young men here at the corner of Horshoe-court or Fleur-de-luce-court, I cannot say which, at any rate it was in Fleet-street.
Q. Are you quite sure that these are the two persons that were in Fleet-street - A. I am. I returned to the Temple-gate again, a person came over and gave me information, I directed my attention towards the shop; I saw Francis pass the window, Turvy halted behind, he might be ten yards from him, and the moment Turvy passed I saw a lady with her hand taking the handkerchiefs from the window that was broke.
WILLIAM LEE . I apprehended the two prisoners at the bar. After the information I received from Bates I went to Mr. Jones’s instantly, I examined the square of glass, I found some instrument had pushed in the pane six inches by four, the piece of glass lay inside; when I went I was the whole day after the prisoners, I found them at the top of Drury-lane, St. Giles’s, about a quarter after six in the evening; they were standing together. I caught hold of Francis, and an assistant that I got from Bow-street caught hold of Turvy: Francis turned round and said, halloa, what is this? I told him, for Fleet-street; he said to Turvy, making use of an oath, have we been in Fleet-street to-day? I know nothing about it. I looked up a turning, saw a place of safety; I searched them, upon Turvy I found this small knife, the edges appears to have been rubbed off with a file, it appears to be an instrument for the purpose, I have seen such an instrument found off persons on a similar charge; I found another of the same sort on Francis, I had the misfortune to break it; I took them to Bow-street. This offence was committed in the city, they were remanded to the City. They were taken before the Alderman the next day.
RICHARD WILLIS . On the 15th of August Mr. Jones sent to our shop, said he had a square of glass broke by thieves; I went down and inspected the square; it had been broken by a sharp instrument, I think, by a knife. I mended the square on the Tuesday, and I mended it on the Wednesday.
Francis’s Defence. I know nothing at all about it, no more than a child unborn.
Turvy said nothing in his defence.
Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.
FRANCIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.
TURVY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Convict Changes History

Denis Pember on 4th February, 2016 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: years, voyage, source: Baxter, Carol; General Muster of New South Wales, 1814. Sainty, Malcolm and Johnson, Keith; 1828 Census of New South Wales. (prev. ), firstname: Thomas, surname: Terry, alias1: , alias2: , alias3: , alias4: , da

Phil Hands on 11th October, 2017 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: 99 years, source: Baxter, Carol; General Muster of New South Wales, 1814. Sainty, Malcolm and Johnson, Keith; 1828 Census of New South Wales. Old Baily on line convict ships to NSW (prev. Baxter, Carol; General Muster of New South Wale

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