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Henry Wood

Henry Wood, one of 150 convicts transported on the Shipley, November 1821

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Henry Wood
Aliases: none
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1803
Occupation: Labourer
Date of Death: 6th September, 1882
Age: 79 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 54 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Breaking and entering and stealing
Convicted at: Gloucester Quarter Sessions
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Shipley
Departure date: November, 1821
Arrival date: 11th March, 1822
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 149 other convicts

References

Primary source: Australian Joint Copying Project. Microfilm Roll 88, Class and Piece Number HO11/4, Page Number 104 The Biographical Dictionary (Western Australia) Archives Tasmania Database No. 80130 "Western Australian Chronicle and Perth Gazette" No.8, April 9th 1831 Henry Wood, Cert. Freedom No. 28/0650, Item 4/4294, Reel 983, Date of certificate 10 July 1828, Vessel ‘Shipley’. Year 1822? NSW State Records, Colonial Secretary- 1822 The Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser (NSW 1803-1842) Gloucester P
Source description: This record is one of the entries in the British convict transportation registers 1787-1867 database compiled by State Library of Queensland from British Home Office (HO) records which are available on microfilm as part of the Australian Joint Copying Project.

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Anonymous on 14th July, 2011 wrote:

Henry was convicted at Gloucester Quarter Sessions for a term of 7 years on 10 July 1821 for shoplifting.  At the time of his conviction, Henry was a shoemaker. The transport vessel “Shipley” left in November 1821 and arrived in NSW on 11 March 1822, and he was assigned to the Town gang (work gang) at Liverpool on 24 April 1822, and was transferred to the Public Works in 1823.  Henry absconded from George Cox clearing party on 7 December 1824 and a notice was placed in The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803-1842), Thursday 9 December 1824, page 3.

PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE.

THE undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all Constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody:

Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.  5 feet one and half inches, hazel eyes, brown hair, fair complexion, George Cox, Esq, clearing party. (This same notice was repeated again, in the same paper on December 16, 1824.)
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Henry absconded again on 24 August 1826 from the 10 Mile Station clearing party.  A notice was once again placed in The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW: 1803-1842), Saturday 26 August 1826, page 4.
Principal Superintendent of Convict’s Office, Sydney, August 24, 1826.

THE undermentioned Prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all Constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody:

1.  Wood, Henry, Shipley (4), shoemaker, 23 Gloucestershire, 5 feet one inch, hazel eyes, brown hair, fair comp.  10 Mile Station Road Party, Parramatta Road.
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Possibly as a result of his two attempts at absconding from the clearing parties, Henry was again placed at the Public Works, in 1826.  No further information regarding Henry during late 1826 to mid 1828 has been forthcoming, except that he was placed at the Public Works, again, in 1828.  On 10 July 1828, Henry was granted his Certificate of Freedom (CF#28/0650) (which he tore up and returned to the authorities at the time he left for WA), and on 19 December 1829 he was given permission to leave NSW aboard the “Leda” for the Swan River Colony, Western Australia (WA).  The passenger list of the “Leda” does not list Henry, so it is most likely that he worked his passage to WA as a member of the crew.  The passenger list, does however, include Elizabeth Robinson, so it is obvious that they had come to know each other during his time in NSW.  Henry (and Elizabeth) arrived at Fremantle, WA on 15 January 1830, and on 28 January 1830 he became an indentured servant to James Henty. 

Apart from a few mentions of Henry’s various occupations, such as shoemaker, fence splitter, kangaroo shooter, fisherman, no other information regarding Henry and Elizabeth Wood has been found, until Henry is arrested for stealing in 1845.  The newspaper item is rather long, and has been transcribed in its entirety, as one incident leads to another.

The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal (WA: 1833-1847), Sat 22 March 1845,  page 2

John Nixon, one of the lads from the Parkhurst Establishment, who absconded from his employer at Fremantle some time back, and was suspected of having committed several depredations at Perth, was apprehended a second time, having on the first occasion made his escape from the Constable, and brought into Fremantle and placed in confinement in the jail.

