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Ellis Wallis

Ellis Wallis, one of 122 convicts transported on the Broxbournebury, January 1814

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Ellis Wallis
Aliases: Alice
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1791
Occupation: Servant
Date of Death: 1829
Age: 38 years

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 53 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Larceny
Convicted at: Middlesex Gaol Delivery
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Broxbournebury
Departure date: January, 1814
Arrival date: 28th July, 1814
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 124 other convicts

References

Primary source: Old Bailey, online. England Criminal Registers HO26/18, page 113. Ancestry. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 147 (75)
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Iris Dunne on 9th August, 2019 wrote:

The Proceedings of the Old Bailey
Theft: shoplifting
568. ELLIS WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , fifty yards of ribbon, value 55 s. the property of Richard Green , senior, Richard Green , junior, and Charles Green , privately, in their shop .

CHARLES GREEN . My partners are Richard Green, senior, and Richard Green, junior. Our shop is No. 6, Mary-le-bone Street, Golden-square . We are haberdasher s. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was coming from the warehouse. I looked through the window to see if they were busy in the shop. I saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in her hand, which she then drew towards her pocket. I went down stairs, and mentioned the circumstance to my father; and when the prisoner was going out of the shop, I stopped her. I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might know what she had got. She went readily with me. I then called Mr. Wright, to see what she had taken. She took from her pocket then a piece of ribbon, which is in the possession of the constable. The ribbon was on a block, about eighteen yards. I then left her in the care of Wright, while I went and consuited what I should do with her. I know no more of my own knowledge.

Q. Who were the persons serving in the shop - A. Wright and Robinson.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. James’s , Westminster.

- ROBINSON. Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master’s shop - A. No; I was there serving behind the counter. There were a drawer of ribbons, from which she took out a piece of ribbon, from which I cut her off two yards of ribbon, and she paid me for it. She turned to go out. We did not suspect that she had taken any thing.
JOHN WRIGHT . Q. You are a shopman in this shop, are you - A. Yes. I was called into the back room. I saw nothing of the transaction until I was called in. Mr. Green then told her, that she had something in her pocket of his. She pulled a piece of ribbon out of her pocket, and gave it me; that piece contained eight yards. Mr. Green then left the room. The prisoner said, she hoped he would forgive her. I then asked her, if she had any more ribbon. She said, she had not any more. I told her to sit down. She had not sat down above four or five minutes, before I heard something fall upon the floor, immediately under her. I looked round, and saw it was a piece of ribbon. I picked it up, and there was nothing else on the floor. That was on the block, the same as the other. There were fifteen or sixteen yards of it. I asked her, if that was all. She said, yes. I watched her close. Another piece fell from her that was on the block. I suppose there is thirteen or fourteen yards in that piece. Mr. Green came into the room, and I went for the officer. He came and took charge of her.

Q. What would be the worth of this quantity of ribbon - A. Thirty shillings or upwards.

Prisoner’s Defence. My Lord, I humbly implore you to extend your mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude; not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?div=t18120701-50

Criminal Registers: aged 21, Trial 4 July 1812, Offence Larceny

Transportation Registers, 1810-1817, Tried 1 July 1812, aged 21

Previously transported on ship Emu 1812

Beth Kebblewhite on 29th September, 2019 wrote:

WALLIS, Alice (or Ellis at her trial) (c1790-1829)
Tried - 1 July 1812 Middlesex (Old Bailey)
Alice appeared before the Old Bailey Court charged with shoplifting 50 yards of ribbon from the haberdasher’s shop belonging to the Green family. The shop was situated at 6 Mary-le- bone Street, Golden Square and Alice said in her defence: “I humbly implore you to extend mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude: not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.” Alice, then aged about 21, a fustian cutter by trade (fustian was coarse material such as corduroy), was found guilty and sentenced to 7 years transportation to New South Wales. She was first sent to the Colony in 1812 on the Emu and finally arrived in Sydney in 1814 on the Broxbornebury.

