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Ann Wood

Ann Wood, one of 100 convicts transported on the Harmony, 09 September 1828

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Ann Wood
Aliases: Ann Garbett, Anne Garbeth, Ann Garbard, Ann Garwood
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1808
Occupation: Farm servant
Date of Death: 17th December, 1871
Age: 63 years

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 61 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Highway robbery
Convicted at: Stafford Assizes
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Harmony
Departure date: 9th September, 1828
Arrival date: 14th January, 1829
Place of arrival Van Diemen's Land
Passenger manifest Travelled with 100 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 89, Class and Piece Number HO11/6, Page Number 494
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Community Contributions

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Aliases are listed in the Female Convicts in Van Diemen’s Land Database. This database is accessed online through The Female Convicts’ Research Centre. According to this database -
Garbard appears on death record
Garbett is her married name
Garbeth appears on several of her children’s birth registrations

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls.
Many of the details for Ann Wood listed here appear in Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls. The story of the 1600 convict women sent to Van Diemen’s Land from 1803 to 1829. Author: Phillip Tardif. Published as a book in 1990 and re-released as a CD in 2006.
Another important source is the Archive Office of Tasmania where much of the same information is available. Several documents provided as copies by the Archive Office are:
Ann Wood Convict Record CON 18-24
Ann Wood Convict Record 42-1
Ann Wood Convict Record CON 40-9
The other principal source of information is The Female Convicts in Van Diemen’s Land Database which can be accessed on The Female Convicts’ Research Centre website.
http://femaleconvicts.org.au/index.php/research/database
Original source citations are provided where known.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood
Harmony
Police number 127
Convicted at Stafford Assizes
Conviction date and sentence: 13 March 1828. Life (Death recorded)
Transported for Highway Robbery
Gaol report: Not known before. Good disposition. Single.
Stated this offence: Highway Robbery.
Prosecutor Mr Smith.
Mother at Stafford, Sarah Wood, charwoman. I was last in the service of Mr Galloway, a farmer, at native place Henson, Staffordshire. Single. Protestant.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood - Description
Native Place. Henson (Staffordshire)
Trade. Farm Servant
Literacy. Can read only
Height. 5ft 01/4 in
Age. 21 (1829)
Head. Oval
Hair. Brown
Visage. Oval
Forehead. Perpendicular
Eyebrows. Brown
Eyes. Hazel
Nose. Medium length
Mouth. Medium width
Chin. Medium length
Remarks. Little finger right hand slightly deformed
Source: Archive Office of Tasmania. Document CON 18-24

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Details for the ship Harmony (2) (1829)
Ship Name: Harmony (2) 
Rig Type: S.
Built: St. Johns
Build Year: 1818
Size (tons): 373
Voyage Details
Master: Bennett Ireland
Surgeon: William Clifford
Sailed: 13 September 1828
From: Downs
Arrived: 14 January 1829
Port: VDL
Route:
Days Travel: 123
Convicts Landed: 0 males & 100 female convicts
Notes:
Source:Website http://www.hawkesbury.net.au/claimaconvict/index.php
Original sources:Sources
The National Archives (TNA) : HO 11/6, pp.491-497
Bateson, Charles & Library of Australian History (1983). The convict ships, 1787-1868 (Australian ed). Library of Australian History, Sydney : pp.360-361, 386