We believe he has confessed that he committed the robberies with which he was charged, and gave information of two others, that of the Government Bonded Warehouse, and at Mr. Wickstead’s, Fremantle, in which he was implicated at the instigation of a man named Harry Woods, a kangaroo hunter and wild duck provider for the Fremantle market.  A warrant was immediately issued for the apprehension of this man, and by a little stratagem he was taken without effecting his expressed determination to take the lives of those who would dare to seize his person.  He had a double-barrelled gun on his shoulder at the time he was taken, and thee were three muskets loaded found in his house.  He will be tried at the next ensuing Quarter Sessions.
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The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal (WA: 1833-1847), Saturday 5 April 1845, page 3.

QUARTER SESSIONS
Perth, April 2, 1845
Before W.H. Mackie, Esq, Chairman, a full bench of Magistrates, and a grand and petit jury.
               
Henry Woods, charged with burglary and stealing a silver thimble. 

The Advocate-General, G.F. Moore, Esq, in opening the case to the jury, observed that the charge was apparently trifling, a link of evidence which would be adduced before them, would tend to show that the prisoner was engaged in a most daring act of burglary.  This little thimble had led to the disclosure of the whole facts.  An approver of Queen’s evidence would be brought before them, and such testimony, he admitted, must be received with great caution, but he was of opinion it would be so fully corroborated by other witnesses, that any doubt of the boy’s veracity, if such doubt existed, would be removed.  The boy had been guilty of delinquencies, but in order to convict the older offender it was found necessary to resort to his evidence.

The Advocate-General proceeded to call John Wickstead:  I recollect my house at Fremantle being broken open and robbed on Friday night or Saturday morning in November last.  Mrs. Wickstead, getting up first, discovered that the house had been broken open.  On being informed of it, I examined the premises, and found a pane broken in a back window, and the back door open.  It had been opened from the inside.  I am sure the door was fastened the previous night; I saw it fastened myself.  I missed a writing desk containing money, papers etc., and a packet of goldbeater’s skin.  I also found a workbox lying on the sand with the contents consisting of a thread and tape, and such like articles.  I also missed a Johnson’s Dictionary, which I had left in the desk.  I afterwards heard that a packed of goldbeater’s skin and other articles had been found in a cupboard in the house of Wm. Pearce.  I went to Pearce’s and examined the articles, and immediately identified a Johnson’s Dictionary as the one I missed, and a packet of goldbeater’s skin, and two ink bottles, and some memorandum books, all which I identified as my property, and as having been in my writing desk at the time of the burglary.  Pearce said he believed those articles to have been brought to his house by John Naughton, then in his employ.  I believe the thimble now produced to be my property.  It was given several years ago to my daughter, and when she left the Colony she gave it to my son David, who used it as a plaything.  It was kept in various places, and I have seen it placed in the workbox, which I found after the morning of the robbery, thrown upon the sand. 

Before I went to live in the house, the prisoner lived in it, and must, I presume, have been well acquainted with the premises.  When I first saw the thimble in the possession of the constable, I at once said that I believed it to be my son’s thimble.  I have no doubt whatever in my mind that the thimble is my son’s.  My son’s thimble has never been seen in my house since the burglary.  It is an old-fashioned thimble and of very small size, and was given to my daughter when she was a girl of five or six years old.

Cross-examined by prisoner:  I recollect that a few weeks before the burglary, I met prisoner in Fremantle, and asked him for payment of a small bill.  He answered me with a volley of abuse.  I may have said, but I do not recollect that I did (in answer to his abuse), that if he did not take care, I would send him back where he came from.  I do not recollect seeing the prisoner in Fremantle on the night of the burglary, or the day before.  To the best of my recollection, I saw the thimble within a fortnight or three weeks before the burglary.  I did not miss the thimble until I was informed that Constable Smith had in his possession some articles found in prisoner’s house.  I then went and saw the thimble along with Mrs. Wickstead and we both immediately recognised it.

