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Mary Burke

Mary Burke, one of 131 convicts transported on the Indispensible, October 1795

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Mary Burke
Aliases: none
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1775
Occupation: -
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 60 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Larceny
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Indispensible
Departure date: October, 1795
Arrival date: 30th April, 1796
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 131 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 205 (103)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Ron Garbutt on 18th January, 2020 wrote:

Details for the ship Indispensable (1796)
Ship Name: Indispensable
Rig Type: S.
Built:
Build Year: 1791
Size (tons): 351
Voyage Details
Master: Wilkinson
Surgeon:
Sailed: October 1795
From: England
Arrived: 30 April 1796
Port: PJ
Route: Rio
Days Travel:
Convicts Landed: 0 males & 131 female convicts
Notes: HO records list the ship name as Indispensible

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

Abt.1777

No source found.

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

16 Jul 1794. Trial and sentence. Middlesex Gaol Delivery.
Sentenced to transportation for 7 years

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

Sources for Trial and sentence.

Detail
Class: HO 11; Piece: 1
Source Information
Title
Australian Convict Transportation Registers – Other Fleets & Ships, 1791-1868
Author
Ancestry.com

Detail
State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 205 (103)
Source Information
Title
Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

Oct 1795. Departure aboard convict ship Indispensible.

The Historical Records of NSW record the Indispensable departing Deptford on 22 October 1795. Other sources have a final departure date from England on 11 November 1795.

Sources.

State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 205 (103)
Source Information
Ancestry.com. Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867 [database on-line]. Lehi, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2018.
Original data:
Australia Convict Records Index, 1787-1867. State Library of Queensland, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. https://convictrecords.com.au/: accessed Sep 2017

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

30 Apr 1796. Arrival Port Jackson, New South Wales.

One hundred and thirty-one prisoners arrived in Port Jackson on 30 April 1796, two women having died on the voyage out. The Indispensable brought enough provisions for the women for nine months after arrival. The Indispensable also brought out an assortment of articles suitable of weaving into course cloth.

Sources.
Historical Records of NSW, Vol. III (Hunter)

Detail
State Library of Queensland; South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/1, Page Number 205 (103)
Source Information
Title
Web: Australia, Convict Records Index, 1787-1867
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 1st February, 2020 wrote:

05 Mar 1797. Marriage to Edward Riley (1760–1821.
Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Source.

Title
Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950
Author
Ancestry.com

Ron Garbutt on 7th March, 2020 wrote:

MARY BURKE, HANNAH ROPER.
Violent Theft: robbery, Miscellaneous: perverting justice.
16th July 1794
Old Bailey Proceedings Online (http://www.oldbaileyonline.org, version 8.0, 07 March 2020), July 1794, trial of MARY BURKE HANNAH ROPER (t17940716-7).

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t17940716-7&div=t17940716-7&terms=mary_burke#highlight

389. MARY BURKE was indicted for making an assault on Christian Anderson , in the dwelling house of Margaret Wood, spinster, on the 5th of July , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, twenty-two guineas and ten shillings and

See originalClick to see original
six-pence, in monies numbered, his property ; and
HANNAH ROPER was indicted for that she, well knowing the said Mary Burke to have committed such felony, did her, the said Mary Burke , feloniously receive, harbout and maintain .

CHRISTIAN ANDERSON sworn.

I was in New Gravel lane , last Saturday, seven days ago, it was almost ten o’clock, I was going to my lodging house there, when I came into the street, the woman, Mary Burke, came out, and took off my hat from my head, and ran into the house, so I came after her and asked for my hat, so she ran out and locked the door, and I was in the room, it was a little room; it was in the night, I could not see what sort of a room; I had got two and twenty guineas in my pocket, in gold, I took it out and tied it in my handkerchief, I was frightened when I found I was in the house.

Q. Where was the handkerchief at that time? - I got it in my hand.

Q. How came you to take it out of your pocket? - She locked the door, and I did not know for what; she then came into the room again, and snatched the handkerchief out of my hand, and ran out.

Q. How came she to know that this money was in this handkerchief, or in your hand? - I cannot tell that, I don’t know if she see it.

Q. Was there any light in the room? - No, I could not tell where I was; she got a light in her hand when she came in the second time, and I was on the floor of the ground when she took the money from me; she went out, and I went after her into another woman’s house.

