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James Tilly

James Tilly, one of 220 convicts transported on the Lord Eldon, April 1817

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: James Tilly
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: -
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 14 years

Crime: Receiving stolen property
Convicted at: Bristol Quarter Session
Sentence term: 14 years
Ship: Lord Eldon
Departure date: April, 1817
Arrival date: 30th September, 1817
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 219 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 325 (164); Oxford University and City Herald - Saturday 25 January 1817, p2.
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Robin Sharkey on 5th October, 2018 wrote:

James Tilly was sentenced to 14 years’ transportation in the January 1817 Bristol Quarter Sessions for receiving stolen goods. His wife was then immediately preyed on by a swindler:

“The wife of James Tilly, who was tried at the Bristol Quarter Sessions, on Tuesday sen’nihght, for receiving stolen goods, keeps a small shop in Thunderbolt St, Bristol.
  “When the verdict was pronounced against her husband, a man who was present in court, immediately proceeded to the poor woman’s house and told her that Tilly had been acquitted and wanted only 8 [shillings] to pay his fees and he would be discharged. Overjoyed at the news she gave the fellow 8 shillings with which he decamped.
    “In a few minutes afterwards she discovered that she had been the dupe of an artful impostor, her husband having been found guilty and sentenced to fourteen years’ transportation.” (Oxford University and City Herald - Saturday 25 January 1817, p2.)
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Convict Changes History

Robin Sharkey on 5th October, 2018 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 325 (164); Oxford University and City Herald - Saturday 25 January 1817, p2. (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piec

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au