Thomas Harwood: I executed a search warrant in the house of the prisoner in company with Nicholas Smith.  It was dark when we made the search.  I got hold of a little housewife*, (* a term first used in the 18th century to refer to a sewing or mending kit where people usually kept toiletries) which prisoner’s wife was very anxious to get back from me, but I refused to give it to her.  I handed the housewife over to Nicholas Smith without looking at the contents, it being too dark.  The housewife was in a small bag, in a till* (*interior compartment) of a chest.  Mrs. Woods told me that the bag had nothing of any consequence in it.  I did not receive the housewife from the hands of Mrs. Woods.  Prisoner was in the house and had been arrested by Smith before I took the bag and housewife.

Nicholas Smith: I went with Harwood to arrest prisoner and to execute a search warrant.  After I had arrested and secured the prisoner, Harwood gave me a small bag, which, together with other articles found there, I carried to Fremantle, without examining them at prisoner’s house.  On the following morning I examined the contents of the bag, and found a housewife in it, and in that housewife, the thimble now produced.  I was present when the thimble was shown to Mr. and Mrs. Wickstead, and both of them immediately recognised it.  I remember that when Harwood got hold of the bag in prisoner’s house, the prisoner’s wife asked him to give her back the bag, because they contained her marriage lines.  When I examined the contents of the bag next morning at Fremantle, I did not see any marriage lines in it.  There were papers in the bag, but I did not examine them.

John Wickstead: I examined the papers found in the bag when shown to me.  I did not notice any lines.

John Naughton: In November last I was apprentice to Wm. Pearce.  The latter end of that month I met a person who was then living with prisoner, whom I knew only by the name of Tom, an American, but whose name I have since heard is Wm. Henry Clark.  He told me,’ we want to see you this evening’.  I understood him to mean himself and prisoner by “we”.  I went to Clark in the evening and found him outside Curtis’s in company of the prisoner.  That was about nine o’clock.  It was moonlight.  They asked me to help them to go into Thomas’ store and get some flour and sugar.  I understood them to mean, “break into” Thomas’ store.  We all three went to that store, and seeing a light there, we gave the job up and went and lay down near the chapel.  Prisoner then proposed breaking into Mr. Wickstead’s store.  We went to that store and tried the windows but found them too well secured.  We then went round to a small window of a back parlour leading to the bar, but could not open it.  I threw a stone and broke a pane of glass in it.  We went and laid down in the next grant to see if the stone had made any alarm.  We lay there about half an hour.  We returned to the window, and I put my hand in through the broken pane and turned an iron button or handle, and opened up the window, through which Clark helped me to get in.  I opened the door of the parlour and prisoner and Clark came in.  We had to open another door before we could get into the bar.  There was a workbox on the table in the parlour.  Either prisoner or Clark upset the box and some buttons and lace, and such things fell out.  I am not sure whether the box was taken out of the house or left in it.  We went into the bar, Clark opening the door.  Prisoner tried the door leading out of the bar, and the sliding shutters over the bar, but could not open either.  Prisoner and Clark helped themselves to some grog out of a keg on a shelf.  We had no light.  Prisoner and Clark got intoxicated, and stumbled over the chairs, and prisoner threw down a spoon.  Prisoner said it was no good going away without anything.  He then took up a writing desk, and we all went out of the house into the garden, and over the garden wall to the front of the house.  Prisoner was carrying the desk.  He stumbled and fell, and the desk struck against the corner of the wall.  The desk flew open and several papers and other articles fell out.  I took a 5s. piece out of the top of the desk, and the several articles now produced from a drawer in the desk.  I first asked the prisoner what I was to have for my share.  Prisoner said he did not care, for the things were of no use.  Prisoner carried away the desk, and he and Clark went away in the direction of the Murray Road.  I went over the water to Pearce’s with the articles, and tied them up in the handkerchief in which they now are, and put them in a cupboard in Pearce’s house.  I have never had any conversation with the prisoner since the robbery at Mr Wickstead’s about the property we then took.  Clark has left the Colony.  It was a couple of hours before daybreak when I crossed the water to go back to Pearce’s.  Prisoner proposed the way of getting into Mr. Wickstead’s house.  He told us that he had lived in it before.  I did not drink anything while I was in the bar.