Q. After she had snatched the money out of your hand, in the handkerchief, where did she go? - That woman, Hannah Roper, and another woman along with her, came and took her out of doors; they catched her by the arms.

Q. Were they in the house? - Yes, they were in the fore room, on the same floor. When she snatched the money out of my hand, she went in where these two other women were; I went to her there, and catched hold of her there, and catched hold of my handkerchief, and she had the money then in her hand; she had taken it out of the handkerchief; I found nothing in it but the half guinea, silver money, which tumbled on the ground; then that woman, Roper, and some other woman put her out of the house, and an old woman catched hold of me, and said, stop young man, you shall have your money.

Q. I don’t understand your taking your money out of your pocket and putting it into your handkerchief? - I think I could keep it faster in my handkerchief than in my pocket.

Q. What became of her afterwards? - I came into the street and called the watch, when he called ten o’clock, and I went back to that same house where I had been, and the door was locked, and I went and asked for the girl that had got my money, of the old woman that took me by the jacket.

Q. What became of Mary Broke after this? Where did she go? - I don’t know where she went; the officer found her, I don’t know where; I did not get any of my money back again.

Q. Had you been drinking? - Oh, no. I came from on board, and my captain he paid me my money at half past eight, and I went to Limehouse to pay two or three pounds for clothes.

Prisoner Burks. He came to me very much in liquor.

ROBERT HALL sworn.

I was informed on Sunday morning

See originalClick to see original
that this man had been robbed? I went to the house and there was Peggy Thompson, the mistress of the house, and this Hannah Roper , and this Hannah Roper said, that she saw half a guinea full on the ground, and they took us to find her that robbed the man; but we did not find her then.
PETER MAYNE sworn.

I apprehended the prisoner Burke the night following; I searched her, but found no money on her, only a few shillings.

Prisoner Burke. This man came to me quite in liquor, and I was rather in liquor myself; I was sitting at the door, and he came to me and asked me whether I would go to bed with him? I told him I would make the agreement, as it was late at night. I went with him backwards into the room, and he gave me four shillings out of his handkerchief; I gave the woman of the house one shilling for the bed; with that I went to bed with him, and I went to sleep; and I awaked, and he wanted to use me in a very violent manner indeed, which was inexpressible; and he said if I would not, he would kick me out of bed; accordingly he gave me a kick in the small of my back, and I got out of bed in my smock, saving your presence, my lord; and then he said he would have his money back; accordingly he got up and put on his clothes, and went away; and I went to bed in the same room; in the morning I got up and went towards Stepney, and I met him, and he said, for a b-dy whore, he would have his revenge on me. He has been seen by several solks sporting his money about; and he said he had lost six guineas before he came to me, and he was very groggy in liquor, and he wanted to use me very indecent.

Court to Prosecutor. Is it true that you went to bed with this woman? - No.

Prisoner Burke. Before he would take me up, he said he would swear to a mark on my breast, which he saw when I was undrested.

ELEANOR BRYAN sworn.

Q. Was you on Saturday seven night at this house, in Gravel-lane, where Mary Burke was? - I was in a house in Gravel-lane.

Q. Was it Peggy Thompson ‘s house? - I cannot tell whether I was there or not.

Prisoner Burke. This woman said that she saw this man in New Gravel-lane, smoaking his pipe, and giving his money about among the women; she see him spending his money among the women.

Witness. I see him drop two guineas and some halfpence, and two women picked the money up, and called after him, and I don’t know whether they gave them to him or not; but that happened as I was going by.

EDMUND BURKE sworn.

I live in Rosemary-lane; I know nothing of this transaction; an officer had the woman of the house in custody, and discharged her after.

Prisoner Burke. It was the other woman that committed the robbery, and they dragged me out in my shift afterwards, and promised me my share of it, but I never had a farthing.

Mary Burke , GUILTY ,

Of the larceny only (Aged 19.)

Transported for seven years .

Hannah Roper, Not GUILTY .

Tried by the first Middlesex Jury before

Mr. Justice LAWRENCE.

Convict Changes History

Ron Garbutt on 7th March, 2020 made the following changes:

crime

Ron Garbutt on 7th March, 2020 made the following changes:

gender: f

Ron Garbutt on 7th March, 2020 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1775 (prev. 0000)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au