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George Troth

George Troth, one of 236 convicts transported on the Mangles, 08 December 1832

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: George Troth
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1815
Occupation: Bricklayer
Date of Death: 20th February, 1896
Age: 81 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 60 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 14 years

Crime: Larceny
Convicted at: Warwick Assizes
Sentence term: 14 years
Ship: Mangles
Departure date: 8th December, 1832
Arrival date: 17th April, 1833
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 235 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/8, Page Number 499 (250)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Ron Garbutt on 18th January, 2020 wrote:

From: Nick & Beryl Hollingworth < nickb2>


(no primary sources provided)

George Troth was born 15.6.1815 in Birmingham. Oral history states he was born Thompson & when his father died when he was about 18 months old his mother married a Troth & changed his name.
He was convicted at the Warwick Assizes in 1833 of stealing silver money the property of John Biggs sentence Death commuted to 14 years. Arrived in Australia 1833 on the “Mangles 6” was assigned to Cpt Maxwell Madras army. in the district of Bathurst. I think that he may be the John Maxwell who had property near Hartley. Lost George until his marriage in 1848 to Elizabeth Cross. Did not appear on the 1837 muster. TOL 1841 gave no information

Ron Garbutt on 18th January, 2020 wrote:

Details for the ship Mangles (6) (1833)
Ship Name: Mangles (6) 
Rig Type: S.
Built: Bengal
Build Year: 1802
Size (tons): 594
Voyage Details
Master: William Carr
Surgeon: James Rutherford
Sailed: 14 December 1832
From: London
Arrived: 19 April 1833
Port: PJ
Route: Direct
Days Travel: 126
Convicts Landed: 235 males & 0 female convicts

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

Abt.1815. Birth in Birmingham.

Sources.
Detail
State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/8, Page Number 499 (250)
Source Information
Title
Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Detail
Compiler: Griffith Genealogical and Historical Society Inc; Collection Title: Griffith G and HS Cemetery Records
Source Information
Title
Australia Cemetery Index, 1808-2007
Author
Ancestry.com

Detail
Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 2
Edit Source
Source Information
Title
UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

1831. Tried and convicted. Warwick Midsummer Assizes. Warwickshire, England. Found guilty of larceny. Sentenced to 3 months gaol and whipping.

Source.
Detail
Class: HO 27; Piece: 42; Page: 312
Source Information
Title
England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

1832. Tried and convicted. Warwick Lent Assizes. Warwickshire, England. Found guilty of larceny in a dwelling house. Sentenced to death. Changed to transportation for 14 years.

Source.
Detail
Class: HO 27; Piece: 44; Page: 334
Source Information
Title
England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

10 May 1832. Sent to prison hulk Euryalus, moored at Chatham, to await transportation.

Source.
Detail
Home Office: Convict Prison Hulks: Registers and Letter Books; Class: HO9; Piece: 2
Source Information
Title
UK, Prison Hulk Registers and Letter Books, 1802-1849
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

Notes on The Hulk Euryalus.
The HMS Euryalus, having taken part in the Battle of Trafalgar and briefly serving as Admiral Collingwood’s flagship, was decommissioned in 1825 and converted into a prison hulk for boys on the River Thames at Chatham. In 1847 the ship was moved to Gibralter, and was sold for breaking up in 1860. (1)
“At the end of 1825 the boys were transferred to a new prison hulk, the Euryalus, an ex-frigate of the Trafalgar fleet, moored at Chatham. Over the twenty years that these hulks serviced juveniles, about 2,500 boys of fourteen and under passed through them. There were also considerable numbers of older boys both in the juvenile hulks and distributed amongst the other prison hulks. Conditions on the Euryalus were frequently the subject of concern. Certainly by the 1830s if not before, damning comment can be found in the various parliamentary Select Committees. From the Euryalus boys were transported both to New South Wales and to Van Diemen’s Land.