John A. Sullivan: I was a store and barkeeper to Mr. Curtis, at Fremantle, in the month of November last.  I recollect the night on which Mr. Wickstead’s house was broken open.  On the evening immediately preceding the night of the robbery, I served the prisoner with bread and butter, and beer.  He then went into the taproom.  Shortly after I saw Clark, an American, who has since left the colony, enter the tap and look around as if he was searching for some one, and he then departed by the back door.  That was some time after four o’clock.  Prisoner had been splitting shingles for Mr. Curtis.

Nicholas Smith, re-examined: I was present at the examination before the committing Magistrates.  Woods said that the thimble was got at the time his child was living at Mrs. Bilbra’s.  On taking prisoner back to the jail, his wife was at the door.  Prisoner said to her “you recollect where the thimble was got?”  She says “what thimble?”  He answered “why, the silver thimble”.  I did not allow any more conversation then.  His wife made no reply.  After I had locked up the prisoner his wife was still in the passage of the jail and she asked me what thimble it was that Harry spoke about to her.  I said, a brass thimble.  She answered, “yes there was a little silver thimble.  I got that from Mr. King’s servant girl.  She gave it to my daughter before we went to live at the Salt Water Lakes”

When examined before the committing Magistrates, Wood said he was out in the bush splitting shingles, five miles beyond the Salt Water Lakes, which are seven miles beyond Fremantle.

Defence:  a general assertion of innocence.

Verdict:  guilty – sentence, seven years transportation.

The Advocate-General observed that now the verdict had been returned, he would take the opportunity of stating that the eye of justice was fixed upon nine individuals, who were spoken of by Mr. Wade as he was termed.  These, he expected, would follow him as convicted felons.  If any one or more of this number were present, he hoped that what he stated would prove a warning to them, and induce them to pursue a course of rectitude which would redeem past offences, and be beneficial to themselves.
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Henry was sentenced to 10 years transportation to Tasmania in 1845, and he arrived in Tasmania on board the “CHAMPION” on 22 August 1845; his wife and two youngest children, Mary and Jane had been allowed to follow Henry to his place of incarceration.  Their two eldest children remained in WA; unfortunately it is unknown who cared for them at this time.  Their daughter Sarah Emma Watkins Wood married Thomas Henry Strang Poland on 21 May 1846, the day after her 15th birthday.  There is no further information on Henry jnr until he married Eliza Hines in 1865 (reg #2309) and went to live in Tasmania.

According to the convict transportation register, this is the given description of Henry Wood (snr) on his arrival in Tasmania.

Transported to NSW per SHIPLEY 1819 for shoplifting, tried at Gloucester.
Married:  wife & 2 children* (*here, they have not included Sarah and Henry jnr who remained in WA.)               
Tried:  Supreme Court Western Australia, 1 January 1845. 7 years.
Arrived:  22nd August 1845
Protestant, married 4 children
Trade:  splitter and fencer
Height:  5 ft 5-1/2 inches
Age:  36
Complexion:  fair
Head:  oval
Whiskers:  black
Visage:  oval
Forehead:  low
Eyebrows:  black & shaggy
Eyes:  grey
Nose:  medium
Mouth:  medium
Chin:  medium
Native place:  Cheltenham, England
Marks:  EW, HW, RW, Sarah Woods (middle of right arm).  These
marks are most likely tattoos.
Period of labour:  30 months prob. Public Works
Station of gang:  no entry
Class:  no entry
Offences and sentences:  removed from Port Arthur as a 3rd class pass holder
10 November 47 (illegible)
    28 February 49 – turbulently resisting his master’s authority – 6 months     hard labour – 
        recommended to be removed to the other side of the island.
Applied to be sent to Hobart Town on expiration of servitude and not allowed to enter at the other side.  July 23/49 Crown. Resisting a constable in the execution of his duty.  Existing sentence of hard labour extended 3 months.

