Hi Guest!
Contribute to this record

Abraham Whittaker

Abraham Whittaker, one of 272 convicts transported on the Perseus and Coromandel, January 1802

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Abraham Whittaker
Aliases: Abraham Whitaker
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1755
Occupation: Printer
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 57 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Uttering forged notes
Convicted at: Nottingham Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Perseus and Coromandel
Departure date: January, 1802
Arrival date: 14th August, 1802
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 251 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 309 (154). NSW, Aust.,Registers of COF (NRS 12208)1810-1814
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

Did you find the person you were looking for?

If Abraham Whittaker was the person you were looking for, you may be able to discover more about them by looking at our resources page.

If you have more hunting to do, try a new search or browse the convict records.

Know more about Abraham Whittaker?

Contribute to this record

Community Contributions

Denis Pember on 16th February, 2016 wrote:

With John Atkinson, Abraham was convicted and sentenced to death at the Nottingham Lent Assizes in March 1800 of uttering forged Bank of England 1 pound notes. The Tuesday following their conviction they almost escaped from the lockup by removing the bars of their cell. Abraham had his sentence commuted to life through the intercession of his friends but his accomplice was hanged a month later on 16th April, even though the consensus of opinion was that Whitaker was the ‘principal in the uttering’. He arrived in the colony aboard the ‘Coromandel’. He received a ticket of leave in 1813 and a conditional pardon in Jan 1814.

Denis Pember on 16th February, 2016 wrote:

Abraham lived with Ann Gibbons (Convict, William Pitt, 1806) and had 3 children with her,  between 1808 and 1813.
Ann already had a child, Benjamin Baker, conceived whilst in gaol and born on the voyage.
The relationship between Ann and Abraham must have broken down because she moved on and was with Joseph Smith (Convict, Fortune, 1806) in from about 1814, they married in 1819.

Two of the children of Ann and Abraham did survive;
Mary Ann Whitaker, married William Davis in 1824.
William was the son of William Davis (Convict, Scarborough, 1790) and Amy Burke (Convict, Nile 1801).
Elizabeth Whitaker married Robert Woodbridge (Convict, Adamant, 1821) in 1829.

Grant Woodbridge on 8th June, 2017 wrote:

I believe this death date is incorrect. there is no record of Abraham Whittaker dying in that year on NSWBDM, or any near by, Or known by a different name. for example the only Whittaker died in 1844 was an Edward. Given that when his daughter died in 1874 the newspapers said, “daughter of late Abraham Whittaker of King and York Streets, Sydney” It is extremely unlikely he was an Edward Whittaker in 1844.

Iris Dunne on 8th June, 2017 wrote:

Tried: 13 March 1800
Trade: Cotton Printer as per NSW Certificate of Freedom
COF: 31 January 1814

Convict Changes History

Denis Pember on 16th February, 2016 made the following changes:

alias1: Abraham Whitaker, date of birth: 1755 (prev. 0000), date of death: 1844 (prev. 0000), gender: m, crime

Iris Dunne on 8th June, 2017 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 309 (154). NSW, Aust.,Registers of COF (NRS 12208)1810-1814 (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1,

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au