The Bellerophon was reserved for juveniles from mid-1824 until the end of 1825 when they were transferred to the Euryalus hulk, said to be ‘specially fitted for them’. In reality the hulk was beset by problems and attendant controversy for much of the decade or so that it was in use. For instance, in 1831 Thomas Wontner launched a blistering attack on the Euryalus in his book, Old Bailey Experience, prosaically pointing out that, ‘If there be any regular and established schools for teaching crime, the ship Euryalus is the place’.” (2)

In addition,

“The hulks, as we have seen, epitomised the great dread of ‘contagion’ and ‘contamination’. In 1835, W. A. Miles received information from the juvenile penal settlement in Van Diemen’s Land, Point Puer, indicating that the boys’ tenure in the Euryalus had aggravated their criminal tendencies: ‘however criminal they might have been before their Commitments, he seriously believes that previous to their Imprisonment in that accursed Hulk… they were comparatively innocent’. (3)

Sources.
(1) Wikipedia. “List of British prison hulks” Last modified on 27 April 2016.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_prison_hulks

(2) Wonter, T., Old Bailey Experience: Criminal jurisprudence and the Actual Working of our Penal Code of Laws… London, James Fraser, 1831.

(3) Miles, W. A., Poverty, Mendicity and Crime, London, Shaw and Sons, 1839.

(4) Shore, Heather, “From courthouse to convict-ship to colony: the Euraylus [sic] boys in the 1830s”. Colonial Places, Convict Spaces: penal transportation in global context, c. 1600-1940. Conference which was hosted by The Department of Economic & Social History, University of Leicester. 9-10 December 1999.

(5) Shore, Heather, “Transportation, penal ideology and the experience of juvenile offenders in England and Australia in the early nineteenth century,” pp. 81-102. Article in Crime, History & Societies VOL. 6, N°2 | 2002 accessed 4 June 2016 https://chs.revues.org/416(link is external)

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

8 Dec 1832. Departure on convict ship Mangles.

Sources.
Detail
State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/8, Page Number 499 (250)
Source Information
Title
Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Detail
Class: HO 11; Piece: 8
Source Information
Title
Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, 1791-1868
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

Convict Ship Mangles 1833

Embarked: 236 men
Voyage: 126 days
Deaths: 1 (at Sheerness)
Surgeons Journal: yes
Captain William Carr
Surgeon Superintendent James Rutherford

This was the sixth voyage of the Mangles bringing convicts to Australia.

The prisoners were tried or court-maritalled in the following cities and counties in England, Scotland and Wales - Middlesex, Gloucester, York, Surrey, Nottingham, Worcester, Somerset, Stafford, Chester, Lancaster, Bucks, Oxford, Sussex, Essex, Derby, Warwick, Bristol, Lincoln, Cambridge, Leicester, Salop, Bedford, London, Bristol, Kent, Tewkesbury, Devon, Perth, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Stirling, Jedburgh, Inverary, Monmouth, Flint, Glamorgan, Brecon, Demerary, Castle Rushen and Kings Mews CM.

Surgeon James Rutherford
James Rutherford kept a Medical Journal from 8 November 1832 to 9 May 1833…..

Of 236 convicts originally embarked eighty were received at Woolwich and 156 at Sheerness. I did not notice anything peculiar in their state of health or anything in their general condition except that some of them seemed to feel the want of flannels which they said they had been long accustomed to wear. [1]

There was an outbreak of cholera on board as well as scurvy. James Rutherford remarked on a symptom of scurvy he called spontaneous salivation which he had read about, and which he thought may have also affect those who engaged in religious fasting. He treated this symptom using a mixture of nitras potassa dissolved in equal parts of vinegar and lime juice…

Sources.
References
[1] Journal of James Rutherford. Ancestry.com. UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-1857 Medical Journal of James Rutherford on the voyage of the Mangles in 1833. Original data: The National Archives. Kew, Richmond, Surrey.

[2] Bateson, Charles, Library of Australian History (1983). The Convict Ships, 1787-1868 (Australian ed). Library of Australian History, Sydney pp.350-51.