G.S.D. Applied (date unknown) Ticket of Leave.  Refused – to apply in 4 months, 5/6/50
Ticket of leave – 12/11/50
Recommended general pardon – 25/5/52
Certificate of freedom* - ?? May 1855 – himself
(*a document stating that a convict’s sentence had been served and was usually given to convicts with a 7, 10 or 14 year sentence.)
Remarks:  Petition for indulgence* refused 18/5/47, record no. CON 39/2 (* Indulgences, or privileges, sought by convicts, eg to sleep out of barracks, to have wife assigned to him, to marry, to be released from irons, to have sentences remitted, ticket-of leave or conditional pardon)

From records and information available, it appears that Henry and Elizabeth* (or Jane^) moved to The Springs, Mt Wellington, Tasmania about 1850, because later newspaper reports at the time of Henry’s death, stated he had lived at The Springs for over 30 years.  Below are newspaper items of various topics regarding Henry and Jane Woods.

(*On one of the Passenger Lists for those leaving Tasmania for the mainland, these is a record for an Elizabeth Wood, departing from Launceston on 17 Dec 1848 on board the “SWAN”, and arriving at Port Philip.  Her status is described as ‘free’ indicating that she was not an ex convict.  There is no confirmation of when, where or why Elizabeth left Henry and returned to the mainland, taking Jane and Mary with her - ajb).

(^It is most likely Jane who moved to the Springs Henry, as by 1853 they were married -  ajb). 

NEWSPAPER ITEMS FROM NATIONAL LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA WEBSITE (accessed and transcribed by Annette Bergeron)

The Mercury, (Hobart, Tas: 1860-1954), 25 January 1865

Fall from horse – About noon yesterday, Woods, the well-known keepe

Anonymous on 18th September, 2011 wrote:

Several other descendants of Henry Woods and Elizabeth Robinson believe that Elizabeth may have been the daughter of Jane Broughton who arrived on the Hooghley in 1830 with her husband Joseph and 5 children.

“A Colony Detailed- the first census of Western Australia 1832- Ian Berryman gives the following for Joseph and Jane Broughton
Numbers 977-982 on the census.
Joseph Broughton and family: surname given as ‘Boughton’ on the census, but ‘Broughton’ on the passenger list of the Hooley. (arrived 12 Feb. 1830)
MS signature ‘Brotten’ (CSR 29/116). Five children are mentioned on the passenger list but only four on the census.

4 children listed at census in 1832 are Anne 16, William 13, Thomas 9, Mark 7 Two oldest born Staffordshire, 2 younger born Lancaster . Joseph labourer aged 36 born Lancashire, wife Jane aged 38 born Staffordshire.

In the ‘Missing Persons’ section of the book re goes on to say ’ unnamed daughter of Joseph Broughton, who is recorded on the census with his wife and other four children. The passenger list of the Hooley gives Broughton as having two daughters (names not listed) aged 17 and 13, but only the younger daughter is recorded on the census. ‘

There are no Broughton in the deaths list.”

The marriage of Henry Woods and Elizabeth Robinson in 1830 was witnessed by Joseph and ‘James’ [Jane?] Broughton.

Henry woods and Joseph Broughton witnessed the marriage of George Field and Ann Broughton in 1833.

