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Mary Bell

Mary Bell, one of 110 convicts transported on the Northampton, December 1814

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Mary Bell
Aliases: none
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1795
Occupation: Servant
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Grand larceny
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Northampton
Departure date: December, 1814
Arrival date: 18th June, 1815
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 109 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 192; Records of eth Old bailey online
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Robin Sharkey on 22nd October, 2016 wrote:

Mary Bell aged 19 was transported for 7 years on “Northampton’ for stealing some fabric and a dress from her employer. Tried at Th e Old Bailey on 20th April 1814.

OLD BAILEY TRIA:L:
“386. MARY BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , two gowns, value 4 s. and seven yards and a half of cambric, value 19 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Bloodgood Hough .

“ISABELLA HOUGH. My husband’s name is Joseph Bloodgood Hough ; he is a captain . I live in Wellclose-square.  The prisoner was my servant. I did not miss the articles until the prisoner was gone a week. The prisoner left me on the 10th of February; she went away before I was up in the morning, and took her box away. Some few days after she left me I missed the cambric. I did not miss any thing else until after she was taken in custody; I opened her box; I found in it a gown belonging to my daughter.
“JOHN GRIFFITHS : On the 13th of April, I, in company with Hall, a fellow officer, and the prosecutrix, went to the prisoner’s lodgings, No. 5, Anthony-street, St. George’s; my fellow officer saw her in the yard and brought her up stairs; she had then a gown of Mrs. Hough’s on her back; Hall took it off. I unlocked her box, and found this gown in it, and the duplicate of the cambric pledged at Mr. Castle’s, Shadwell.

“JOHN AYRETON. I live with Mr. Castle, pawnbroker. I produce a piece of cambric; the prisoner pawned it on the 28th of February; I lent her ten shillings on it.
JOHN HALL. I found the prisoner in the yard, and on her back was this gown. When I brought her up stairs, the prosecutrix owned it to be her property.
Prosecutrix. One gown and the cambric is my property, and the other gown is my daughter’s.

“Prisoner’s Defence. The key was in my box; whether it was put in by mistake I do not know.
GUILTY, aged 19.
Transported for Seven Years .
First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.”

Convict Changes History

Robin Sharkey on 22nd October, 2016 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 192; Records of eth Old bailey online (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 192), date

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au