[3] Convict Indents. Ancestry.com. State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12188; Item: [4/4017]; Microfiche: 685

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

Convict Ship Mangles 1833 (continued)

(from Free Settler or Felon website:
Convict Ship Mangles 1833://www.jenwilletts.com/convict_ship_mangles_1833.htm)

A Visitor’s Impression
Thomas Rolph gave the following account of his visit to a convict ship in November 1832 .......

We were detained some time at anchor, opposite Ryde, from the prevalence of adverse winds; the motion of the ship, when at anchor, in a rough sea, is extremely disagreeable. From our detention, an opportunity was afforded me of visiting a Convict ship, then taking in stores at Portsmouth. There were arrangements in her, for conveying two hundred and eighty criminals to New South Wales. The manner in which the ship was fitted up, combined security with comfort. The holds, in which the convicts sleep, were commodious: their allowance of food very liberal, and of the best quality, and every indulgence, consistent with their safety, is extended towards them, if their conduct is orderly and well behaved. The unfortunate creatures were taken on board the ship, during our stay at Portsmouth: they gave three hearty cheers as they left the land of their fathers; most of them for ever. The government, willing to show them every kindness, ordered the ship to remain off land for ten or twelve days, in order that they may communicate with their friends….... A brief account, together with observations, made during a visit in the West ... By Thomas Rolph

Military Guard
The Guard consisted of 29 rank and file, 7 women and 8 children attached to the 21st Fusiliers. Passengers. Captain Brand, 16th regiment, Mrs. Brand and assistant Surgeon Smith of the 17th regiment.

Departure
The Mangles sailed from London on 14th December 1832.[2]

Scilly Islands
They put into the Scilly Islands because of bad weather early in the voyage.

Port Jackson
The Mangles arrived in Port Jackson on 19th April 1833.

Convict Muster
The men were mustered on board on 24th April 1833. The indents include name, age, education, religion, marital status, family, native place, trade, offence, when and where tried, sentence, former convictions, and physical description.

Convicts Disembarked
The prisoners were landed on 6 May and escorted to the Prisoners Barracks at Hyde Park

Sources.
[1] Journal of James Rutherford. Ancestry.com. UK, Royal Navy Medical Journals, 1817-1857 Medical Journal of James Rutherford on the voyage of the Mangles in 1833. Original data: The National Archives. Kew, Richmond, Surrey.

[2] Bateson, Charles, Library of Australian History (1983). The Convict Ships, 1787-1868 (Australian ed). Library of Australian History, Sydney pp.350-51.

[3] Convict Indents. Ancestry.com. State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12188; Item: [4/4017]; Microfiche: 685

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

17 April 1833. Arrived in Port Jackson, NSW.

Source.
Detail
State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/8, Page Number 499 (250)
Source Information
Title
Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

1 Aug 1848. Marriage to Elizabeth Ann Cross
(1830–1866) Windsor, New South Wales, Australia.

Source.
Source Information
Title
Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950
Author
Ancestry.com
Publisher
Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

3 April 1841. Granted Ticket of Leave.

Source.
Detail
State Archives NSW; Series: NRS 12202; Item: [4/4150]
Edit Source
Source Information
Title
New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1824-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

1849 - 1860. George and Elizabeth had 5 children.

William Kenneth (1849-1925)
Jane (1851-1939)
Caroline (1855-1952)
Frances (1857-1932)
George Frazer (1860-1934)

Source.
Title
Ancestry Family Trees

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

20 Feb 1896. Death. Marsden Station, New South Wales, Australia.

Source.
Title
Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985
Author
Ancestry.com

Detail
Compiler: Griffith Genealogical and Historical Society Inc; Collection Title: Griffith G and HS Cemetery Records
Edit Source
Source Information
Title
Australia Cemetery Index, 1808-2007
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 wrote:

An Interesting Read.