When Henry was transported to Tasmania in 1845, his wife Elizabeth and their two younger daughters followed him. The two elder children, Henry junior and Sarah were left in West Australia with persons unknown, but we believe it may have been Jane Broughton who raised them.
The death certificate of Henry Woods junior from 1908 gives his mother As ‘Elizabeth Broaden’ [Broughton].

The use of the name ‘Jane’ through the subsequent generations of Elizabeth and Henry’s family also leads us to believe that there was a strong connection to Jane Broughton.

Betty Sherry on 24th July, 2013 wrote:

Henry Wood was baptized 17/06/1803 Cheltenham Gloustershire England. Parents John Wood and Mary Wood nee Watkins.
He was transported twice. In 1822, to NSW for 7 years, in Western Australia in 1845 to Port Arthur Tasmania. He died 6 September 1882 Hobart Tasmania. He was known as ‘the Old Man of the Mountain’

Henry was accused of stealing and brought before the Cheltenham Lent Assizes, March 29 1820. He was sentenced to one year in penitentiary and thrice whipped. His behaviour is described as ‘very bad’.
The court records read as follows:
When brought in- 22nd March 1820
No. 170
Name Henry Wood
Age 16
Parish Cheltenham
By whom committed- James Agg Esq., James Clutterbuck Esq., Robert Capper Esq.
Pigots Directory of Gloucestershire 1830 has no record of James Agg although there is a Thomas Agg surgeon and a William John Agg Esq of Hewitts, Jas. Clutterbuck Esq. of 5 Berkeley Place, and Robert Capper Esq. of Marle Hill.
Crime- Charges on the oaths of Wm. Harding & Thos. Barnard with feloniously breakg. & entg. the dwelling house of the sd. Wm. Barnard in the day time no person being therein and stealing thereout 3/6 in copper his property and also with stealing about six pounds of bacon from the shop of Henry Kerridge in Cheltenham and also with stealing from the shop of Charles Hale in Cheltenham two flutes and also with stealing a spade the property of John Baker.
According to Pigot’s Directory of Gloucestershire of 1830 Henry Kerridge was a butcher at Hewlett Street Cheltenham and Charles Hale was a seller of music and instruments at 307 High Street Cheltenham. BAKER John, Coal Merchant & Dealer, Gloucester Gate
Marks Stature Etc. - Brown hair dark eyes fresh complexion broad face short snub nose small mouth a scar on his right shoulder a scar on the back of his right hand a mole on the back of his neck large forehead sevl. moles about his breast. Labourer. not read Heighth 4 10
When tried & verdict of trial- Lent Assizes March 29 1820, One year in penitentiary thrice whipped.
When disshd. [dispatched?] 5th April 1820
How behaved- Very bad

He was again convicted of shoplifting at the Summer Assizes Gloucestershire in 1821. The court records read as follows:
When brought in- May 31 1821
No. - 22
Prisoner’s Name- Henry Wood
Age 17
Parish- Cheltenham
By whom committed- Jas. Clutterbuck Esq., Robert Capper Esq., James Agg Esq.
Crime- Charged on the oath of Richd. [Richard] Elsmore and others with having on the 24th day of May instant feloniously stolen taken and carried away a number? of five? lambs? type? knives and wisps [rasps?] from and out of the shop of the sd. [said] Richd. Elsmore at Cheltenham & also he was charged on the oath of Wm. Rouse & others having on the 21st May inst. feloniously stolen taken & carried away two gold brooches from and out of the shop of the affm. [afforementioned] Rouse at Cheltm. [Cheltenham].
Marks Sture Etc.- See No. 170 Lent Assizes 1820
When tried & verdict of trial- Trinity Sessions, July 10th 1821
Transported 7 years
When desschd.[ despatched?]- Removed 11th July 1821
How behavd.[behaved]- Very Bad
See penitentiary register

Henry is listed as a convict absconder in 1824 & 1826 in the colony of NSW (Jenny Fawcett, Genseek Genealogy)

