Hi Guest!
Contribute to this record

Thomas Dooley

Thomas Dooley, one of 174 convicts transported on the Fanny, 25 August 1815

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Thomas Dooley
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1793
Occupation: -
Date of Death: 4th November, 1816
Age: 23 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: -
Convicted at: Surrey Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Fanny
Departure date: 25th August, 1815
Arrival date: 18th January, 1816
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 173 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 228 State Records of NSW , 1 Nov 1816, COD405A, citation 2703 [SZ776A] p277. Sydney Gazette 2 Nov and 9 Nov 1816.
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

Did you find the person you were looking for?

If Thomas Dooley was the person you were looking for, you may be able to discover more about them by looking at our resources page.

If you have more hunting to do, try a new search or browse the convict records.

Know more about Thomas Dooley?

Contribute to this record

Community Contributions

Robin Sharkey on 28th February, 2015 wrote:

Thomas Dooley was only 22 years old when guilty in Surry and given life transportation.  He was a native of Kildare.
Tall-ish at 5ft 10 inches, black hair, grey eyes and of pale complexion.

On arrival he was assigned to the farm of John Redmond on arrival on “Fanny” in January 1816.  Also at the farm in 1816 was Michael Ryan, (hard to tell which of the many this was).

Tom was hanged before the year was out.
He happily went along on an expedition on Saturday 30th Sept 1816 to rob the farm of John Miller -  led by Colin Hunter, who, with George Fuller, had decided to call in to Redmond’s Farm on the way and see if Michael Ryan and Dooley would like to assist.

Dooley apparently had a taste for breaking the law; he didn’t tell them to go away and just go to the pub instead.

When there at Miller’s farm, Colin Hunter went in first, with the others close behind, but shot dead John Miller as he rose from his chair in front of the fireplace with his wife and four children in the room.  They all four then proceeded with the plan to rob the house. This only aggravated their circumstances when they were brought to trial

1 November 1816 Trial at Criminal Court.  George Fuller gave evidence for the Crown, thereby ensuring his own immunity and continued existence in the world. The other four were found guilty and sentenced to hang in the usual way, on the following Monday.

Three days later, on Monday 4th November, Tom Dooley spent the time on the way to his execution in prayer with his co-accused thereby earning the approval of the Sydney Gazette for his appropriate demeanour.  His body, and those of the others, was given over for dissection to the Colonial Surgeons.

Convict Changes History

Robin Sharkey on 28th February, 2015 made the following changes:

source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 87, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 228 State Records of NSW , 1 Nov 1816, COD405A, citation 2703 [SZ776A] p277. Sydney Gazette 2 Nov and 9 Nov 1816. (prev. Australian Joint Copying Proj

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au