Hi Guest!
Contribute to this record

Michael Mcnally

** community contributed record **

Name, Aliases & Gender

Name: Michael Mcnally
Aliases: Mcenally
Gender: m

Birth, Occupation & Death

Date of Birth: 1786
Occupation: Labourer
Date of Death: 1827
Age: 41 years

Life Span

Life span

Male median life span was 53 years*

* Median life span based on contributions

Conviction & Transportation

Sentence Severity

Sentence Severity

Sentenced to Life

Crime: Robbery
Convicted at: Ireland, Antrim
Sentence term: Life
Ship: Chapman
Departure date: 25th March, 1817
Arrival date: 26th July, 1817
Place of arrival New South Wales
Passenger manifest Travelled with 86 other convicts

References

Primary source: New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869 New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1817 Chapman https://refashioningrenaissance.eu/the-theft-in-the-bleachfield/ https://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/kinggeorge/t/003ktop00000052u046k0000.html
Source description:

Did you find the person you were looking for?

If Michael Mcnally was the person you were looking for, you may be able to discover more about them by looking at our resources page.

If you have more hunting to do, try a new search or browse the convict records.

Know more about Michael Mcnally?

Contribute to this record

Community Contributions

Penny-Lyn Beale on 19th September, 2020 wrote:

1822 - 2 Jan. Gaol: Sydney. Record Type: Entrance Book
Prisoner. Received from Liverpool. assaulting their Govenor
—————————————————-
1823 - 27 Jun. On list of prisoners assigned. Comments:Per “Chapman”, 1817. Page: 83
Assigned to Waterloo Company. Sydney
——————————————————
1826 - 2 Feb. New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869
No; 27/2163
Year of birth; 1786
Native Place; Co Derry
Calling; Labourer
Offence; No details
Date of Trial: Co Antrim. Autumn 1816
Sentence; Life
Height; 5 ft. 5 1/2
Complexion; Ruddy
Hair Light Brown
Eyes; Blue
District; Airds

Penny-Lyn Beale on 19th September, 2020 wrote:

Sydney, Australia, Anglican Parish Registers, 1814-2011
Liverpool St Luke. 

Name; Michael McNally
Abode; Liverpool
When Buried; 1827,  April 20th
Age;  35  
Ships Name; Chapman
Quality or Profession; Assigned to Mr Mannix
By whom the Ceremony was preformed; A Roman Catholic

Dianne Jones on 16th January, 2021 wrote:

CRIME: Michael McNally/McEnally was tried in County Antrim in Summer of 1816. His sentence of death was received for a “Bleach Green robbery” (see New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1817 Chapman). The sentence was commuted to transportation for life.

Dianne Jones on 16th January, 2021 wrote:

Another convict on the Chapman, Patrick McKenna, had also received a similar sentence at County Antrim for robbing a bleach green. It’s not clear if the two were co-accused or merely appeared at the same session of the court.

The severity of their sentences may be better understood after considering the manufacturing process for linen and the fibre’s value – with items ranging from sheets to towels and clothing constituting an important part of household and personal textiles. In Denmark in the 17th century, for example, textiles were “desirable items to steal, as they could be transported easily and resold or pawned, and acted as a kind of currency”, according to Larsen (2019) at https://refashioningrenaissance.eu/the-theft-in-the-bleachfield/.
 
An illustration in the British Library by Hinks from 1783 called “The Perspective View of a Bleach Green taken in the County of Downe” shows rows of linen spread out after wet bleaching. The Library says a linen bleaching green or bleachfield “consisted of a central house for bleaching and finishing the material, with lands extending up to 25 or 30 acres on which to spread the linen. The linen was bleached with an alkaline solution and then rinsed and spread on grass - a bleach green. The linen was rinsed a number of times and so many of these greens were situated next to rivers where a good supply of water could be accessed.” (https://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/kinggeorge/t/003ktop00000052u046k0000.html)

Another description of the process (see Ireland and Peg’s Cottage posts on Facebook) notes that until the end of the 18th century bleaching in Ireland was restricted to between March and October because the process needed “reliable and inexhaustible supplies of water… The linen had to be boiled and rinsed up to a dozen times before being laid out on the bleaching greens to be whitened by the sun and the rain.  It was watered regularly, a process known as ‘wet bleaching’, and everyone had their own secret recipe for aiding the bleaching process, usually incorporating sour milk, urine and manure.”

Dianne Jones on 16th January, 2021 wrote:

PRISON: Michael McNally was transferred from County Antrim to Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin, on December 27, 1816. He became prisoner number 3062. He departed Kilmainham on January 18, 1817, to be “sent aboard the convict ship” (see Ireland, Prison Registers, 1790-1924; Dublin, Kilmainham 1815-1910).

Convict Changes History

Penny-Lyn Beale on 19th September, 2020 made the following changes:

convicted at, term: 99 years, voyage, source: New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869 (prev. ), firstname: Michael, surname: Mcnally, alias1: , alias2: , alias3: , alias4: , date of birth: 1786, date of death: 0000, gender: m, occupation,

Penny-Lyn Beale on 19th September, 2020 made the following changes:

date of death: 1827 (prev. 0000)

Dianne Jones on 16th January, 2021 made the following changes:

source: New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869 New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1817 Chapman (prev. New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869), alias1: Mcenally, crime

Dianne Jones on 16th January, 2021 made the following changes:

source: New South Wales, Australia, Tickets of Leave, 1810-1869 New South Wales, Australia Convict Ship Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1790-1849; 1817 Chapman https://refashioningrenaissance.eu/the-theft-in-the-bleachfield/ https://www.bl.uk/onlinega

This record was discovered and printed on ConvictRecords.com.au