The Biographical Dictionary (Western Australia) lists Henry Wood with the following information:
WOOD, Henry, b. 1807, arrived from NSW 1829/30, married 9/10/1830 Elizabeth ROBINSON. Children Susan Emma b. 1832, Jane b. July 1837, Mary b.1841. Indentured to James Henty 29/1/1830. Listed in 1832 Census as a baker. Employed as labourer by Wittenoom 25/8/1841 lot 346 at Fremantle. Reverted to the Crown. Sought permission for himself and wife to leave (the colony) 26/12/1832 but remained and was listed in 1837 Census. Was a shingle splitter at Fremantle. In 1845 when he was sentenced to 10 years transportation for stealing two silver spoons. His wife and 2 children departed 7/1845 per ‘Champion’ for Tasmania. Illit.
Another edition says he stole a silver thimble from Wickstead.?

Archives Office of Tasmania give the following information for Henry Woods. Arrived 22 August 1845 on the Champion after being tried in Western Australia January 1845 .

NSW State Records, Colonial Secretary- 1822, April 24, Henry Woods (per Shipley [4]) on list of prisoners assigned He was assigned to Richard Westcott on 6/4/1822, residence York Street Sydney. Assigned to Darcy Wentworth on 24/4/1822, residence Sydney- remarks- to R Westcott [ to Wentworth, not being a mechanic]?
## 1822 Census of NSW, Henry Wood, convict, ‘Shipley’, 7 years, town gang Liverpool.
## 1823,1824,1825 General Census of NSW- Henry Wood, convict, ‘Shipley’ 1822, 7 yrs, clearing party Mr George Cox at Bringelly.
## The Convicts to Port Jackson CD- Henry Wood arrived ‘Shipley’ 1822. Tried Gloucester 1821, 7 yrs, age 18
viii) 1824, May 31, Henry Wood (per Shipley 1822) of George Cox’s clearing party. On return of fines and punishments inflicted by the Bench of Evan. Henry was charged with mutiny and sentenced to 75 lashes?
ix) Certificate of Freedom
Henry Wood, Cert. Freedom No. 28/0650, Item 4/4294, Reel 983, Date of certificate 10 July 1828, Vessel ‘Shipley’. Year 1822?
The certificate of Freedom gives the following information:
No. 28/650
Date, 10 July 1828
Prisoner’s No.-no entry
Name, Henry Wood
Ship, Shipley 4
Master, Moncrief
Year, 1822
Native Place, Gloucester
Trade or calling- Shoemaker
Offence, No entry
Place of Trial, Gloucester Q?
Date of trial. 10 July 1821
Sentence, Seven Years
Year of birth, 1801
Height, five feet 5 inches
Complexion, fair
Hair, brown
Eyes, hazel
General remarks, No entry

Written across the certificate is the following- Torn up 19 Dec 1829 it having been returned mutilated & the holder permitted to clear out in the Barque Leda_

(The WA Genealogical Society shipping records give the following information about the ‘Leda’ From the “Western Australian Chronicle and Perth Gazette” No.8, April 9th 1831- Arrived Jan 15th , Leda 188 tons from Sydney , departed Feb 1st

The Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser (NSW 1803-1842)

Dated Thursday 25 November 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, NOVEMBER 23, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party.
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)- did they escape/travel together?

Dated Thursday 2 December 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, NOVEMBER 30, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party.
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)- did they escape/travel together?