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Sources for name, crime, sentence, arrival and residence:
Source Citation
Class: HO 27; Piece: 36; Page: 153
Source Information
Ancestry.com. England & Wales, Criminal Registers, 1791-1892 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009. This collection was indexed by Ancestry World Archives Project contributors.
Original data:
Home Office: Criminal Registers, Middlesex and Home Office: Criminal Registers, England and Wales; Records created or inherited by the Home Office, Ministry of Home Security, and related bodies, Series HO 26 and HO 27; The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.
Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 39
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 5, 19-20, 32-51); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.
Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 48
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 5, 19-20, 32-51); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.
Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 49
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 5, 19-20, 32-51); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.
Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 50
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 5, 19-20, 32-51); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.
Source Citation
Class: HO 10; Piece: 51
Source Information
Ancestry.com. New South Wales and Tasmania, Australia Convict Musters, 1806-1849 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
Original data: Home Office: Settlers and Convicts, New South Wales and Tasmania; (The National Archives Microfilm Publication HO10, Pieces 5, 19-20, 32-51); The National Archives of the UK (TNA), Kew, Surrey, England.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood - Colonial Experiences 1829
1829, February 19: H. J. Emmett. Leaving her Master’s house and quitting the premises in the night of Monday last and last evening without leave. Cell on bread and water 7 days and Crime Class, House of Correction.
1829, July 27: F. Smith. Absenting herself without leave yesterday. Returned to the Female House of Correction.
1829, October 19: Mrs Eldridge. Having a man concealed in the house of her Master after it was locked up for the night. Cell on bread and water 6 days and placed in the Crime Class, House of Correction and afterwards sent to the Interior.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood - Colonial Experiences 1831 - 1833
1831, January 20: Applied to marry Thomas Garbett, free.
1831, March 16: Again applied to marry Thomas Garbett.
1831, June 6: Married Thomas Garbett in Hobart Town.
1832 Muster: Assigned to Mr Degreaves.
1833, May 31: Wife of Garbett. Drunk. Fined 5 shillings.
1833 Muster: Holding a Ticket of Leave.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood - Colonial Experiences 1835 - 1841
1835 Muster: Assigned to Mrs DeGraves
1836, May 30: Garwood. Being in a public house. Reprimanded.
1838, December7: Ticket of Leave.
1840, March 4: TL. Being drunk. Discharged.
1841 Muster: Holding a Ticket of Leave.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Ann Wood - Colonial Experiences 1846 - 1855
1846, January6: Conditional Pardon recommended. Having held a Ticket of Leave above 7 years and a half uninterruptedly and nearly 10 years having elapsed since she was charged with the commission of any offence.
1846, December 8: Pardon (excluding Great Britain and Ireland) approved.
1855, May 30: Hobart Quarter Session. Feloniously receiving a watch, the value of 15 pounds, the property of Edward Freeman. To be imprisoned and kept to hard labour for 3 years.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Another Alias? - Mary Wood / Garbett
On the registration of birth of a female child on 15 May 1841 (RGD 337/1841 Hobart) the mother’s name is listed as Mary

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

Sources for Ann Wood - Colonial Experiences: Notorious Strumpets and Dangerous Girls by Phillip Tardif. Original source citations are listed in this book.

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 wrote:

The Cascades Female Factory.
The Female House of Correction referred to in Ann Wood’s Colonial Experiences was the Cascades Female Factory.
History of the Cascades Female Factory
Built in 1828 and operating until 1856, the Cascades Female Factory became one of Tasmania’s longest running penal institutions. Located outside Hobart the Female Factory was intended to remove the women convicts from the negative influences and temptations of the town, and also to protect society from what was seen as their immorality and corrupting influence. The Factory was located, however, in an area of damp swamp land, which added greatly to the ill health and suffering of the women and children who lived in the prison.

Factory layout
The administrative centre of Cascades Female Factory, Yard 1, accepted its first 100 women in 1828. The yard, formerly a distillery, had been converted into seven walled spaces that included a hospital, nursery, kitchen, store and workrooms and a chapel. Women and children were listed in the convict records, given government clothing and sent into a system of punishment, hard work and religious instruction until they were considered suitable for release as domestic servants.

Yard 3, built in 1845 contained 112 separate cells used for solitary confinement. While male convicts were often punished with flogging, 19th century morality didn’t accept such punishment for women. Yards 1, 2 and 3 contained small cells in which women were punished in solitary confinement. Additional punishments included shaving or cutting hair, the wearing of heavy iron collars, and hard labour.

Yard 4 was opened in 1850 as the specially designed nursery yard. Mothers with their babies stayed in Yard 4 until the babies were weaned at between three and nine months of age. The mothers were then returned to the other yards of the Female Factory and the babies cared for by other weaning mothers. Mothers were sentenced to six months in the Crime Class following the weaning of their children. There was a high infant mortality rate due to the enforced early weaning and unhygienic conditions in the prison. Children who survived to two or three years of age were sent to the orphan schools in Hobart until they were reclaimed by their mothers or able to support themselves.

A wall, built around 1849, separated the matron’s cottage and its garden from the nursery section of Yard 4. The matron lived in the house, which also was used as a gate lodge and included a room for messengers who communicated between the officials in the other yards of the Female Factory.
Changing approaches to punishment and reform
Cascades Female Factory included a range of infrastructure associated with its different functions. The move from convict dormitories in Yard 1 to the solitary cells in Yard 3 built in 1845 is illustrated in the archaeological record. Following the introduction of the probationary period for convicts in Tasmania in 1838, newly arrived women were employed for six months sewing and spinning and taught basic reading and writing. After their six-month probation period, prisoners with a record of good conduct were assigned to settlers as domestic servants. During this probationary period isolation from fellow convicts was enforced to encourage repentance and reform.

