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Sarah Cramsie

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Sarah Cramsie
Aliases: Cramsil, Cramsig
Gender: f

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1797
Occupation: Country servant
Date of Death: -
Age: -

Life Span

Life span

Female median life span was 59 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to 7 years

Crime: Street robbery
Convicted at: Antrim Court (Ireland)
Sentence term: 7 years
Ship: Brothers
Departure date: 3rd October, 1826
Arrival date: 4th February, 1827
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 157 other convicts

References

Primary source: 1. NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842, Bound Indentures 1827 2. http://findingaids.nationalarchives.ie/ 3. Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser, Sat 1 Aug 1829, p1 4. NSW Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 1828-1830, 1838-1839, (Reel 3035) NSW Certificates of Freedom, 1810-1814, 1827-1867 5. (NRS 12210), Butts of Certificates of Freedom 1832, May
Source description:

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Community Contributions

Dianne Jones on 12th June, 2020 wrote:

CRIME: Convicted 17 March 1825 at Antrim; widow with two children; 28 years old; native place Belfast. She had no former convictions.

DESCRIPTION: 5’5”, fair complexion, light brown hair, brown eyes, raised mole on left side of upper lip (see NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842, Bound Indentures 1827).

1826, January: CRAMSIE, Sarah – Imprisonment place: Cork Penitentiary; Document date: 00/01/1826; Document ref 1: PPC 3038; Comment 1: List of convicts, male and female, in the Penitentiary House, Cork, remaining after… departure of the “[Lady] Rowena” [on 26 January] (see http://findingaids.nationalarchives.ie/).

Dianne Jones on 12th June, 2020 wrote:

1826, 3 October: “Brothers 2” sailed from Cork, with 161 female prisoners, all from Ireland. Four families of convicts already in the colony came as free passengers. Three women died during the voyage of 122 days.

Ninety five of the prisoners were “single women, all of child bearing age although only nine were recorded as having children. Many of the women [including Sarah Cramsie] had left children behind in Ireland.” (see https://www.jenwilletts.com/convict_ship_brothers_1827.htm). The Brothers also carried ten tons of copper coins for use in the colony (The Australian, 3 Feb 1827, p3).

1827, 4 February: The Brothers arrived at Port Jackson. “Government notice. Colonial Secretary’s Office, Feb. 2, 1827. Notice is hereby given that families who are in want of Female Servants, may be supplied from the prisoners arrived in the ship Brothers, from Cork; provided they apply, according to the established form, to the Principal Superintendent of convicts, before Thursday next, the 8th instant. Printed forms for this purpose may be obtained, by applying at this Office; or, at the Office of the Superintendent of convicts. By Command of his Excellency the Governor, ALEX. McLEAY.” (The Australian, 3 Feb 1827, p2)

The Monitor reported the arrival of The Brothers, as follows: “A CORRESPONDENT says:— : ‘THE ‘Green Isle of Erin’ lent her aid towards strengthening the social compact nature has formed between man and his fair coadjutor, by the transmission per ‘The Brothers’ of one hundred and sixty vestal sisters — her children, to the favoured land of young Australia. On Monday, fate willed that they should tread our Southern soil; and H. M. Dock Yard was to be the first scene in their new life. Some seventy-three or so were selected as a domiciliary augmentation to the establishment de cousinieres, et filles de chambre of Sydney, and its vicinity; and the residue were wafted to the sylvan scenes of Parramatta, some to rusticate in the dairy, and some to be inaugurated in the mysteries of the Temple of Vesta – al anglais, the Factory. ‘Beauty needs not the foreign aid of ornament. But is, when unadorned, adorned the most.’— so says the poet. Now whether the subjects of these remarks were beautiful, and needed not ornament, be it for other historians to describe;—certain it is, they were ‘unadorned by art.’ They seemed neither to have been bred in cities, nor trained in the service of the great. The most homely breeding was depicted in their countenances, and a recent acquaintance with the ‘Bog of Allan’ might be easily deduced from their appearance as a fact. A matron there was in whose physiognomy a geographer might have traced the ‘old head of Kinsale’, in another the ‘Red Sea’, while a third bore an analogy to ‘The Blue Mountains’. Of ages, we believe, there were from sixteen to sixty—there were dimples and wrinkles; the light fairy tread and the half smiles of anticipation, and lowering brows, indicating retrospection—there were auburn ringlets floating wild as mountain breezes, beside the silvered locks of age; there was, in fact, a good sample of all the contrarieties and variations which the wild mountains and villages of ancient Erin produce.” (The Monitor, 17 Feb 1827, p2)

Dianne Jones on 12th June, 2020 wrote:

1827: Sarah CRAMSIL was assigned privately to William Browne Esq., Abbotsbury (see NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842, Bound Indentures 1827). Not known if she became a “fille de chambre” or “rusticate[d] in a dairy”…

William Browne of Abbotsbury, known as “Merchant Browne”, was one of the first settlers to claim land at Wollongong. In 1815, “he drove his stock to and stationed them on the banks of the lllawarra Lake (the native name of which is ‘Yalla’)” (see J.F.R. Browne, 1975, “A History of William ‘Merchant’ Browne of Abbotsbury and Appin 1762-1833”).

Browne also had a house at Macquarie Place in Sydney. In March 1822, Governor Thomas Brisbane appointed him a Justice of the Colony along with seven other men – Rev Samuel Marsden, John Palmer, Esq, George Thomas Palmer, Esq, John Blaxland, Esq, Alexander Berry, Esq, Edward Wollstonecraft, Esq, and John McHenry, Esq.

1829, 5 August: Sarah Cramsie, per Brothers 2, Ticket of Leave, for the District of Liverpool (see Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser, Sat 1 Aug 1829, p1).

1830, 16 January: Ticket of Leave altered for the District of Illawarra (see NSW Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869, Ticket of leave butts (NRS 12202) Ticket of leave butts, May 1829-Dec 1829).

1830, March: James Greylish, 43, bachelor, and Sarah Cramsie, 31, widow, apply for publication of banns at St Luke’s, Liverpool. Both are deemed to be of good character (see NSW Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 1828-1830, 1838-1839, (Reel 3035)).

1830, 14 April: James Greglish, 43, per Dorothy, life, and Sarah Cramsie, 31, per Brothers 2, 7 years, are granted permission to marry. Both have a Ticket of Leave (see NSW Registers of Convicts’ Applications to Marry, 1826-1851). [Note: Her age in 1830 is not consistent with CoF details.]

1832, 10 May: Sarah Cramsie, per Brothers 2, Certificate of Freedom (see Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser, 17 May 1832, p1). By this time her description has changed to a dark, ruddy complexion, brown hair and hazel eyes (see NSW Certificates of Freedom, 1810-1814, 1827-1867
(NRS 12210), Butts of Certificates of Freedom 1832, May).

Convict Changes History

Dianne Jones on 12th June, 2020 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: 7 years, voyage, source: 1. NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842, Bound Indentures 1827 2. http://findingaids.nationalarchives.ie/ (prev. ), firstname: Sarah, surname: Cramsie, alias1: Cramsil, alias2: Cramsig, alias3: , alias4: , date of bi

Dianne Jones on 12th June, 2020 made the following changes:

source: 1. NSW Convict Indents, 1788-1842, Bound Indentures 1827 2. http://findingaids.nationalarchives.ie/ 3. Sydney Gazette and NSW Advertiser, Sat 1 Aug 1829, p1 4. NSW Convict Applications for the Publication of Banns, 1828-1830, 1838-1839, (Reel 3035

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