Thursday 9 December 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, DECEMBER 7, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party.
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)

Thursday 16 December 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, DECEMBER 14, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party,
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)

Thursday 23 December 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, DECEMBER 21, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party,
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)

Thursday 30 December 1824
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, DECEMBER 28, 1824
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party,
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)

Thursday 6 January 1825
PRINCIPAL SUPERINTENDENT’S OFFICE- SYDNEY, JANUARY 4, 1825
The undermentioned prisoners having absented themselves from their respective employments, and some of them at large with false certificates, all constables and others are hereby required to use their utmost exertions in lodging them in safe custody…
Henry Wood, Shipley 4, 21, Gloucestershire.. 5 feet l
and a half inches, hazle eyes, brown hair, fair complexion,
George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party,
(also James Hudson, Dick, 17 Reading, 5 feet and half an inch, hazle eyes, brown hair, florid complexion, George Cox, Esq. Clearing Party)

Name:
Henry Wood
Age:
17
Estimated Birth Year:
abt 1804
Date Received:
28 Aug 1821
Ship:
Justitia
Place Moored:
Woolwich
Date Convicted:
1 Jul 1821
Place Convicted:
Gloucester
PRISON HULK REGISTERS

The Mercury, Hobart, Friday 25 July 1879, page 2
The “Old Man of the Mountain.”-Amongst
the business brought before the Executive Committee
of the Benevolent Society, at its weekly meeting
yesterday, was a letter from the Colonial Secretary,
recommending the bearer, Henry Woods, who lives
at the Springs, Mount Wellington, to the con-
sideration of the committee. Woods, it appears, has
presented a petition to the Government praying for
relief, as he is past work and unable to support
himself. The application is being enquired into by
the administrator of charitable grants. Woods
appears to be in a pitiable state, as he stated to
Mr. Reibey that he had walked into town, the
well-known white horse being dead, on the morning
of the interview ; and the old man had left no food
in the house for himself and wife. Dr. Hall expressed
his surprise at receiving the application, as he had
understood for years that Woods was earning a very
handsome living, and was in no likelihood of being
in a state of destitution. Woods had one son living
with him, 40 years of age, and also engaged as a
mountain guide. Dr. Hall had been informed,
however, that it was not so much Woods’ intention
to apply for food at the Benevolent Society as to
get a pension from the Government. The Registrar
(Mr. Witt) said that Woods had seemed very glad
to take the three loaves and a little tea and sugar
with which he was supplied. As the Government
decision might not be given for a few days, it was
decided by the committee to continue the relief.
Mr. Mather remarked that in the summer time the
trade might be all right again, and asked the
Registrar on what grounds Woods based his request
for a pension. Mr. Witt replied, amidst some
laughter, that he did not know.’

Betty Sherry on 24th July, 2013 wrote:

Historical Notes of Wellington Park include the following- ‘1870s - Henry Woods ‘the old man of the Mountain’ and his family live in a hut at the Springs and provides refreshments to visitors and sells ice from the ice houses.‘

Photographs of Henry Wood held at State Library Tasmania
1. Title: Mr. & Mrs. Woods of The Springs, Mt. Wellington
Creator(s): Alfred Winter ca. 1837-1911
Date: 18—Description: 1 photograph : sepia toning ; 10 x 6 cm.
Notes: Exact measurements 92 x 60 mm, Title inscribed in pencil on verso in unknown hand., Mr Woods seated with Mrs. Woods standing at his side.      State Library Tasmania

2. Title: Old Wood’s son who used to live at Springs in old days

Creator(s): Alfred Winter ca. 1837-1911
Date: 18— Description: 1 photograph : sepia toning ; 10 x 6 cm.
Notes: Exact measurements 92 x 60 mm, Title inscribed in pencil on verso in unknown hand., Old Mr. Woods seated with his son standing beside him.        State Library Tasmania

3. Title: One of old Wood’s sons and daughter

Creator(s): Alfred Winter ca. 1837-1911
Date: 18—Description: 1 photograph : sepia toning ; 10 x 6 cm.
Notes: Exact measurements 92 x 60 mm, Title inscribed in pencil on verso in unknown hand.
State Library Tasmania

Convict Changes History

Betty Sherry on 24th July, 2013 made the following changes:

source, date of birth 1803, date of death 6th September, 1882, gender, occupation, crime

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au