Transported:
The Stories of 236 Convicts Banished to Australia in 1832 Aboard the Mangles
by Megan Roberts (Author)

On 8 December 1832, the convict transport ship ‘Mangles’ departed from Sheerness with its cargo of 236 convicts bound for New South Wales, none of whom knew what fate had in store for them. The ages of the men and boys spanned from just 13 years-old to 54, and between them they left behind 46 wives and 133 children. Their crimes ranged from horse stealing, to counterfeiting, burglary, mugging, or just stealing apples. They had been sent from all corners of the United Kingdom, and one was even from Guyana in South America. They came from all walks of life: labourers, sailors, tradesmen, soldiers, urchins and craftsmen; and included the educated and the uneducated. Some of them would go on to carve out new lives in Australia, with new families; others would never cease fighting the ‘system’; two would be sent to the gallows, whilst another two would be murdered. Others would leave the colony, either at the end of their sentences or by escaping. This book sets out to tell the stories of how each of them ended up on the ‘Mangles’, and what happened to them after they arrived in New South Wales.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd February, 2020 wrote:

Extract from the book: TRANSPORTED by Megan Roberts

GEORGE TROTH

George Troth was a literate bricklayer from Birmingham who was convicted of burglary and stealing 14 pounds-19 shillings from the house of John Briggs in Birmingham on 24 March 1832 at the Warwick Assizes. It is unclear how old he was. The prison hulk records say 16 years old; the ‘Convict Indents, 1788-1842’ say 20 years old; and the New South Wales prison records say 18 years old.
This was by no means his first offense. In March 1831 George Troth had faced a similar charge in Worcester with two other Birmingham youths. All three were committed to the Worcester County Gaol on remand in August 1830, but only the other two were found guilty at the Assizes and transported as he was discharged. Then in June 1831 he was found guilty by Birmingham Police Magistrates of stealing half a cheese from a shop in Newhall Street and sentenced to three months’ hard labour in the House of correction and to be whipped.
In March 1832 at Warwick Assizes George Troth was sentenced to death, and this was then commuted to transportation for 14 years. A futile appeal was launched by his father, James Troth, also a bricklayer, which was also signed by his victim. Whilst it was unlikely to have ever succeeded, it did not acknowledge the justice of the verdict, something that was normal practice for the time, and instead concentrated on their feelings and those of George troth himself. The petition cited such reasons as; there had been no violence used; George Troth’s youth, and how penitent he was now that he has spent several months in Warwick County Gaol, and that if given his freedom, he would never be in trouble again; and finally if he was transported how much it would hurt the feelings of his family. In early May he was ordered to the boys’ prison hulk the ‘Euryalus’ at Chatham, arriving there on 10 May 1832. The records show that there he had an ulcerated heel. The rest of the time he was reported to be healthy and well behaved. He was transferred to the ‘Mangles’ on 27 November.
After being disembarked in Sydney in May 1833 George Troth was assigned to work for Captain Maxwell. There are no other records for him until 29 November 1840 when he appears in Parramatta Gaol, having been brought in from Penrith to be sent on to Hyde Park Barracks in Sydney on 1 December. Unfortunately, the records do not say why or what for or what happened. He received a Ticket of Leave on 3 April 1841 which allowed him to remain in the district of Bathurst. This was issued following a petition by George Troth himself. There does not appear to have been any Certificate of Freedom or pardon issued.
On 1 August 1848 George Troth married Elizabeth Cross in Windsor. She was born in the Colony in about 1830 and they had five children. She died in Marsden in 1866. George Troth died on 20 February 1896 in Marsden aged 82 years

Convict Changes History

Beverly Anderson-Beazley on 26th September, 2016 made the following changes:

date of birth: 13th January, 1815 (prev. 0000), date of death: 20th February, 1896 (prev. 0000), gender: m

Ron Garbutt on 18th January, 2020 made the following changes:

crime

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1815 (prev. 13th January, 1815)

Ron Garbutt on 31st January, 2020 made the following changes:

occupation

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au