A site of great suffering
The Cascade Female Factory quickly became notorious for lack of industry, overcrowding, disease, and high birth and mortality rates. The appalling living conditions and excessively death rate were the subject of numerous inquests and government inquiries. By 1838, 208 children had died within the factory out of the population of 794 children admitted or born in the factory since its opening. This death rate of more than one in four was considerably higher than that in the general Hobart District. Unlike other prisons, children and poor women suffered the most, and not usually as a result of the system of punishments.
Source: Australian Government - Department of the Environment pamphlet: National Heritage Places - Cascades Female Factory

Ron Garbutt on 4th June, 2015 wrote:

Marriage of Ann Wood and Thomas Garbett. According to their marriage certificate (No. 412), they were married on 6 June, 1831 in the Parish of Hobart Town, County of Buckingham by Senior Chaplain, William Bedford. Both made their mark with an X as they could not write.
Source: Marriage Certificate No. 412, in the Archives Office of Tasmania (RGD 1586/1831)

Ron Garbutt on 4th June, 2015 wrote:

Children of Ann Wood and Thomas Garbett.
The following births of children were found in the Registrar General’s records:-
William born 28/7/1835   baptised 16/4/1837 (RGD 7561/1837)
Thomas born 20/1/1837   baptised 16/4/1837 (RGD 7562/1837)
female born 15/5/1841   (RGD 337/1841 Hobart)
male born 6/7/1842     (RGD 908/1842 Hobart)
John born 27/6/1843   (RGD 1547/1843 Hobart)
female born 29/8/1847   (RGD 220/1847 Hobart baptised Mary Ann at St. David’s, Hobart
female born 8/12/1849   (RGD 1990/1849 Hobart)    later named Eliza  

The following deaths were recorded:-
Mary Ann Garbett aged 18 months died 19/1/1841 (accidental) (RGD 577/1841 Hobart)
male Garbett aged 13 days died 19/7/1842 (convulsions) (RGD 1101/1842 Hobart)
Caroline Garbutt aged 6 months died 1/1/1847 (convulsions) (RGD 1288/1847 Hobart)

Descendants’ family trees in Ancestry.com.au also list Sarah (1831 - 1903) and Emily (1832 - 1833) as children of Ann and Thomas. Apparently they were not registered.

Various spellings of the surname were used in these registrations. The most common spelling was Garbett, but others were: Garbeth, Garbatt, Garbutt. Most of the events were registered by Ann Garbett who gave her mark (i.e. she could not sign her name). In the registration of the female in May 1841 (RGD 337/1841) the mother’s name is given as Mary.

Ron Garbutt on 4th June, 2015 wrote:

Residence
On registration documents (birth/death) of her children, Ann Wood listed several different addresses. From 1841 to 1842 her address was given as Cascade, Hobart. In 1843 it was 78 Murray Street, in 1847 it was Brisbane Street, and in 1849 it was given as Hope Island.

Ron Garbutt on 4th June, 2015 wrote:

Death of Ann Wood.
Ann Wood died on 17 December 1871.
Source Information
Ancestry.com. Tasmania, Australia, Index to Death Notices in The Mercury, 1854-1930 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.
Original data: J & F O’Shea and K & A Whitton, comp. “Indexes to Birth, Death and Marriage Notices.” Tasmanian Family History Society Inc., Hobart Branch.

Ron Garbutt on 7th June, 2015 wrote:

Detailed description of life in the female factories, including the Cascades Female Factory can be found at the Convict Female Factories Research Association website.https://sites.google.com/site/convictfemalefactories/life-in-the-factories/life-in-van-diemen-s-land-factories

Convict Changes History

Ron Garbutt on 30th May, 2015 made the following changes:

date of birth: 1808 (prev. 0000), date of death: 17th December, 1871 (prev. 0000), gender: f, occupation, crime

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 made the following changes:

alias1: Ann Garbett, alias2: Anne Garbeth, alias3: Ann Garbard

Ron Garbutt on 3rd June, 2015 made the following changes:

alias4: Ann Garwood

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au