BC: 1790
Sentenced: 01/07/1812 Middlesex [see trial record below] to 7 years transportation
Crime: Larceny
Previous Occupation: Fustian cutter
Age on Convict Indent: 24
1812 - ELLIS WALLIS, Theft > shoplifting, 1st July 1812.
568. ELLIS WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June, fifty yards of ribbon, value 55 s. the property of Richard Green, senior, Richard Green, junior, and Charles Green, privately, in their shop.
CHARLES GREEN. My partners are Richard Green, senior, and Richard Green, junior. Our shop is No. 6, Mary-le-bone Street, Golden-square. We are haberdashers. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was coming from the warehouse. I looked through the window to see if they were busy in the shop. I saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in her hand, which she then drew towards her pocket. I went down stairs, and mentioned the circumstance to my father; and when the prisoner was going out of the shop, I stopped her. I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might know what she had got. She went readily with me. I then called Mr. Wright, to see what she had taken. She took from her pocket then a piece of ribbon, which is in the possession of the constable. The ribbon was on a block, about eighteen yards. I then left her in the care of Wright, while I went and consuited what I should do with her. I know no more of my own knowledge.
Q. Who were the persons serving in the shop - A. Wright and Robinson.
Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. James’s, Westminster.
ROBINSON. Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master’s shop - A. No; I was there serving behind the counter. There were a drawer of ribbons, from which she took out a piece of ribbon, from which I cut her off two yards of ribbon, and she paid me for it. She turned to go out. We did not suspect that she had taken any thing.
JOHN WRIGHT. Q. You are a shopman in this shop, are you - A. Yes. I was called into the back room. I saw nothing of the transaction until I was called in. Mr. Green then told her, that she had something in her pocket of his. She pulled a piece of ribbon out of her pocket, and gave it me; that piece contained eight yards. Mr. Green then left the room. The prisoner said, she hoped he would forgive her. I then asked her, if she had any more ribbon. She said, she had not any more. I told her to sit down. She had not sat down above four or five minutes, before I heard something fall upon the floor, immediately under her. I looked round, and saw it was a piece of ribbon. I picked it up, and there was nothing else on the floor. That was on the block, the same as the other. There were fifteen or sixteen yards of it. I asked her, if that was all. She said, yes. I watched her close. Another piece fell from her that was on the block. I suppose there is thirteen or fourteen yards in that piece. Mr. Green came into the room, and I went for the officer. He came and took charge of her.
Q. What would be the worth of this quantity of ribbon - A. Thirty shillings or upwards.
Prisoner’s Defence. My Lord, I humbly implore you to extend your mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude; not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.
GUILTY, aged 21.
Transported for Seven Years.
Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.
(Source: Old Bailey on-line website http://www.oldbaileyonline.org)
ALSO ON SHIP EMU IN 1812
Ticket of Leave 1109; Certificate of Freedom 2291 (indent)
1814 Muster:
Alice Wallace (?), con, Broxbornebury, off stores, single, Sydney (6950)
1819, 7 & 8 June - Alice asked for permission to marry Benjamin Dicken (per ship Morley 1). Both were listed as prisoners. (Source: SRNSW Col Sec Papers, Letters Received: Reel 6006; 4/3500 p141)
1819 - Alice Wallis, widow & Benjamin Dicken (sic), carpenter bachelor, both of this parish, were married by banns on 29 June 1819 at St Philips Church Sydney by Rev William Cowper. Benjamin signed his name & Alice X. Witnesses were John Bradney & Ann Whittaker. (Benjamin Dicken, aged 28, Bachelor, Abode: Sydney, Carpenter, Signed; & Alice Wallis, aged 28, Widow, Abode: Sydney, Signed X; married 28 Jun 1819 Church, registered St Philips Church of England Sydney by Banns by William Cowper; Witness: John Bradney, Signed; Witness: Ann Whitiker, Signed. Source: St Philip’s Church of England, Sydney NSW: Church Register - Marriages; ML ref: Reel SAG 90 & V1819-33-8) [Note: No record of Benjamin Dicken(s) on ship Morley’s convict indent, searched trips 1-3]
1822 Muster:
Alice WALLACE (?), FBS, Broxbornebury, 7 years, householder, Sydney (A21724)
1823-25 Muster:
Alice WALLIS, FS, Broxbornebury, 7 years, wife of Ben Dickens, Sydney (44055)
1828 Census:
Alice DICKENS, aged 40, FS, Broxbornebury, *(D0914) & spouse -
Benjamin DICKINS, aged 45, TL, Morley 1 1817, 14 years, prot, householder, Goulburn St Sydney *(D0913)
Appendix – Alice/Allise Dickens or Alice/Allice Wallace. Also says Benjamin died Nov 1829 & Alice died Sept that year.
1829 - Alice Dickens aged 40, of Goulburn Sydney, came per ship Broxbornebury, her husband a carpenter, died in Sept 1829 & was buried on 3 Sept at St James Sydney by Rev Richard Hill. (Alice Dickins; Abode: Goulburn Street [Sydney]; Died [1829] [Sydney], Aged: 40; Buried 3 Sep 1829 [Sydney] by [Reverend] Richard Hill; Registered at St James’ Church of England Sydney, Arrived per Broxbornebury; [Her] Husband [Dickins], Carpenter. Source: St James’ Church of England, Sydney NSW: Church Register - Burials; ML ref: Reel SAG 61; Vol Entry# 443 & V1829-1301-132 or V1829-8653-2C at St Peters Campbelltown?) (Also listed on SRNSW Convict Death Index 1828-1879, died Sydney)
1829 - Benjamin Dickens, aged 36, of Sussex St, dealer in cedar & came per ship Morley 1, was buried on 12 Nov 1829. The service was held at St James by Rev Hill. (Benjamin Dickins, Dealer in Cedar; Abode: Sussex Street [Sydney]; Died [1829] [Sydney], Aged: 36, Cause: Drowned; Buried 12 Nov 1829 [Sydney] by [Reverend] Richard Hill; Registered at St James’ Church of England Sydney, Arrived per Morley (1); Additional information: Verdict of Coroner’s jury - Accidentally drowned. Source: St James’ Church of England, Sydney NSW: Church Register - Burials; ML ref: Reel SAG 61; Vol Entry# 481 & V1829-8761-2C) [Also same person & date on Convict Death Register]
1829- “CORONER’S INQUEST. Major Smeatham, Coroner for Sydney, held an inquest on Wednesday at the sign of the Settlers Arms, Cockle Bay on the body of Mr Benjamin Dickens who was drowned the day before in the evening, about six o’clock, whilst bathing, immediately opposite the above public house. The Jury after every attention to the circumstances, brought in a verdict of—“the deceased was accidentally drowned, while bathing, in consequence of getting entangled among some floating planks.”” (Source: The Australian, 13/11/1829, p3)

From the book “Journey to a New Life…” the story of the ships Emu & Broxbornebury by Elizabeth Hook (3rd ed. 2014). I am the author & can be contacted on hookey5609@yahoo.com.au for further info

Convict Changes History

Iris Dunne on 9th August, 2019 made the following changes:

source: Old Bailey, online. England Criminal Registers HO26/18, page 113. Ancestry. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/2, Page Number 147 (75) (prev. Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class

Beth Kebblewhite on 29th September, 2019 made the following changes:

alias1: Alice, date of death: 1829 (prev. 0000)

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au